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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/25/2020 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    We have lived here at the lodge for 16 years now, my how time flies. We love the birds and critters and I always have at least 1/2 dozen bird feeders up at all times. I have some with song bird seed mix that I make myself, some with Niger seed and some with suet in the Winter. One of Becky's bigger seller here are Squirrel Buster bird feeders, as she sells dozens of them a year as they are totally squirrel proof and people just love watching the birds, and the antics of the squirrels as they cannot get a seed out of the feeders and just get so frustrated. We have had a total plethora of birds this year. We have been reading about the number of decreasing song birds this year, but our feeders have been full of most of the usual culprits and then lots of strange visitors, including the Robins of a few days ago. Today we were treated with Pileated Woodpeckers at our feeders for the first time EVER. They are very elusive and extremely sensitive to movement. We have heard them and seen them on the trees in small numbers for years, but have never had one approach the deck or the feeders. This morning there were dozens of them here, chasing and chirping, and we had them on not only the suet feeders but the seed feeders as well. It was a wonderful site and we felt truly blessed to have them visit in such huge numbers.
  2. 5 points
    liphunter

    Just cannot get that mad at em

    I know what you mean. Every bass or walleye that I have hooked in the 10 pound range has been like that...
  3. 4 points
    rps

    What's Cooking?

    Pleasant weather in Tulsa today so I started a new project -> seasoning my Christmas present. I finished burning off three thin oil coatings today and will do a couple more the next good weather day. The pictures are during the first coating.
  4. 3 points
    Dock-in-it

    Kim City - Jan 23 - Deep bite

    Fished this morning from 7:30 to 9:30. Was fortunate to catch some quality fish along with several other keepers. From 7:30 to 8:30 the bite was steady. The bite started to slow down at 8:30 and at 9:00 it was done. The technique that worked best was dropping an ice jig to the bottom around visible fish then slow crank thru them. The graph pics show fish above and below my bait and they would approach the ice jig from the top and bottom. And the bottom guys would be your best bet.
  5. 3 points
    jdmidwest

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    Might be slick on the rocks, especially if cfs is high.....
  6. 3 points
    Thursday was the warmest day I've had on the water in 2020. I'm a few hours north, but they were biting good for me. Got to go when I can!
  7. 3 points
    rps

    What's Cooking?

    Finished product for dinner.
  8. 2 points
    ness

    Just funny stuff

  9. 2 points
    In 1919, Norman Rockwell painted two covers for successive issues of a magazine called The Country Gentleman. The images are now in the public domain. The Fishing Trip The Catch Even Norman Rockwell knew worms catch the fish. Why many people avoid using worms and insist on artificial baits would make an excellent topic for a psycho-social doctoral thesis. I won’t be writing that. Instead, this article is intended as a primer for fishing worm harnesses in Tablerock and the other White River impoundments. What I will share comes from fellow walleye fishermen who have showed me a number of tricks. In particular, I want to thank Chuck Etheredge of Holiday Island, Arkansas. Chuck holds the Holiday Island Marina walleye record at 14.5 pounds, and he is the one who taught me about his harnesses for brush fishing crawlers. The Bait Nightcrawlers are one of nature’s perfect animals. They aerate the soil, they help break down leaves and other dead matter to soil, and they are so valuable to growing plants that people buy them to put in their gardens. Brown trout guides below Bull Shoals dam say they use red worms because they are “more natural looking in the water.” The real reason is stocker rainbows that can’t and won’t leave the nightcrawlers alone. In the last several years nightcrawlers have become a major farmed and/or harvested crop. Grocery stores, convenience stores, and even Walmarts sell them. Typically, the containers are Styrofoam or cardboard and are filled with potting soil or mulch. I buy at several locations and find the overall quality quite good. However, I always check the contents before I leave the store. Temperature or stock rotation disasters do happen. Next important tip: As soon as you get home, place the worm boxes in the refrigerator and keep them there until the fishing trip. Crawlers will last several weeks if left alone in the bottom drawer of the refrigerator. If you are not the cook, label the boxes “worms” to avoid screams and other domestic difficulties. On the day I intend to use the crawlers, I pack the boxes in an ice chest with ice. The ice will not freeze them in their containers and will keep them cool and lively. Once I am in the boat and ready to fish, I put some ice and lake water in a flat bottom plastic bowl and add four or five crawlers. The ice water plumps them up and washes the dirt off so your boat floor stays cleaner. In addition, you will be in and out of your cooler less often. When the ice melts, merely add another piece or two. An alternative I recently learned was to bathe a day’s worth of crawlers at once, then place them in the now empty Styrofoam containers with ice. In the event you wish to buy crawlers in bulk, they are available from several mail order sources, including Cabelas. Several chapters of the classic book, Lunkers Love Nightcrawlers, cover the long term care and feeding of nightcrawlers. The Worm Harness A worm harness is nothing more than one or more hooks combined with one or more devices to attract fish. The early Crème worm was a rubber worm on a primitive worm harness. I caught my first lunker bass on this rig. Literally hundreds of commercial harness makers exist and a Ebay search for worm harness or crawler harness will prove it. Cabelas and Bass Pro each carry more than one brand and several varieties for each brand. The sheer number intimidates anglers seeking to try a new method. How can you know which ones work best? For those wanting instant gratification, the “norm” consists of two small hooks, size 2, 4, or 6, snelled on 10 to 20 pound test line. Above the hooks, you will find 3 to 8 beads, and in front of that a size 3 Colorado or Indiana blade. The entire harness will run on a single three to four foot strand of line with a swivel or loop at the end opposite the hooks. Harness Blades Variations abound including those with single hooks; Smile, Dakota, or Willow blades; and even what appears to be a wedding band in the build. To help understand the reason for blade choices I’ve built a chart: Colors A variety of harness colors will work. I suppose you could catch a walleye on anything if you fished long enough with a crawler attached. However, the purpose of the harness is to attract the walleye to find the worm. Certain colors and styles tend to work more consistently. As a side note, the common forage of walleyes in our chain of lakes explains the color choices. Walleye in the White River chain primarily feed on shad and bluegill. As yellow perch, common walleye forage in the North, become more prolific in Bull Shoals, the color choices for that lake may change somewhat. Bodies with chartreuse, red, green, orange, pink, and white are the most commonly used. I own a box of plastic beads I bought from Cabelas for tying traditional harnesses. It contains no less than 24 different shades that are variations on all of the above except white. Traditional harnesses frequently use more than one of these colors. Common blade colors include silver, copper, and air brushed or painted blades using the color palate listed above. While I have had some success with half silver/half gold blades, harnesses with solid gold blades have never proven successful for me. Again, the yellow perch in Bull Shoals may change that. Copper Colorado Blade/Pink Float Beads Silver/Yellow/Red Colorado Blade/Chartreuse Float Beads Silver Willow Blade/Firetiger Float Beads Painted Colorado Blade/White Float Beads (Wonderbread) How and Where In a previous article, Trolling for Table Rock Walleye, I wrote extensively about where and how to locate walleye. I urge you to read or re-read that article for location information. Depth and speed are the other variables that combine with location to determine whether you have success. Fishermen successfully use harnesses for fish holding as shallow as 6 or 8 feet. The harnesses are equally successful on the Great Lakes at 45 feet behind downriggers. For the White River lakes I do not advise downriggers. Instead, those who target walleyes use three way rigs or bottom bouncers. A three way rig utilizes a three way swivel. The main line attaches to one ring, 12 to 24 inches of line with a bell sinker at the end attaches to the second ring. The third ring holds the harness line. Those who use this rig do so because they can quickly change the amount of weight or adjust the height off bottom. I suggest any who use this rig make sure that the strongest of the three lines is the main line to the reel. The second strongest should be the line to the harness. The weight line should be weaker than either of the others. The alternative to a three way rig is a bottom bouncer. The main line attaches at the junction of the “L.” The harness line attaches to the swivel at the end of the unweighted arm. As the boat moves forward the weighted arm tip brushes the bottom while the harness follows behind the weight and somewhat above it. Bottom bouncers come in a variety of weights, ranging from ½ ounce to 4 ounces. What size to use? Traditionalists will tell you to use 1 ounce for every 10 feet of depth you will be fishing. That advice is accurate and useful under normal circumstances, especially when combined with the traditional advice on speed and how much line should be out. If you search the internet for articles on using harnesses and bottom bouncers, almost all will tell you the ideal configuration will have the main line running from the boat to the bouncer at a 45 degrees or less. Those articles also suggest the bouncer should only “bounce” from time to time. These articles are absolutely correct, and professional walleye fishermen use these “rules of thumb” every tournament. The last element of traditional harness fishing is the speed. Most days a speed of .8 mph to 1.4 mph will be the most effective. Be aware the type of blade can change the effective speed. A Willow spins far more easily than a Colorado. A Smile blade can spin with even less speed. You should go at least fast enough to spin the blade. However, the ultimate decision maker on speed will be the fish. Sluggish fish may want a slow presentation. If so the weight will be less and the blade choice would be a Smile or Willow. On other days, hot water fish may need a fast speed to trigger bites. In that case a heavier weight and more line may be needed to reach the depth desired. Chuck’s Secret Method Careful readers may have noticed the pictures of my harnesses above are different from what they see in stores or some of the sketches I have drawn and inserted. The differences are only a part of the “secret” method Chuck Etheredge taught me two years ago. His method is an adaptation of the traditional ways; one that is designed for the highland reservoirs with submerged timber, brush, stumps, car size rocks, and house foundations. Chuck wanted a harness that was less likely to sink when the bottom bouncer stalled because it hit a rock or limb. To that end he substituted floats for the glass or plastic beads. If you put one of his rigs in the water and lay the bouncer on the bottom, the blade slides down to the weight, but the floats, hook, and worm stay up. He also experimented to see if he could avoid exposed hooks. He took from the bass fishermen the idea of Texas rigging the worm. Yes, it is a soft, real nightcrawler, but the embedded hook had to help a little. In addition, one hook point instead of two equaled half as many hang points. He found a worm hook in size 1 or 1/0 was every bit as good as the traditional two small hooks in sticking fish. Last, to keep the float beads and blade from pushing the worm down into a wad, he made another innovation. He uses a bobber stop to hold the beads in place. In addition to changing the harness, Chuck defies conventional wisdom as to bottom bouncer weight. He intentionally uses about half the weight considered standard. At 20 feet he will use one ounce. At thirty feet he will have on a 1.5 or 2 ounce bouncer. To reach the bottom, this means he must have out considerably more line. The change in angle between the boat and the bait is exactly the reason for his unorthodoxy. He believes the “flatter” angle aids in pulling the rig up and over limbs and logs. The combination of differences works for Chuck. On more than occasion I have watched him fish snag filled flats and timbered channel edges with his worm harnesses. Yes he will sometimes hang up, but far less often than anyone would expect. And while he is at it, he catches fish. The first time he showed me his ways, he tried to explain his uncanny success at staying free from hangs. In my words, he does it like this. When he feels the line begin to rub over a limb, he does not jerk. He waits until the line between the limb and harness shortens. As this happens, braid line will sing or vibrate. Quite often the rod tip will feel heavier. Just when he feels the bouncer arm contact the limb, he lifts the rod in a high arc to pop the rig and harness over the limb. He then lets the bouncer fall back to the bottom. Many bites happen on that drop. Please note that Chuck’s method requires the angler to hold the rod and feel for the key moment. This is different from those who put the harness rod in a holder. Results Every article about a fishing method should include a few pictures to vouch for the method and the author. A Table Rock Limit from 2010 when Chuck showed me his secrets Three from June of 2011 My personal best, 13.75 pounds, July 8, 2011, on one of Chuck’s style harnesses.
  10. 2 points
    Mitch f

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    I think these are waterproof!
  11. 2 points
    I’m new here, but I’m in!
  12. 2 points
    Flysmallie

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    Douchebag move if you ask me. This has always went on and all it ever took was Phil saying cut it out. Censorship never makes anything better.
  13. 2 points
    Smalliebigs

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    yep that's lame
  14. 2 points
    Walcrabass

    Bait

    Walleyed Mike, I will be sure to hit my knees when I am at that ramp !!!! Walcrabass
  15. 2 points
    ness

    Just funny stuff

    The Quotes of Steven Wright: 1 - I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize. 2 - Borrow money from pessimists -- they don't expect it back. 3 - Half the people you know are below average. 4 - 99% of lawyers give the rest a bad name. 5 - 82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot. 6 - A conscience is what hurts when all your other parts feel so good. 7 - A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory. 8 - If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain. 9 - All those who believe in psycho kinesis, raise my hand. 10 - The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. 11 - I almost had a psychic girlfriend, ..... But she left me before we met. 12 - OK, so what's the speed of dark? 13 - How do you tell when you're out of invisible ink? 14 - If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something. 15 - Depression is merely anger without enthusiasm. 16 - When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane. 17 - Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy. 18 - Hard work pays off in the future; laziness pays off now. 19 - I intend to live forever ... So far, so good. 20 - If Barbie is so popular, why do you have to buy her friends? 21 - Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines. 22 - What happens if you get scared half to death twice? 23 - My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder." 24 - Why do psychics have to ask you for your name 25 - If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried. 26 - A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. 27 - Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it. 28 - The hardness of the butter is proportional to the softness of the bread. 29 - To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism; to steal from many is research. 30 - The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard. 31 - The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up. 32 - The colder the x-ray table, the more of your body is required to be on it. 33 - Everyone has a photographic memory; some just don't have film. 34 - If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you. 35 - If your car could travel at the speed of light, would your headlights work? Whew! That was a lot of typing! Thanks to whoever did it.
  16. 1 point
    MOPanfisher

    What's Cooking?

    I love Pico and guacamole of just about any variety. I love good ripe avacados sliced and salted also. Tonight my wife has soaked some chicken thighs in buttermilk and my instructions are to fry them up, she will add smashed taters, and some green beans I believe. I will probably make some gravy because well GRAVY!
  17. 1 point
    Mitch f

    Just funny stuff

    Very fair!! 😂
  18. 1 point
    oneshot

    Cast iron

    Funny had a Oriental place I use to like eating. Closed them down because it was found they was serving Cat. Told my wife I knew there was something I liked about the place. Man all the good places are no more. Had German place I liked. It burnt down because they was cooking Meth. oneshot
  19. 1 point
    Bill Babler

    Nature Abounds This Morning

    If you stop feeding them, they will leave and its really hard to get them back. I think the resident birds are creatures of habit and if you stop and they go elsewhere you really have to work at getting them to return. Even when and if we go on vacation we have someone fill the feeders. Thanks Phil Lilley, he has done it for us before. Yes we have never seen PW's except singles and pairs, it was fantastic seeing them in a flock this morning and they are still here.
  20. 1 point
    rps

    White River Walleye on Worm Harnesses

    In 1919, Norman Rockwell painted two covers for successive issues of a magazine called The Country Gentleman. The images are now in the public domain. The Fishing Trip The Catch Even Norman Rockwell knew worms catch the fish. Why many people avoid using worms and insist on artificial baits would make an excellent topic for a psycho-social doctoral thesis. I won’t be writing that. Instead, this article is intended as a primer for fishing worm harnesses in Tablerock and the other White River impoundments. What I will share comes from fellow walleye fishermen who have showed me a number of tricks. In particular, I want to thank Chuck Etheredge of Holiday Island, Arkansas. Chuck holds the Holiday Island Marina walleye record at 14.5 pounds, and he is the one who taught me about his harnesses for brush fishing crawlers. The Bait Nightcrawlers are one of nature’s perfect animals. They aerate the soil, they help break down leaves and other dead matter to soil, and they are so valuable to growing plants that people buy them to put in their gardens. Brown trout guides below Bull Shoals dam say they use red worms because they are “more natural looking in the water.” The real reason is stocker rainbows that can’t and won’t leave the nightcrawlers alone. In the last several years nightcrawlers have become a major farmed and/or harvested crop. Grocery stores, convenience stores, and even Walmarts sell them. Typically, the containers are Styrofoam or cardboard and are filled with potting soil or mulch. I buy at several locations and find the overall quality quite good. However, I always check the contents before I leave the store. Temperature or stock rotation disasters do happen. Next important tip: As soon as you get home, place the worm boxes in the refrigerator and keep them there until the fishing trip. Crawlers will last several weeks if left alone in the bottom drawer of the refrigerator. If you are not the cook, label the boxes “worms” to avoid screams and other domestic difficulties. On the day I intend to use the crawlers, I pack the boxes in an ice chest with ice. The ice will not freeze them in their containers and will keep them cool and lively. Once I am in the boat and ready to fish, I put some ice and lake water in a flat bottom plastic bowl and add four or five crawlers. The ice water plumps them up and washes the dirt off so your boat floor stays cleaner. In addition, you will be in and out of your cooler less often. When the ice melts, merely add another piece or two. An alternative I recently learned was to bathe a day’s worth of crawlers at once, then place them in the now empty Styrofoam containers with ice. In the event you wish to buy crawlers in bulk, they are available from several mail order sources, including Cabelas. Several chapters of the classic book, Lunkers Love Nightcrawlers, cover the long term care and feeding of nightcrawlers. The Worm Harness A worm harness is nothing more than one or more hooks combined with one or more devices to attract fish. The early Crème worm was a rubber worm on a primitive worm harness. I caught my first lunker bass on this rig. Literally hundreds of commercial harness makers exist and a Ebay search for worm harness or crawler harness will prove it. Cabelas and Bass Pro each carry more than one brand and several varieties for each brand. The sheer number intimidates anglers seeking to try a new method. How can you know which ones work best? For those wanting instant gratification, the “norm” consists of two small hooks, size 2, 4, or 6, snelled on 10 to 20 pound test line. Above the hooks, you will find 3 to 8 beads, and in front of that a size 3 Colorado or Indiana blade. The entire harness will run on a single three to four foot strand of line with a swivel or loop at the end opposite the hooks. Harness Blades Variations abound including those with single hooks; Smile, Dakota, or Willow blades; and even what appears to be a wedding band in the build. To help understand the reason for blade choices I’ve built a chart: Colors A variety of harness colors will work. I suppose you could catch a walleye on anything if you fished long enough with a crawler attached. However, the purpose of the harness is to attract the walleye to find the worm. Certain colors and styles tend to work more consistently. As a side note, the common forage of walleyes in our chain of lakes explains the color choices. Walleye in the White River chain primarily feed on shad and bluegill. As yellow perch, common walleye forage in the North, become more prolific in Bull Shoals, the color choices for that lake may change somewhat. Bodies with chartreuse, red, green, orange, pink, and white are the most commonly used. I own a box of plastic beads I bought from Cabelas for tying traditional harnesses. It contains no less than 24 different shades that are variations on all of the above except white. Traditional harnesses frequently use more than one of these colors. Common blade colors include silver, copper, and air brushed or painted blades using the color palate listed above. While I have had some success with half silver/half gold blades, harnesses with solid gold blades have never proven successful for me. Again, the yellow perch in Bull Shoals may change that. Copper Colorado Blade/Pink Float Beads Silver/Yellow/Red Colorado Blade/Chartreuse Float Beads Silver Willow Blade/Firetiger Float Beads Painted Colorado Blade/White Float Beads (Wonderbread) How and Where In a previous article, Trolling for Table Rock Walleye, I wrote extensively about where and how to locate walleye. I urge you to read or re-read that article for location information. Depth and speed are the other variables that combine with location to determine whether you have success. Fishermen successfully use harnesses for fish holding as shallow as 6 or 8 feet. The harnesses are equally successful on the Great Lakes at 45 feet behind downriggers. For the White River lakes I do not advise downriggers. Instead, those who target walleyes use three way rigs or bottom bouncers. A three way rig utilizes a three way swivel. The main line attaches to one ring, 12 to 24 inches of line with a bell sinker at the end attaches to the second ring. The third ring holds the harness line. Those who use this rig do so because they can quickly change the amount of weight or adjust the height off bottom. I suggest any who use this rig make sure that the strongest of the three lines is the main line to the reel. The second strongest should be the line to the harness. The weight line should be weaker than either of the others. The alternative to a three way rig is a bottom bouncer. The main line attaches at the junction of the “L.” The harness line attaches to the swivel at the end of the unweighted arm. As the boat moves forward the weighted arm tip brushes the bottom while the harness follows behind the weight and somewhat above it. Bottom bouncers come in a variety of weights, ranging from ½ ounce to 4 ounces. What size to use? Traditionalists will tell you to use 1 ounce for every 10 feet of depth you will be fishing. That advice is accurate and useful under normal circumstances, especially when combined with the traditional advice on speed and how much line should be out. If you search the internet for articles on using harnesses and bottom bouncers, almost all will tell you the ideal configuration will have the main line running from the boat to the bouncer at a 45 degrees or less. Those articles also suggest the bouncer should only “bounce” from time to time. These articles are absolutely correct, and professional walleye fishermen use these “rules of thumb” every tournament. The last element of traditional harness fishing is the speed. Most days a speed of .8 mph to 1.4 mph will be the most effective. Be aware the type of blade can change the effective speed. A Willow spins far more easily than a Colorado. A Smile blade can spin with even less speed. You should go at least fast enough to spin the blade. However, the ultimate decision maker on speed will be the fish. Sluggish fish may want a slow presentation. If so the weight will be less and the blade choice would be a Smile or Willow. On other days, hot water fish may need a fast speed to trigger bites. In that case a heavier weight and more line may be needed to reach the depth desired. Chuck’s Secret Method Careful readers may have noticed the pictures of my harnesses above are different from what they see in stores or some of the sketches I have drawn and inserted. The differences are only a part of the “secret” method Chuck Etheredge taught me two years ago. His method is an adaptation of the traditional ways; one that is designed for the highland reservoirs with submerged timber, brush, stumps, car size rocks, and house foundations. Chuck wanted a harness that was less likely to sink when the bottom bouncer stalled because it hit a rock or limb. To that end he substituted floats for the glass or plastic beads. If you put one of his rigs in the water and lay the bouncer on the bottom, the blade slides down to the weight, but the floats, hook, and worm stay up. He also experimented to see if he could avoid exposed hooks. He took from the bass fishermen the idea of Texas rigging the worm. Yes, it is a soft, real nightcrawler, but the embedded hook had to help a little. In addition, one hook point instead of two equaled half as many hang points. He found a worm hook in size 1 or 1/0 was every bit as good as the traditional two small hooks in sticking fish. Last, to keep the float beads and blade from pushing the worm down into a wad, he made another innovation. He uses a bobber stop to hold the beads in place. In addition to changing the harness, Chuck defies conventional wisdom as to bottom bouncer weight. He intentionally uses about half the weight considered standard. At 20 feet he will use one ounce. At thirty feet he will have on a 1.5 or 2 ounce bouncer. To reach the bottom, this means he must have out considerably more line. The change in angle between the boat and the bait is exactly the reason for his unorthodoxy. He believes the “flatter” angle aids in pulling the rig up and over limbs and logs. The combination of differences works for Chuck. On more than occasion I have watched him fish snag filled flats and timbered channel edges with his worm harnesses. Yes he will sometimes hang up, but far less often than anyone would expect. And while he is at it, he catches fish. The first time he showed me his ways, he tried to explain his uncanny success at staying free from hangs. In my words, he does it like this. When he feels the line begin to rub over a limb, he does not jerk. He waits until the line between the limb and harness shortens. As this happens, braid line will sing or vibrate. Quite often the rod tip will feel heavier. Just when he feels the bouncer arm contact the limb, he lifts the rod in a high arc to pop the rig and harness over the limb. He then lets the bouncer fall back to the bottom. Many bites happen on that drop. Please note that Chuck’s method requires the angler to hold the rod and feel for the key moment. This is different from those who put the harness rod in a holder. Results Every article about a fishing method should include a few pictures to vouch for the method and the author. A Table Rock Limit from 2010 when Chuck showed me his secrets Three from June of 2011 My personal best, 13.75 pounds, July 8, 2011, on one of Chuck’s style harnesses. View full article
  21. 1 point
    Mitch f

    Just cannot get that mad at em

    Yep nothing worse than a hard pulling fish you never see!
  22. 1 point
    Thanks! I caught them less than 10 minutes apart on a KVD 300 jerkbait. I'd hooked a fish that didn't hardly move 10 minutes before the first one that I'd convinced myself was a foul hooked carp, but I was second guessing myself after catching those 2 off the same area shortly after.
  23. 1 point
    ness

    What's Cooking?

    I love them in my guacamole!
  24. 1 point
    Al Agnew

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    So let me try once again to explain why cfs is preferable... Quite simply, it's a universal language. It's a measure of the volume of water going by a given point at a given time interval. It doesn't change from stream to stream, it's still the same volume of water flow. So if you know what 150 cfs looks like on your favorite stream, you can immediately picture that it looks the same on any other stream. Like I said before, I've never laid eyes on the Little Niangua, but if I decide I want to float it, and look at the gauge and see it's flowing 150 cfs, I can picture that flow in my mind on my home river or any other river that I've floated at that flow, and know it will be similar on the Little Niangua. But if I see that the level on the Little Niangua is 6.0 feet, I have no idea what that means unless I do a lot of sleuthing. 6.0 feet on Big River at Desloge, my home stretch of my home river, is really high, like really honking, three feet or more or above normal and almost certainly muddy as heck--it's about 900 cfs. 6.0 feet on the Little Niangua looks like it's about 110 cfs. That would mean to me that it's going to be easily floatable at the upper end--and if there's a lot of difference between the upper end where the gauge is and a lower section, it might be 200 or more cfs down farther and maybe getting just a LITTLE high. On your home river or another river you're really familiar with and have kept track of what the level in feet signifies, sure, you're comfortable with it and it works perfectly well...for those rivers. But cfs works just as well once you get comfortable with it. And unlike the level in feet, you can translate the cfs to other streams that you're NOT familiar with. Couple that with the median flow, which is shown on the flow in cfs graph, and it's like one stop shopping. You know what normal is for that time of year and you immediately see how close ANY river section is to normal. And actually the little table of daily discharge might be the most useful piece of the whole site, because it tells you the present flow, the median flow (normal) and how low the river CAN get (minimum) and how low it will get during a fairly long dry spell (25th percentile flow) that time of year. Plus, the 75th percentile figure is usually somewhat close to the highest flow that will still be fishable, though that's a lot less reliable. So I look at the Niangua above Lake Niangua gauge for right now and look at that table. Minimum is 182 cfs, which tells me that section of the Niangua will never be too low to float, at least not this time of year. 25th percentile is 224 cfs, and I can picture that in my mind because I know what 200-250 cfs looks like on the Meramec at Steelville, a stream I fish a lot. Median is 349 cfs, and I can picture that too on the Meramec. 75th percentile is 766 cfs. Okay. Right now it's at 1530 cfs. Looks pretty high. I can picture THAT on the Meramec, too, and it's kinda at the extreme upper limit of fishable for the Meramec at Steelville--if it was that high in the middle of the summer I'd be pretty sure it was muddy and too high. The only thing that would make me change my mind is looking at the graph and seeing that the Niangua has been steady at that flow for several days. So while it's higher than I'd prefer, maybe it's clear enough to fish. I can't get ANY of that from looking at level in feet.
  25. 1 point
    Al Agnew

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    Drew, did you float a lot farther downstream than where the gauge is located? That doesn't makes sense that you found it easy floating at that flow, but if you were a day's float downstream, in the section you floated it might have been about double what it was on the gauge...50-80 cfs. I'm just guessing since I'm not familiar with the Little Niangua. That's always a bit of a monkey wrench...not every stream is well covered by gauges. The Bourbeuse drives me nuts because it has two gauges, one on upper end above the usually floatable sections, and one near the lower end. Neither tells you much about the middle portion of the river. And the North Fork is a lot worse yet, since the only gauge is down where it runs into the lake, and tells you absolutely nothing about the river above Rainbow and Double Spring. Gasconade isn't very great, either...highest gauge is at Hazelgreen, which is below the mouth of the Osage Fork so it doesn't tell you a whole lot about the upper river. I thought that maybe the one gauge on the Little Niangua is enough, given the short length of the river, to be fairly good at covering the whole floatable section, but I could be wrong.
  26. 1 point
    Walleyedmike

    Bait

    Looks like I need to proof read a little closer! LOL **Good launches near there! WM
  27. 1 point
    Al Agnew

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    Well, I missed all the drama, so let me address Wrench's question about 75 cfs being floatable no matter what the stream... Here's the deal, Wrench...streams that are big enough and wide enough to make 75 cfs way too low to float...simply never get as low as 75 cfs. The closest one I know that would give you that problem is the lower end of the Buffalo in Arkansas, pretty good sized river with some wide riffles, but it does occasionally get that low by late summer/early autumn. I've floated it at 75 cfs, and there are plenty of wide riffles that you can't float cleanly, and a few that you'll have to get out and walk. Running Clabber Creek Shoals is a matter of picking which rocks you don't mind hitting as much. But the Niangua below Bennett Spring, the James below the mouth of Finley Creek, the Meramec below Maramec Spring, Current River anywhere, Black River below Lesterville, North Fork below the springs...they simply never get that low. So you don't have to worry about whether they are still floatable at 75 cfs. So in reality, the only time that 75 cfs figure comes into play is on streams that DO get too low to float. And on any of those streams, the 75 cfs figure generally holds true. Understand, that's not floating everything cleanly. You will still scrape bottom on some riffles, and if the riffle is really wide compared to the average riffle you might have to walk it. You also might have to walk in split channels. But it's the minimum that's doable without TOO much work. 100 cfs is better and 150-200 is optimal. So yeah, if you tried floating the middle Gasconade at Jerome at 75 cfs it would be bad...but you'll never see anything anywhere close to that low on that stretch of river. And I'll try once again to address some of the other questions in a bit.
  28. 1 point
    Flysmallie

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    He won’t have to worry because censorship like this will be the end of it anyway. Oh well. All good things come to end.
  29. 1 point
    terryj1024

    Bait

    I believe so, It always seems to look like that 😄
  30. 1 point
    BFScott

    Smallies in Pomme?

    Years ago when tournaments in early spring were tough. You could go up the river and catch them. I’m sure the ones you catch now in the lake are transplants from up there. A lot of them are mean mouths. Not to age myself but years ago 83 marina had tournaments with 10 fish limit and if you couldn’t get bit on the main lake then we used to break ice to get up there. There was a group of us that I’m sure over the years brought at least 100 or more to that weigh in. The largest one I can remember being caught was a little over 4lbs that my partner caught.
  31. 1 point
    Mitch f

    What's Cooking?

    AVOCADOS 🥑!!!! looks yummy
  32. 1 point
    Dutch

    Smallies in Pomme?

    Above the McCracken Bridge is the only place I have caught very many.
  33. 1 point
    Out my back door yesterday was rolling waves and a white sandy beach. I was in Panama City Beach, FL heading for the Keys.
  34. 1 point
    liphunter

    Just funny stuff

    I have literally watched and waited 50 years for this!!! After a half century, I was finally right. "This is the year " lol
  35. 1 point
    Smalliebigs

    CFS vs Gauge Height Debate

    bummer dude....don't do that......honestly you are why I come in here every now and then, I need honest and real responses. Don't leave man!!
  36. 1 point
    rps

    Walleye fishing

    Mark, in the mean time, I will try to post the original articles from my files. The trolling file does not have the pictures of the article but does have the text. White River Walleye on Worm Harnesses.pdf TROLLING FOR WHITE RIVER WALLEYE 2 (Autosaved).pdf
  37. 1 point
    rps

    Walleye fishing

    Try the flats on inside bend channel changes. Try steep/deep outside bend channel swings if some sort of cover exists. Post spawn, do not be surprised if they are as shallow as 10 feet. By late August they will be 30 feet deep on the channel edges. The same techniques of which I wrote in articles will work in any semi Southern man made lake. http://www.ozarkanglers.com/white-river-walleye-on-worm-harness/ BTW, Docks that sit on the channel edge will be prime locations for vertical presentations (The cables get in the way of the other methods). Try a white 1 oz War Eagle spoon on 10# braid with 3 to 4 feet of 10# mono joined by a small swivel. That combination twists your line the least. BTW #2, I will put in a message to Phil to ask him to make the links visible again.
  38. 1 point
    You deleted my post because I typed Suzy instead of "Suisilski" (or however he spells it) ? Are you freakin' kidding me ?
  39. 1 point
    Gumboot

    Turd Polishing

    Very impressive work Mrgiggles. For every one of you there multiples of me, that keep Wrench in business. Wrench, once it warms up I'll be dropping off my Nissan 25 with the bent prop shaft. That my boy, who is the only one to run that motor over last two years, has no clue what happened to it.
  40. 1 point
    ness

    Just funny stuff

  41. 1 point
    Ranger Z22

    Just cannot get that mad at em

    The robins are thick up here in Aunts Creek We see them every year seems a little early, but if that is a sign of early spring, all the better. z22
  42. 1 point
    olfishead

    Smallies in Pomme?

    Not many SMB in the lake, but a fair number in the PDT river above the lake. Maybe they are afraid of those large toothy critters! 😁😁
  43. 1 point
    Johnsfolly

    What's Cooking?

    Wasn't sure where this fit best - as a reply to this thread or to my own thread about my harvested deer. Decided to put it here. This is happiness in our home - a tray of cleaned venison shanks and a couple of deboned shoulder roasts going into the freezer (once wrapped of course) Bones for game stock.
  44. 1 point
    Good afternoon to all- I live and fish now on the Gulf coast, but I spent a lot of time fishing and teaching school in the Ozarks. White river, Little Red river, Crooked Creek, Big Piney, and all of the lakes. I do love me some brown bass and trout. I have found that many of the lures and techniques I used up there work just fine down here in the salt water. Just about everything up there eats crawdads, and just about everything down here eats shrimp. Also, soft plastics on 1/4 oz jigheads are deadly for redfish, speck trout, flounder, and lots of other stuff. If you can catch smallmouth bass, you can catch all of the inshore hard-pullers down here. Freshwater anglers worry about corrosion from the salt water, but unless you fully baptize your reels, there's really no problems from fishing the salt. And when fishing the bayous and creeks down here, fish the water just as you would for bass and trout up there. Lot for potholes, dropoffs, deeper structure- that's where the fish are. But I warn you, once you hook a big redfish, you will be ruined. those things pull, and they just keep on pulling. Heck, it's only 12 hours or so from most places in the Ozarks to the coast- you ought to think about coming down and catching some fish and eating some good, good food. you all keep warm- I'm sliding the kayak in a creek in a day or so and looking for reds, specks, and who knows, maybe some baby tarpon. Ed
  45. 1 point
    David Unnerstall

    Lights?

    It ain't camping unless I fire up the old man's Coleman lantern that he had as long as I can remember. He always cussed and beat on it to make it work and when I finally get it lit I look up (I hope it is up) and say "see there Pop."
  46. 1 point
    fishinwrench

    Lights?

    Me too! 2 skunky pointers in the back of a Bronco for 30 miles. Windows down but still so strong our eyes were burning.
  47. 1 point
    snagged in outlet 3

    Lights?

    Yep. Always drive a pickup when going bird hunting. A skunky dog in the back of an SUV is a buzz kill Learned the hard way.
  48. 1 point
    oneshot

    Lights?

    Me and my brother got in trouble playing catch with couple Skunks. For some reason out Step Mother made us wash off in the pond. oneshot
  49. 1 point
    ness

    Cardiac Hill

    And, how do we know he's a king??
  50. 1 point
    ness

    Cardiac Hill

    A king, eh? Well, I didn't vote for him
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