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Oberst

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About Oberst

  • Rank
    Bleeding Shiner
  • Birthday 10/16/1948

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Brentwood, MO
  • Interests
    Fishing, bow hunting, sausage making and smoking.
  1. Hot Crappie Bite!

    Yea Steve, its taken some practice. The worst is not paying enough attention and running into shallow water and hanging all the lines up in a good cross wind. The only way this works is having the lake map chip for my depth finder that shows the contours. Its not exactly correct, but it sure gives your a forward view of where the bottom will be.
  2. I saw the good weather coming up last week and drove down to Stockton to camp at Cedar. Put the AlumaCraft in figured to go after walleye, crappies and blue gills. I never did figure the walleye out; got two keepers, with a bottom bouncer and harness, and jigging a spoon with a minnow head, but few and far between is an understatement. Part of the problem there turned out to be a great crappie bite trolling, and big blue gills too. I ended up focusing on them. And the crappie were overall nice sized too: At first I trolled along the steeper bluffs, and got a fish here and there. I've trolled Stockton before and gotten little so this was no surprise. Frustrating thought given my setup: I can troll four rods at one time so that should up my %. I knew there were fish to be had, from reading this site, and the guys camping down the line from me had a full fish box and they were trolling a couple rods out the side of the boat. I reconsidered my approach, and after seeing a small mouth throw up a 2" shad as I reeled it in switch to smaller lures, and tried the sloping banks without sharp drop offs. That paid off. I ended up focusing my trolling path between 20 and 24 feet. I ran two rods with dipsy divers, one a bottom bouncer, and one a long line out the back. I modified that long line by adding a 2 ounce egg weight 5 feet in front of the lure, so it would run deeper and that paid off. Found that 2mph was a good speed; at 1.6 I wasn't getting nearly as much action. From my tiller seat this was the view to my left: I can easily reach the rods to let line out, take fish in, etc. When I'm pulling in a fish I'll steer the motor with my knee to keep from slamming the other lines into the bottom by wandering too close to shore. Man, I had several triples doing this!! Sure made up for some of the Sahara desert like trips I've had! As to what that post is between the rods: I extended the Bimini top to make a full canopy to the back of the boat. Rain or hot sun are kept where they belong: away from me! Here's the main lure line up: On the left the two divers I used; note the underside of these at top left; you can move the weights so the divers not only take your lure down, but also out to the side. I had them canted out quite a bit to the side. Next is the 2 ounce egg sinker; I tried a 1 ounce sinker and didn't have nearly the success with it. My most successful lures; all had a fast wiggle. I run about 5 feet of line behind the divers; used to go 7 or 8 but what a hassle that is getting a fish in or stowing the rods. Those divers put a pretty good tug on the rod; I use 20 pound braid to the divers and 5 feet of 12 to 15 pound fluoro to the lure. I think you need rod holders to fish the divers as they would wear you out holding on. A fish will often snap the diver release making it easy to pull up, or you can snap the rod to trigger the release. You could easily fish a long line with an egg sinker holding the rod out the side of the boat. Let the line out until the egg hit the bottom and crank up a few times and experiment. I was also prospecting for bluegill, and found them typically at 17-22 feet around structure of some kind. The bottom two lures, one recently posted by lmtout, are heavy enough to drop fast to 20 feet, and have the right hooks for gills. I put a little twister tail on the upper ball, for attraction purposes, and a piece of crawler on the lower smaller hook. Worked great. Also, took off the small treble on the red jig and put on a long panfish hook. Didn't get a ton of these but a couple dozen went into the well. Bright colors don't always work; I can get lazy and not try different things, but this time I was switching here and there, and who would have guessed that bright rainbow and flo orange would be hot? We all know how quickly conditions can change, but in the meantime maybe this helps get a few extra crappie. Those big ones were 12+"; man that is a fun fish to catch!
  3. Hot Crappie Bite!

    I saw the good weather coming up last week and drove down to Stockton to camp at Cedar. Put the AlumaCraft in figured to go after walleye, crappies and blue gills. I never did figure the walleye out; got two keepers, with a bottom bouncer and harness, and jigging a spoon with a minnow head, but few and far between is an understatement. Part of the problem there turned out to be a great crappie bite trolling, and big blue gills too. I ended up focusing on them. And the crappie were overall nice sized too: At first I trolled along the steeper bluffs, and got a fish here and there. I've trolled Stockton before and gotten little so this was no surprise. Frustrating thought given my setup: I can troll four rods at one time so that should up my %. I knew there were fish to be had, from reading this site, and the guys camping down the line from me had a full fish box and they were trolling a couple rods out the side of the boat. I reconsidered my approach, and after seeing a small mouth throw up a 2" shad as I reeled it in switch to smaller lures, and tried the sloping banks without sharp drop offs. That paid off. I ended up focusing my trolling path between 20 and 24 feet. I ran two rods with dipsy divers, one a bottom bouncer, and one a long line out the back. I modified that long line by adding a 2 ounce egg weight 5 feet in front of the lure, so it would run deeper and that paid off. Found that 2mph was a good speed; at 1.6 I wasn't getting nearly as much action. From my tiller seat this was the view to my left: I can easily reach the rods to let line out, take fish in, etc. When I'm pulling in a fish I'll steer the motor with my knee to keep from slamming the other lines into the bottom by wandering too close to shore. Man, I had several triples doing this!! Sure made up for some of the Sahara desert like trips I've had! As to what that post is between the rods: I extended the Bimini top to make a full canopy to the back of the boat. Rain or hot sun are kept where they belong: away from me! Here's the main lure line up: On the left the two divers I used; note the underside of these at top left; you can move the weights so the divers not only take your lure down, but also out to the side. I had them canted out quite a bit to the side. Next is the 2 ounce egg sinker; I tried a 1 ounce sinker and didn't have nearly the success with it. My most successful lures; all had a fast wiggle. I run about 5 feet of line behind the divers; used to go 7 or 8 but what a hassle that is getting a fish in or stowing the rods. Those divers put a pretty good tug on the rod; I use 20 pound braid to the divers and 5 feet of 12 to 15 pound fluoro to the lure. I think you need rod holders to fish the divers as they would wear you out holding on. A fish will often snap the diver release making it easy to pull up, or you can snap the rod to trigger the release. You could easily fish a long line with an egg sinker holding the rod out the side of the boat. Let the line out until the egg hit the bottom and crank up a few times and experiment. I was also prospecting for bluegill, and found them typically at 17-22 feet around structure of some kind. The bottom two lures, one recently posted by lmtout, are heavy enough to drop fast to 20 feet, and have the right hooks for gills. I put a little twister tail on the upper ball, for attraction purposes, and a piece of crawler on the lower smaller hook. Worked great. Also, took off the small treble on the red jig and put on a long panfish hook. Didn't get a ton of these but a couple dozen went into the well. Bright colors don't always work; I can get lazy and not try different things, but this time I was switching here and there, and who would have guessed that bright rainbow and flo orange would be hot? We all know how quickly conditions can change, but in the meantime maybe this helps get a few extra crappie. Those big ones were 12+"; man that is a fun fish to catch! View full article
  4. Planer Board ?

    I use both large and small boards, the bigger boards require a stiffer rod and a bit higher test line. Boards are kind of a pain but they do get your lures out quite a ways. Easier for me and probably as effective over time have been the dipsy divers, which you can turn the weight collar on to take them out to either side of the boat. For boards or divers I recommend rod holders as they both pull pretty good and would tire me out after a while.
  5. Father's Day

    Nice looking Lund too!! Give us a few details!
  6. Trolling report thru June 2

    I leave tomorrow myself for Rainy Lake; last year jigging on open water humps really nailed a lot of nice walleye. Hope to repeat that, along with bruiser northern and smallmouth. Yea, trolling 4 lines is my max. Just fine in open water, but troll near shore, and not pay attention and wander in just a little, and in seconds several of those lines are snagged on bottom. What a pain backing out of that is, especially if there is a good wind!
  7. Fished 4 days thru the second, and while I brought enough fish home for a couple nice fish fries, it was decidedly spotty. The high water always throws me, but figured my best bet was trolling, since I can have four lines running constantly; that has to be several hundred percent more active bait in the water than casting! Just doesn't work out that way a lot of times. Ran two bottom bouncers behind the boat in 20-35 fow with crawler harnesses most of the time and a plug occasionally. Ran a dipsy diver off one side of the boat with a plug or jig, and ran another rod off the other side with a clip on 4 ounce weight and a plug. First day I got a 20+ inch walleye on one of the crawler harnesses within 5 minutes. You know I was thinking "the next few days are going to be awesome!" Boy is that the kiss of death! Here's what boat looked like with 4 rods running: I was targeting walleye and crappie, and fished from about State Park marina up past Cedar Ridge campground to the bridge. Later that first evening I caught two other walleyes and a couple nice crappie and was thinking i was in the ball park anyway. Next two days were tough. I trolled for hours at a time without anything. Trolled around points and back in big bays. I ran the crawler harnesses off the bottom a foot and a half and the plugs off the side of the boat from 10 to 20 feet down. Then I ran some long lines off planer boards and took the whole rig shallower, around 20 feet. A fish here, and there. Most crappie success was on florescent red jointed Rapala and jig with bright orange swim bait about 4 inches long. Got two bass trolling, 13 + 15 inches. Also, I tried my old reliable jigging with a jigging Rap and small spoons in otherwise reliable points and sunken structure, but saw nothing on the graph and caught nothing that way. That stumped me, especially after floating crawlers over nice structure in 20-30 fow. Dang, not even a catfish! Not a single bluegill! A couple days I dodged continuous thunderstorms and had less fishing time. Taking out Friday a.m. a I talked to a fellow was just docking, and he had two walleye that am casting jigs and crawlers to points. That got me thinking that my approach was maybe too preordained, and I should have switched and tried casting more. Looking at the other recent posts I think some of the other techniques mentioned were more effective, given the amount of lure time in the water. Stockton is always a challenge for me, but man I like the scenic peacefulness of the lake! Water was going down pretty quick as I left, so conditions will be altogether different next time I suspect.
  8. Quick Saturday Report

    There is a setting on my Humminbird to lower interference; can't remember what it is but it helped a lot when I upped it.
  9. Dec 5-9 Stockton

    Spent several days at Stockton in the Cedar Creek area, given the weather forecast. I was camping out, and the first morning started with a chill; yikes! Thursday for a last hour and a half of the day I started with minnows in 15-30 feet on a couple points and caught nothing. Figured I might find crappies or a walleye. Friday I cast along flooded brush as I could see other boats doing that. One small smallmouth. Clouds of shad and fish deeper so I trolled down to 50 feet with shad raps, spinner baits, etc. Trolling a spinner bait at 30 feet can't be a usual tactic and I figured fish chasing shad might go for that; they didn't Then did minnows and crawlers on structure with a few bites but nothing. Water temps everywhere around 50. Decided to jig deep; put on a jigging rap and got one walleye in 35 feet. From then on - Sat thru Tues - I decided to stick with jigging, figuring that it's the only way to really fish methodically in deep water, and my live bait wasn't turning up much. Used mostly jigging raps and was in 25 to 35 feet on points and underwater structure. Got some crappie, though I wasn't targeting deep brush piles. Partly because they are a nightmare for exposed hooks. Plus, I wanted some walleye. It worked pretty good; not a ton of fish but every morning and evening I got some; 15-17" size exclusively, plus smaller ones. Just about no bass, which surprised me as I figured there would be some deeper looking for shad. You can see the jigging rap here easily. Note: I tipped the back of the rap with a minnow head or tail. It's slow fishing jigging that deep, but it's all I could figure out. (Snags can kill you; my lure retriever saved a lot of lures but not all.) I tried trolling again after one troller said he got 18 walleye on flicker shads one day, with several keepers. Man, my Alumacraft is set up for trolling better than his boat was but it did me no good running multiple lines all the way down deep. Other days I talked to trollers who had zip. At least thought I'd have fun with white bass, etc going through the huge shad schools but nope. My jigging rap seemed to play itself out by my last day and I couldn't find fish, so I switched to a spoon. Plus I lost most of my raps by then and the wind picked up so I needed something heavy to keep bottom contact. Got a few walleye, a bass and a couple crappie that way. By then I had to go and my trolling batteries were dead as can be. Jigging best works straight up and down; a bow in the line makes that presentation hard and not very effective. I have fished Stockton multiple times over the last couple years and found it a hard lake to figurer a pattern for anything. This was one of my more successful trips, but I really had to put in the hours and only by going to the bottom and sticking with it did my luck change. I never really fished for bass, and a lot of boats were; tossing Alabama rigs along brush and shoreline. Saw some fish caught not a lot. Wish I could have figured out the crappie as I know they are down there but that will be for another time. And there should be a way to get some fish off those shad schools, but beats me. tom boat
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