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Phil Lilley

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Phil Lilley last won the day on November 2

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About Phil Lilley

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    Fisher
  • Birthday 09/19/1958

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    http://ozarkanglers.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Upper Lake Taneycomo
  • Interests
    Pursuit of God, His majesty, His greatness--with all of my heart, soul and might.

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  1. Didn't know what to title this topic... Taney's not turning but Table Rock is. Temp was 61 a couple of days ago. 58.9 this morning and 58.3 at 4 when we did One Cast. Fishing was dead this morning... now, shad in the water this afternoon and fish are killing it. Debated to just do OC from the dock and not go out in the wind and snow... glad we ran to the dam. Excited for the next few days. Hopefully it's not another flash in the pan like we had on Saturday. Fishing got hot, saw a bunch of shad... then it dried up. Tough bite. No shad. But with this cold front and wind, TR's temp should drop on out and the lake should mix.
  2. Came from over the top. That’s their first stop, resting I bet. Should be an interesting next 30 days or so.
  3. I don't think this will change much... not big enough flow. The big flows do move gravel around some but even then not much. May see some change at the Narrows. Seems like that's the spot that gravel moves the most.
  4. Duane just sent me a pic of threadfin shad he's seen up below the dam this morning. That means Table Rock is starting to mix. The water temps were 59 from under and 61 from over and dam. Cold nights, wind I'm sure has dropped the surface temp down even more so it's going to happen real quick, seeing temps aren't going to reach the 60's starting Tuesday in the near future. Teens at night and 30's and 40's daytime. The shad will trigger some fantastic feeding and catching now for quite a while. The scuds are already booming. TR turning almost 30 days early... man it's going to be an incredible winter season here.
  5. Catching today wasn't too good, at least for me. Too much junk in the water this morning and just tough this afternoon. But the 2 rainbows I caught, both below Lookout and caught on scuds, were fatter than a tick, probably with scuds.
  6. I'm expecting an email any minute... from the Corps telling us about the 4 inches of rain that fell in NW Arkansas and SW Missouri and the plan to release a bunch of water from Beaver and TR Dams. Beaver is rising but not as fast as Table Rock which is at 918.4 feet. They've already increased flow at Table Rock but it's hard to tell how much. Taney's level is at 709.6 but they're only running 4,800 cfs through the turbines. I got an email yesterday saying that the Corps was starting to work on the head gates which means they can't run some turbines. So almost all the flow is coming over the spill gates. Yesterday I took water temps. The water coming over the dam is 61. The water coming through the turbines is 59. DO is over 10 ppm which is excellent. The 2 degrees difference between the two means Table Rock is very close to turning over. Next week's cold snap should start the process. When Table Rock hits 920 feet, the Corp will start releasing 20,000 cfs. That's the equivalent of 5 units. If you don't mind the flow, fishing should be excellent, fishing with shad flies, white jigs and scuds.
  7. Shane Bush, Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries Biologist for Table Rock and Taneycomo, sent me this PDF file of a presentation given last week by Gabe Knight. Gabe works for the Little Rock Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It has some good straight forward information on how and why releases are made, encompassing all of the White River Water Basin. Water Management Overview Knight_2019.pdf
  8. Shane Bush, Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries Biologist for Table Rock and Taneycomo, sent me this PDF file of a presentation given last week by Gabe Knight. Gabe works for the Little Rock Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It has some good straight forward information on how and why releases are made, encompassing all of the White River Water Basin. Water Management Overview Knight_2019.pdf
  9. I'd never gone up to Naknek this late... not many people have except locals I'm told. And even then, didn't see but a couple of boats on the river today. Stayed at Katmai Trophy Lodge near the "rapids" on the Naknek, owned by the Johnson family. They also own Naknek River Camp at the head of the river, at Lake Camp. The camp is closed because all their water lines are exposed, above ground. KTL is a regular lodge with power (electricity) and indoor plumbing so they could stay open all year, if there was fishing to be had. I went up to spend time with good friend, John McCloskey, one of their main guides at KTL. John did a spey casting clinic for us at the resort last December. John had 3 clients this week from Georgia. They are clients of his on his home waters in north GA. Jason, Jane and their 9 year old son John. John specializes is swinging flies and the Cooke's were there to partake. The river was a little high and off color due to rains and an east wind. John says the rainbows don't like dirty water. Water temp was 43-44 degrees. We had a variety of weather. Three days of winds in excess of 40 mph and a couple "breezy" days. Rain everyday except one. But temps stayed decent - 45 - 53 degrees daytime and rarely dropped below 40 at night. Unseasonably warm, but always windy and rainy. I'd call it normal RAW Alaska weather for late October. Fishing was good the first day in spite of heavy winds but the bite steadily slowed down each day, like the rainbows were leaving the river. We were seeing some flesh flowing by but not much. Nothing else for them to eat really except may be a sculpin here and there. They winter in Naknek Lake and will migrate there about now. John says they stated one week too long. But the rainbows we did catch were impressive. They swung flesh and sculpins and I threw my spinning gear and 1/8th ounce jigs. I used mostly 4-pound line but did use 6-pound occasionally. The bigger the rainbow and easier they were to land, mainly because they were so fat with flesh. We fished flats - fast water spots with depressions and rocks holding fish and depths not more than 3 feet deep. That's what made my jig work, they hit it even if it was real close to the surface - and the swing or worked out in front of me. I landed 3 - 30+inch bows, 6 bows between 25 and 29, one at 20 and 2 about 15 inches. I lost a couple - one at the net and one broke off. The best color was black/purple and sculpin/ginger a close second. John played around with the jig and loved it. He couldn't get over how effective it was. I know he hooked several rainbows and landed one that I saw. They caught a half dozen swinging flies. I know Jason landed a couple pushing 30 inches. They saw one bear. I wasn't fishing at the time though so I didn't see it. We didn't fish any other areas - stay below the Counting Towers and across from King Island. There were 2 other guide boats out all week with 2 clients each... that's it.
  10. I'd never gone up to Naknek this late... not many people have except locals I'm told. And even then, didn't see but a couple of boats on the river today. Stayed at Katmai Trophy Lodge near the "rapids" on the Naknek, owned by the Johnson family. They also own Naknek River Camp at the head of the river, at Lake Camp. The camp is closed because all their water lines are exposed, above ground. KTL is a regular lodge with power (electricity) and indoor plumbing so they could stay open all year, if there was fishing to be had. I went up to spend time with good friend, John McCloskey, one of their main guides at KTL. John did a spey casting clinic for us at the resort last December. John had 3 clients this week from Georgia. They are clients of his on his home waters in north GA. Jason, Jane and their 9 year old son John. John specializes is swinging flies and the Cooke's were there to partake. The river was a little high and off color due to rains and an east wind. John says the rainbows don't like dirty water. Water temp was 43-44 degrees. We had a variety of weather. Three days of winds in excess of 40 mph and a couple "breezy" days. Rain everyday except one. But temps stayed decent - 45 - 53 degrees daytime and rarely dropped below 40 at night. Unseasonably warm, but always windy and rainy. I'd call it normal RAW Alaska weather for late October. Fishing was good the first day in spite of heavy winds but the bite steadily slowed down each day, like the rainbows were leaving the river. We were seeing some flesh flowing by but not much. Nothing else for them to eat really except may be a sculpin here and there. They winter in Naknek Lake and will migrate there about now. John says they stated one week too long. But the rainbows we did catch were impressive. They swung flesh and sculpins and I threw my spinning gear and 1/8th ounce jigs. I used mostly 4-pound line but did use 6-pound occasionally. The bigger the rainbow and easier they were to land, mainly because they were so fat with flesh. We fished flats - fast water spots with depressions and rocks holding fish and depths not more than 3 feet deep. That's what made my jig work, they hit it even if it was real close to the surface - and the swing or worked out in front of me. I landed 3 - 30+inch bows, 6 bows between 25 and 29, one at 20 and 2 about 15 inches. I lost a couple - one at the net and one broke off. The best color was black/purple and sculpin/ginger a close second. John played around with the jig and loved it. He couldn't get over how effective it was. I know he hooked several rainbows and landed one that I saw. They caught a half dozen swinging flies. I know Jason landed a couple pushing 30 inches. They saw one bear. I wasn't fishing at the time though so I didn't see it. We didn't fish any other areas - stay below the Counting Towers and across from King Island. There were 2 other guide boats out all week with 2 clients each... that's it. This post has been promoted to an article
  11. Had to edit the report, since they SHUT the water off this morning. Big rains moving in which will, again, change things. It's hard writing any report seeing conditions change so often.
  12. Generation patterns on Lake Taneycomo have changed since my last fishing report. Spill gates have shut down and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has gone back to running generators for much of the day and some nights. Oxygen levels remain decent and water temperatures steady at about 57 degrees. Water clarity has dropped, though, which is good for us anglers. We talked about using two-pound line for months because our water was so clear -- but not anymore. Four-pound line is fine for almost all applications. Flows have been pretty consistent, running 6,500 and 8,600 cubic feet per second of water, or the equivalent of 1.5 to two units of water. Table Rock is 916.8 feet above sea level and dropping slightly. With the current flow, it's just keeping up with inflows caused by rains and some water from Beaver Lake which is a little high at 1,126 feet. As fate has it, they shut the water down today but I'm afraid it's going to short-lived. Quite a bit of rain is forecasted for the next 4-5 days which, if we get it, will bring the lakes up and more generation. At these medium flows, wading below the dam is very limited, mainly at the outlets and along the bank in some areas. I've seen some guys wading below outlet #3 at deep depths, going out in current to their waist which, in my opinion, is unnecessary and dangerous. No fish is worth getting swept downstream, putting you and may be someone else trying to help rescue you at risk. Be wise. Drifting #12 gray, brown and orange scuds from the cable down to Trout Hollow has been pretty successful this week, along with egg flies and San Juan worms. Fish them under a float or using a drift rig or just a split shot; either is fine. We're still doing pretty well throwing white jigs in and below the trophy area. Sculpin jigs and black jigs are producing well, too. Drifting night crawlers below Fall Creek is netting some really nice rainbows, according to Guide Bill Babler. The stretch between Fall Creek and Short Creek has been the best. Guide Steve Dickey has been doing well using the pink PowerWorm under a float six- to nine-feet deep from above Monkey Island through the bridges. The wind has made drifting and fishing pretty tough in general the last few days but that should change shortly. View full article
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