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Phil Lilley

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Everything posted by Phil Lilley

  1. Sadly, Waino might be done. Not a good way to go out. They looked at strikes and swung at balls. They need to go up and swing aggressively the rest of the series. They can do no worse.
  2. Sounds like you guys figured it out. TR is dropping now. Might be at 917 by tomorrow or earlier. All it has to drop is .37 of a foot.
  3. Always loos brown after a rain like that. But it clears quickly.... flushes out. Nice to be a tailwater. Table Rock's at 917.45 this morning. They'll run this flow till it drops down past 917 feet. Flood gates that equal 2 units. Turbine release at 2 units. Lake level is at 710 feet - about right for 4 units.
  4. Table Rock has almost crested. They will run gates till TR drops below 927 feet
  5. 3 gates now readings: Spill side - 68.7 highest and 8.8 ppm DOTurbine side - 57.7 highest and 4.3 ppm DO wind was tough! No fish caught. Saw one caught on a red San Juan worm (Rolan Duffield)
  6. Shane said this should help DO levels. We'll see what the water temp is. Should dump some shad in... and other fish at least right at the beginning.
  7. 2 gates will open today at noon 1 foot each. Email from the Corps: Table Rock Dam is required to make small releases from the gates due to power generation issues. The release will not exceed typical power generation releases.Gates 3 and 5 will open to one foot (1') each around 1200 today. The total spillway flow will be approximately 2,000 dsf . The total release combined with hydropower will be approximately 11,000 dsf.
  8. I heard about this... not good. Heard traffic is backed up big time = sending it through residential Hollister. That'll take a while to fix too. We got clear water moving down the lake this morning. DD is guiding and catching trout up lake. As for Table Rock, texting Shane Bush this morning about the possibility of flood gates. He said TR is cooling down real fast and that the water at the dam 40 feet down shouldn't be too bad. So flood gates might not be a bad thing after all. It would help the DO for sure. Back in 09, a lot of browns disappeared after that event. That's why MDC upped the number stocked for several years after that.
  9. Our rain gage holds 5 inches - it was overflowing this morning. Thankfully the heaviest rain is east of us but still... TR’s basin got 3-4 inches last night. If TR gets to 919-920, look for flood gates. That may spell disaster for our brown trout, as it did in September 2009 when they opened gates. One good thing is TR’s temperature should be cooler this time which may help alot.
  10. I'm REALLY surprised more people haven't voted. If TU gets it, we'll have a vote-off to see which chapter gets it. That'd be fun. You smallmouth guys need to get on the stick - get the word out.
  11. I added the amount to the title. Come on... call your friends and have them vote. That's a lot of money!!
  12. As promised, this poll will decide who will receive google ad money from this site. We will write a check for September's take to the one who gets the most votes. Voting ends midnight Sunday, October 13th. In case of a tie, we'll have a one day vote-off.
  13. We've had a lot of conversations about old Wiggle Warts.
  14. We have a solid core of anglers who are great guys and gals... hope you become a regular poster. Welcome.
  15. Anyone see this coming? And it's still raining. Those of us below dams are hoping we don't see heavy generation seeing the water quality we'll get won't be conducive to... fish. Fortunately there's lots of room in the lakes, at least right now. Wonder how far Beaver will rise? Table Rock?
  16. In light of this rain we're having, I'll share this email I got the other day. I don't understand all of it but one thing I do. If they get in a spot where they have to release a lot of water, it'll be bad for the fishery below BS dam. Due to poor water quality conditions and maintenance on hydropower units, we are unable to make the authorized flood risk management releases without causing damage to the trout fishery. Because of this we perused a deviation from the water control plan to reduce releases and maintain acceptable D.O. and temperature levels below Bull Shoals and Norfork dams. The deviation will result in stages at Newport falling below 12 ft and prolonged empty dates at Bull Shoals and Norfork. Below is a summary of current actions taken to improve tailwater D.O. conditions:Beaver:- open vacuum breaker ventsTable Rock:- open vacuum breaker vents- ongoing LOX injection- effective without LOX RMGRBull Shoals:- open vacuum breaker vents- effective RMGR- reduced releases below authorized amountsNorfork:- open vacuum breaker vents- effective RMGR- 24 hr siphon operation- reduced releases below authorized amountsGreers Ferry:- open vacuum breaker ventsAll actions taken have worked to improve the water quality below the dams, however, as conditions continue to degrade our options will become fewer. We do not anticipate any significant impact to the fishery at this time but October rainfall could further complicate the situation. Feel free to give me call if you have any questions.
  17. Me and DD are probably in...
  18. Missed the introduction... but glad I'm caught up. Thanks for joining and posting. Fish pics are always welcome!
  19. I don't think you'll see 3 units like today... back to the 35 mw all day after it cools off. We'll see .
  20. Summer has stuck around late this fall (yes it has officially been autumn for a week now despite the 90-plus degree weather.) But we know the splendor of fall colors is just weeks away! It looks like we're in for a cool change this week. We've received a little heavy generation already this week, I assume because of the hot weather. It sure was nice, though, moving a lot of loose pond weed and other floating scum out of our area of the lake. That's one nice thing about being on a tail water -- we get new water every time operators run water at the dam. They're still running that minimum flow 24/7 as they have been since September 1st. No word of any changes on the horizon. Dissolved oxygen levels have been holding up pretty well, and water temperatures are about 57 degrees. When they do switch modes and start leaving the water off, I think we'll see no generation for most of the time and little generation until cold weather dominates our days and nights. The San Juan worm continues to be the hot item this week, mentioned on social media many times as the go-to fly. The best colors are pink and red in the micro version, which is basically a small diameter chenille tied on a #14 or #16 hook. The material is called micro chenille . . . go figure. Most fly fishers are using the micro San Juan in a double fly rig under an indicator. They're using a heavier fly up from the San Juan about 18- to 24-inches from, say, a weighted scud or a beaded midge. But you could use a beaded version of a San Juan by itself since the bead would take the fly down where it needs to be. You want to fish the worm, and scuds for that matter, on the bottom when drifting along in the current, so set the indicator at a depth where the flies rake across the bottom. If your flies are coming back with Taneycomo slime, move the indicator so that you're not fishing as deep. But you'll drift across shallow and deep areas, holes and flats, and will need to pick a good average depth to cover as much water as possible. Our dockhand Blake Wilson has been fly fishing quite a bit, scoring really well using a double scud rig. He's fishing a peppy scud (medium gray), two sizes under a float and drifting from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run. He ties the smaller scud, usually a #16 or #18, as the bottom fly and a larger #14 on top, separating them by about 18 inches. He's using 6x fluorocarbon tippet. As far as where to fish either of these rigs, any fairly shallow gravel flats are best, and you'll find those areas from the dam down to Trout Hollow Resort. From Fall Creek to Trout Hollow, stay towards the inside of the bend. Drifting real worms is still the best way to catch trout below the trophy area. These two things will help you catch more fish. First, your weight. Your weight needs to match the flow of generation. When you throw the rig out, how long does it take to hit the bottom? If it goes right to the bottom, and you feel it catch and pull, you're using too much weight. Depending on the depth of water, of course, it should take a few seconds to reach the bottom, and you should feel a slight touch every once in a while. When this happens, you know your bait is skimming across the bottom like a natural worm would. Plus when a fish picks it up, you'll feel it immediately. With the present generation, all you really need is a small split shot to get your bait to the bottom. And less is better. Even if your bait isn't on the bottom all the time, it will get eaten. With too much weight you will only catch, snag and grow frustrated. The second thing is how you present your worm. Don't use the whole worm. No need to thread it, although that’s not a bad option -- it just takes too much time and is unnecessary. Pinch the worm in two. Take the piece and run your hook through the middle, letting it hang off each side. No need to hide the hook. I use a #8 short shank bronze hook by the way. And four-pound line is fine when drifting.
  21. Summer has stuck around late this fall (yes it has officially been autumn for a week now despite the 90-plus degree weather.) But we know the splendor of fall colors is just weeks away! It looks like we're in for a cool change this week. We've received a little heavy generation already this week, I assume because of the hot weather. It sure was nice, though, moving a lot of loose pond weed and other floating scum out of our area of the lake. That's one nice thing about being on a tail water -- we get new water every time operators run water at the dam. They're still running that minimum flow 24/7 as they have been since September 1st. No word of any changes on the horizon. Dissolved oxygen levels have been holding up pretty well, and water temperatures are about 57 degrees. When they do switch modes and start leaving the water off, I think we'll see no generation for most of the time and little generation until cold weather dominates our days and nights. The San Juan worm continues to be the hot item this week, mentioned on social media many times as the go-to fly. The best colors are pink and red in the micro version, which is basically a small diameter chenille tied on a #14 or #16 hook. The material is called micro chenille . . . go figure. Most fly fishers are using the micro San Juan in a double fly rig under an indicator. They're using a heavier fly up from the San Juan about 18- to 24-inches from, say, a weighted scud or a beaded midge. But you could use a beaded version of a San Juan by itself since the bead would take the fly down where it needs to be. You want to fish the worm, and scuds for that matter, on the bottom when drifting along in the current, so set the indicator at a depth where the flies rake across the bottom. If your flies are coming back with Taneycomo slime, move the indicator so that you're not fishing as deep. But you'll drift across shallow and deep areas, holes and flats, and will need to pick a good average depth to cover as much water as possible. Our dockhand Blake Wilson has been fly fishing quite a bit, scoring really well using a double scud rig. He's fishing a peppy scud (medium gray), two sizes under a float and drifting from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run. He ties the smaller scud, usually a #16 or #18, as the bottom fly and a larger #14 on top, separating them by about 18 inches. He's using 6x fluorocarbon tippet. As far as where to fish either of these rigs, any fairly shallow gravel flats are best, and you'll find those areas from the dam down to Trout Hollow Resort. From Fall Creek to Trout Hollow, stay towards the inside of the bend. Drifting real worms is still the best way to catch trout below the trophy area. These two things will help you catch more fish. First, your weight. Your weight needs to match the flow of generation. When you throw the rig out, how long does it take to hit the bottom? If it goes right to the bottom, and you feel it catch and pull, you're using too much weight. Depending on the depth of water, of course, it should take a few seconds to reach the bottom, and you should feel a slight touch every once in a while. When this happens, you know your bait is skimming across the bottom like a natural worm would. Plus when a fish picks it up, you'll feel it immediately. With the present generation, all you really need is a small split shot to get your bait to the bottom. And less is better. Even if your bait isn't on the bottom all the time, it will get eaten. With too much weight you will only catch, snag and grow frustrated. The second thing is how you present your worm. Don't use the whole worm. No need to thread it, although that’s not a bad option -- it just takes too much time and is unnecessary. Pinch the worm in two. Take the piece and run your hook through the middle, letting it hang off each side. No need to hide the hook. I use a #8 short shank bronze hook by the way. And four-pound line is fine when drifting. View full article
  22. OAF will donation September's Google Ad check to a conservation group of your choice. You have today and tomorrow (Monday and Tuesday) to suggest a conservation group, any group. Then I will create a poll and you, our members, will vote.
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