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Phil Lilley

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Everything posted by Phil Lilley

  1. Email from David Pitt: We've added a new feature that will notify you, with a text message, when water generation changes up or down... Text "w table" to 913-270-0360 and you will be texted current generation when release/discharge changes. You can still text "g table" and "s table" to get current and scheduled generation. It supports all tailwater's on the white river system, bull, beaver, littlered, norfork, and more... Here's a web site with more documentation on this utility. Feel free to share. https://keyholelabs.com/convo/cfswater Thanks, David Pitt
  2. Phil Lilley

    New CORPS notification for tailwaters

    What are you trying to find, Dan?
  3. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    Our flight was pretty much full... but I'm sure the tourist travel to Iceland will slow down very soon.
  4. What do you think of when someone says you’re going to Iceland? My wife, son and sis-in-law planned this trip a year ago and here we are in the middle of a ten day tour. Spent 3 days in Reykjavík. Fascinating city. Almost every building is made on concrete. Got in the country yesterday. Wasn’t what I expected. Rolling plains with mountains always in view. Lots of sheep and horses and few cattle. Farms are large and spread apart. Good road system. Climate isn’t far from ours. A little less daylight right now. Language is very difficult, both hearing and reading. But almost everyone speaks English too. This is a headwater rivers runs into one of the largest lakes in Iceland. I saw 30-36 inch Brown’s everywhere spawning. No fishing. Area is protected.
  5. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    Ice caving today. It was cool in more ways than one, but after it was said and done, I'd say the company needs to do a better job of letting clients know the risks. Our guide, a nice guy - common sense kind of guy - only does this part time. The last time he'd done a tour was 2 weeks ago. These caverns are created when small lakes form on top of the glacier, then gets flushed down through a hole made at the bottom and then out the side or end of the glacier wall. These "caves" don't last long. The collapse due to melting. And if you were in or near one when it did... you'd be dead. The guide was spooked, especially when we walked over to a water fall that was up in a small cavern (no pics, just a video). We had to walk up into a cavern, not a cave, but the walls were high and there were chunks of ice dangling above our heads. About the time we got up in there, he was telling everyone to turn around and head out. Of course, not many paid any attention. Standing out where it was "safe", he told me 2 weeks ago the wall of the glacier and the water fall was 10 meters closer. In another words, the water fall had moved, and lots of ice had fell and melted, more than 25 feet. Walking back to the bus, the guide said he wasn't coming back again this year... it was too dangerous. He didn't think the cave would last much longer. Another little thing that happens - when these "lakes" drain out, they usually drain out all at once causing a flash flood. Depending on the size of lake, the river of water could be substantial. Last year, a flash flood cut some tourists off from their bus for about 2 hours. Not sure I want to be in that business...
  6. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    OK... I checked on a fishing trip for Friday. Not many outfitters fishing right now I guess. Contacted a couple and they said season was over for them. Last one said it was "prime" for char on the Varma River between Hella and Reykjavik. Said they could pick me up in Hella, where we're staying tomorrow night, and supply waders, equipment and license for 1190 Euro. I'll let you google what that is in the usd. I said no thank you.
  7. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    Yes we did. $600 non stop out of St Louis. Not bad... Greg was searching google flights the other day and said we could fly to London for $100 round trip from here if we wanted to... Not this time.
  8. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    They do charge for all plastic bags... like in grocery stores. Good idea
  9. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    All heating here is from geothermal water. It's pumped in and runs through radiators in each room. Hot water is also heated by the same. All electricity is generated by geothermal too
  10. Phil Lilley

    Iceland

    This is a headwater rivers runs into one of the largest lakes in Iceland. I saw 30-36 inch Brown’s everywhere spawning. No fishing. Area is protected.
  11. Phil Lilley

    2018 CT Carp Classic Open

    I'm not sure what's going on with you guys but it's annoying. Seriously.
  12. Phil Lilley

    More flooding at Montauk

    Spammer... I deleted the post and the quote - so that the links are not live on the site. Thanks for the heads up.
  13. Phil Lilley

    TR for this upcoming weekend

    So that was you guys I saw a little while ago... sorry I didn't recognize you all. I actually thought it was another guy, a local. I struggled out there this evening.
  14. Phil Lilley

    Observations, 10/4

    Megaworm... I'm really not the one to tell you cause i haven't fished it that much. I did today though and while I was fishing it, I thought "I need to write or video something on this thing". Confirmation! Today while the water was coming on, I fished a white one under a float 8 feet deep and fished along the bluff bank across from Short Creek - caught 2 rainbows and missed another. Jeremy Hunt is probably the best to say and I'll ask him next time I talk to him. He catches a lot of trout on it here and in Arkansas. I've sighted fish for trout using it, throwing it in shallow water and twitching it back, watching for it to disappear. I'll get on this and try to have something before I leave next week on vacation.
  15. Phil Lilley

    Observations, 10/4

    First - temp and DO levels. Note the rise and fall (blue lines). It correlates to generation and daylight. Night time is the lowest and rises when they turn the water on. It also heads up after dawn. This is down by our place. Note the drop AFTER they started running this hard generation. It basically pushed the colder but low DO water down from the upper end. I caught a couple of rainbows yesterday that didn't fight well but only 2 out of 18. The rest fought well. Why are they running it like this? I have no idea. I did ask that question a couple of weeks ago when they were running 35 mw 24/7 and didn't get an answer. Scuds are king in the trophy area. Brown, or mink, has been the best color the last couple of days. And bigger ones - #14's or even #12's. And using 6x tippet again... ditched the 7x. I fished late morning today from above the dock to almost the bend up lake on the shallow side. Started throwing a sculpin/burnt orange/orange head 1/16th oz jig, 2-pound line and caught some real pretty rainbows. Did One Cast. Then I got the fly rod out and fished a mink scud, #14, under a float 6 feet deep and caught 6 rainbows - missed several others. Switched to a brown #16 zebra midge under a float 5 feet and caught a couple. Then I tied on a medium mega worm, cream. It's not the big fluffy mega but a medium (thinner) worm tied at the head only with a nickel bead, not a jig hook. I bought them from a guy who sells a lot of flies to the trout parks. They worked real good! Fished them deep enough to get to the bottom. Missed more strikes than I connected with though. I think they were taking them short. One rainbow I caught had a half dozen brown and gray snails in its mouth. I noted most of the trout had big bellies... are they all eating snails now!? Interesting.
  16. Phil Lilley

    Corp Site

    Lake Levels - http://www.nwk.usace.army.mil/Locations/DistrictLakes/StocktonLake/DailyLakeInformation.aspx Bush Piles - http://mdc.mo.gov/sites/default/files/resources/2010/05/6202_4066.pdf Lake Map - http://www.stocktonlake.com/pages/map http://www.nwk.usace.army.mil/Portals/29/docs/lakesites/stockton/2011BrochureST9-7.pdf http://www.ozarkanglers.com/stockton/maps/ https://huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/fishing/where-fish/fish-attractor-gpx-files
  17. Phil Lilley

    Observations, 10/4

    Yes I do. I have them on a 220R hook as well as the 3769. I wrap a small copper wire over the dubbing too.
  18. Phil Lilley

    Night Time Fly Fishing Trip Report - 10/1

    Just for fun, sit and watch the "fishing" in outlet #2 for a while. Note the ratio of legal hookups verses foul hooked hookups. Fouls will win. But what I noticed is that these were "normal" drift-stop-set hookups and not throw-and-jerk (for the most part). The guys using 2 flies snagged fish almost every time. So it's not necessarily the fault of the angler foul hooking fish... it's the nature of the beast - fishing the outlet. So many fish there that you can't help but snag. Keeping a foul hooked fish... that person lacks a moral conscience. He's gotta believe it's ok to do it and block out the fact in his own mind that it's illegal plus it doesn't take much skill to run a line of hooks over a back and catch a fin.
  19. Well autumn is finally arriving here -- at least we hope we all are done with summer high temperatures. We've received good rains lately and everything is green again. The trees are starting to show a little color on the bluffs, and the fall flowers are in full blooms along the lake. Trout fishing on Taneycomo stayed pretty strong all summer. We usually see water conditions deteriorate as fall approaches -- the dissolved oxygen drops, and water temperature rises -- but we haven't seen hardly any of that yet. The lake temperature is holding at about 52 degrees, and the water is very clear. Generation has varied; weather and temperature seem to dictate how much and how long dam operators run water. Since its grown cooler, they've been running water for two to three hours late in the afternoon and only running one to two units. Our brown trout move up in the lake in fall months to spawn. They actually don't spawn successfully, but do go through the motions. We are seeing a good number of browns already up below the dam, some being caught up near the hatchery outlets. Guide Chuck Gries told me clients are hooking most browns when wading and fly fishing below the dam. Most of these browns are on the small side, but several in the 22 - to 26-inch range have been brought in. Guide Tony Weldele has been seeing some very large browns moving up, staging in the Narrows area. These browns are almost always on the move and won't stay in one area for very long. Browns and rainbows are being caught on scuds, sow bugs, egg flies and sculpin streamers. I know other flies are good, too, including cracklebacks, WD40's, san juan worms, mega worms, soft hackles and woolybuggers. Night fishing has been very good throwing big streamers, as well as the miracle fly and scuds under a glowing indicator. Thursday morning I fished the Narrows area with no generation. Since it was almost 9 a.m., the sun was already up over most of the area. Struggling for most of the morning, I tried larger scuds (12's and 14's) in gray and brown with no takers. I stripped a sculpin woolybugger for a while with not even one chaser. It wasn't until I changed to 7x tippet and a #18 gray scud that I started picking up trout. I also tried and caught a few on a #18 primrose -n- pearl zebra midge under a float 30 inches deep. It was sunny with hardly any wind, so conditions were tough. When fishing the bigger flies, the fish would come and look, then turn away. But later when I reduced the size of everything, I was able to target feeding rainbows, especially close to the bank and on the shallow flats. This is why they are digging around in the gravel and along the banks: Scud flies come in lots of sizes, shapes and colors. We tie most of them using natural fur of various kinds -- squirrel, rabbit, mink, muskrat, dog and cat . . . even kangaroo! Each one has a different texture and ties differently on a hook. They also act differently in water. The shape depends on the style of hook used, whether long, short, curved or straight. And, of course, the size depends on the size of hook. We add weight using very thin lead wire wrapped around the hook or thin brass or copper wire wrapped around the fur to give the fly a segmented look. Once the fur is applied and the fly is done, a small wire brush is used to comb the fibers down, creating the legs under the bug. Excess fibers are trimmed on top -- although my example scuds aren't combed and trimmed very well. I observed scuds in tan, gray, olive and brown colors while raising them in an aquarium several years ago. In the evenings when water has been running, I have been jig fishing, mostly in the trophy area. Wednesday evening I started up close to the dam, looking up in some slack water pockets for staging brown. I did find a few medium-sized browns in what I would call outlet #4 -- where the water comes out of a pipe about 150 yards below outlet #3. I hooked one of these browns for a few seconds on a chartreuse mega worm under an indicator, but the hook pulled out. I tried a few dry flies in this area because I've had luck in the past picking up both browns and rainbows, but they weren't interested. I moved on down the bank throwing a 1/8th ounce sculpin jig, brown head and caught a few decent rainbows. Skipping the Trophy Run area, I boated on down below Lookout Island. That's where this video starts. I was hoping to luck into one of the browns that our guides had been telling us about. This was a big female. Its adipose fin had been clipped, identifying it as a triploid brown. Triploids are rendered sterile from birth. Eggs from brown trout are treated with hot water just after being fertilized, making them sterile. These browns are thought to grow faster because they supposedly don't go through the motions of spawning like other browns. The Missouri Department of Conservation first stocked triploids in Taneycomo in 2011. They only make up a small percentage of the total number of browns stocked. Jig fishing has been fair to good. We've been using smaller jigs when the water is off and heavier jigs during generation. Tony Weldele told me his clients were catching a lot of rainbows below Lookout in the mornings on the 3/32nd-ounce sculpin/ginger/brown head jig, four-pound line. (I'm guessing this is up closer to Lookout in deeper water and early before the sun gets up high overhead.) We've been pretty successful throwing smaller jigs with two-pound line down around the resort area, up closer to Fall Creek but still out of the trophy area. The area from Fall Creek up to the Narrows has also been profitable with sculpin/ginger, sculpin/peach and straight sculpin or olive in 1/32nd -and 1/16th-ounce jigs. Before the sun hits the water, work your jig close to the surface, especially if the trout are midging, and fish them deeper as the sun hits the water. During generation, we're using four-pound line and heavier jigs -- 3/32nd and 1/8th ounce in the same colors. Duane has been drifting with the Berkley's Pink Powerworm during generation and doing the best down lake around the Landing. Note how he threads the worm up the hook and line: This is a #8 short shanked hook we sell on our drift rigs. Salmon eggs are still doing very well when the water is off, fished from our dock and other locations on the lake. Also Powerbait paste in yellow and orange as well as PowerEggs when drifted with the current. View full article
  20. Well autumn is finally arriving here -- at least we hope we all are done with summer high temperatures. We've received good rains lately and everything is green again. The trees are starting to show a little color on the bluffs, and the fall flowers are in full blooms along the lake. Trout fishing on Taneycomo stayed pretty strong all summer. We usually see water conditions deteriorate as fall approaches -- the dissolved oxygen drops, and water temperature rises -- but we haven't seen hardly any of that yet. The lake temperature is holding at about 52 degrees, and the water is very clear. Generation has varied; weather and temperature seem to dictate how much and how long dam operators run water. Since its grown cooler, they've been running water for two to three hours late in the afternoon and only running one to two units. Our brown trout move up in the lake in fall months to spawn. They actually don't spawn successfully, but do go through the motions. We are seeing a good number of browns already up below the dam, some being caught up near the hatchery outlets. Guide Chuck Gries told me clients are hooking most browns when wading and fly fishing below the dam. Most of these browns are on the small side, but several in the 22 - to 26-inch range have been brought in. Guide Tony Weldele has been seeing some very large browns moving up, staging in the Narrows area. These browns are almost always on the move and won't stay in one area for very long. Browns and rainbows are being caught on scuds, sow bugs, egg flies and sculpin streamers. I know other flies are good, too, including cracklebacks, WD40's, san juan worms, mega worms, soft hackles and woolybuggers. Night fishing has been very good throwing big streamers, as well as the miracle fly and scuds under a glowing indicator. Thursday morning I fished the Narrows area with no generation. Since it was almost 9 a.m., the sun was already up over most of the area. Struggling for most of the morning, I tried larger scuds (12's and 14's) in gray and brown with no takers. I stripped a sculpin woolybugger for a while with not even one chaser. It wasn't until I changed to 7x tippet and a #18 gray scud that I started picking up trout. I also tried and caught a few on a #18 primrose -n- pearl zebra midge under a float 30 inches deep. It was sunny with hardly any wind, so conditions were tough. When fishing the bigger flies, the fish would come and look, then turn away. But later when I reduced the size of everything, I was able to target feeding rainbows, especially close to the bank and on the shallow flats. This is why they are digging around in the gravel and along the banks: Scud flies come in lots of sizes, shapes and colors. We tie most of them using natural fur of various kinds -- squirrel, rabbit, mink, muskrat, dog and cat . . . even kangaroo! Each one has a different texture and ties differently on a hook. They also act differently in water. The shape depends on the style of hook used, whether long, short, curved or straight. And, of course, the size depends on the size of hook. We add weight using very thin lead wire wrapped around the hook or thin brass or copper wire wrapped around the fur to give the fly a segmented look. Once the fur is applied and the fly is done, a small wire brush is used to comb the fibers down, creating the legs under the bug. Excess fibers are trimmed on top -- although my example scuds aren't combed and trimmed very well. I observed scuds in tan, gray, olive and brown colors while raising them in an aquarium several years ago. In the evenings when water has been running, I have been jig fishing, mostly in the trophy area. Wednesday evening I started up close to the dam, looking up in some slack water pockets for staging brown. I did find a few medium-sized browns in what I would call outlet #4 -- where the water comes out of a pipe about 150 yards below outlet #3. I hooked one of these browns for a few seconds on a chartreuse mega worm under an indicator, but the hook pulled out. I tried a few dry flies in this area because I've had luck in the past picking up both browns and rainbows, but they weren't interested. I moved on down the bank throwing a 1/8th ounce sculpin jig, brown head and caught a few decent rainbows. Skipping the Trophy Run area, I boated on down below Lookout Island. That's where this video starts. I was hoping to luck into one of the browns that our guides had been telling us about. This was a big female. Its adipose fin had been clipped, identifying it as a triploid brown. Triploids are rendered sterile from birth. Eggs from brown trout are treated with hot water just after being fertilized, making them sterile. These browns are thought to grow faster because they supposedly don't go through the motions of spawning like other browns. The Missouri Department of Conservation first stocked triploids in Taneycomo in 2011. They only make up a small percentage of the total number of browns stocked. Jig fishing has been fair to good. We've been using smaller jigs when the water is off and heavier jigs during generation. Tony Weldele told me his clients were catching a lot of rainbows below Lookout in the mornings on the 3/32nd-ounce sculpin/ginger/brown head jig, four-pound line. (I'm guessing this is up closer to Lookout in deeper water and early before the sun gets up high overhead.) We've been pretty successful throwing smaller jigs with two-pound line down around the resort area, up closer to Fall Creek but still out of the trophy area. The area from Fall Creek up to the Narrows has also been profitable with sculpin/ginger, sculpin/peach and straight sculpin or olive in 1/32nd -and 1/16th-ounce jigs. Before the sun hits the water, work your jig close to the surface, especially if the trout are midging, and fish them deeper as the sun hits the water. During generation, we're using four-pound line and heavier jigs -- 3/32nd and 1/8th ounce in the same colors. Duane has been drifting with the Berkley's Pink Powerworm during generation and doing the best down lake around the Landing. Note how he threads the worm up the hook and line: This is a #8 short shanked hook we sell on our drift rigs. Salmon eggs are still doing very well when the water is off, fished from our dock and other locations on the lake. Also Powerbait paste in yellow and orange as well as PowerEggs when drifted with the current.
  21. They've always been around. Actually don't see as many as I used to years ago. Duane said he saw fish busting on minnows at Fall Creek the other morning... that's unusual!!
  22. Phil Lilley

    Good Start to the Weekend!

    It's amazing those nice ones get by all the bait in that area to grow that big and beautiful! Nice!
  23. Some old scud videos.
  24. Phil Lilley

    Bugs at the Narrows

    I love to see this!!! It seems like they come and go with no rhyme of reason. But bugs are thick in our lake right now!! I found this this thick all the way down to Short Creek.
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