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Phil Lilley

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Everything posted by Phil Lilley

  1. Anyone fishing below dam now?

    They are starting to generate more, probably to drop Beaver. But it's not all the time. Can't help you on the fishing... sorry.
  2. Buck creek area

    Thanks for the report. I love that area... always caught a lot of smallies there.
  3. Well, we've been through another rain event which, at least for us here on Taneycomo, has ran its course. Table Rock is back to power pool, and the powers who have run water through Table Rock Dam have cut back flows to a minimum (as of today). Beaver Lake, on the other hand, remains very high and show no sign of being dropped any time soon. One good rain puts more water on us, but the 7-day forecast calls for less than 1.5 inches over the area. Our lake water looks to be in great condition. Water temperature is running about 46 degrees coming out of Table Rock Lake and I would expect our water to warm up with days in the 60's and 70's in our near future. Because fishing has been so tough, really for most of the spring so far, there should be a build up of rainbows in the lake, especially from Branson to the dam. There simply hasn't been the volume of trout cleaned, at least at our cleaning stations lately. Before the last rains, our guides and other anglers were catching a lot of rainbows on the pink Berkley's Powerworm under a float. I saw one of them this morning fishing it in front of our dock and catching fish so I guess they're picking up where they left off. The BPW should work - I'd use 2-pound line though - to catch more numbers of trout. Night crawlers are still one of the hottest baits right now. With only 35 megawatts of power running (3,000 cfs), I'd only use a small split shot for weight, just enough to get it to the bottom. We sell drift rigs with 1/8th-ounce bell weights... unfortunately, those are too big for the current we're seeing right now. Just tie on a #8 hook and pinch a small shot 18 inches above the line. Two or 4-pound would work fine. Don't wad the worm up on the hook... pinch the worm in half and slide the hook through the worm at the center point, letting the worm hang off both sides of the hook. You don't have to hide the hook at all. Inject it with air if you want but when drifting it, you really don't have to. Jig fishing should be very good with the water as low as it is. Either throw a jig straight of use it under a float. The sculpin/ginger or sculpin/peach has been the best color lately with white and white/gray a close second. I've been throwing black and black/olive a lot with little success, which is surprising. That was the best color this time last year. Fly fishing should be heating up too with the lower water. We have seen big midge hatches the last few days and the barn swallows are back in big numbers. You can tell when there's a hatch because the swallows are swarming all over the surface of the lake picking off bugs as they hatch off the water. So midges - soft hackles and zebra midges should be good as well as cracklebacks. I'm being pretty general in my reporting because we haven't been out enough to see how the trout are reacting to this new generation pattern. But we are looking forward to doing some more scouting very soon! View full article
  4. April 17 Fishing Report, Taneycomo

    Caddis, no. We don't have many caddis here. Not sure why. The guides caught trout this morning throwing silver spoons down around the Landing. Nice ones.
  5. With his father's help, Zaniel Cole, 8, has done the unthinkable in Oklahoma. Not only did Zaniel snag a 100-pound paddlefish, but he also managed to snag a rare shovelnose sturgeon the very same day! Paddlefish and shovelnose sturgeon are distant cousins in the order Acipenseriformes and date to the time of the dinosaurs, which is why they are referred to as "prehistoric fishes." Although they are the most abundant sturgeon in North America, shovelnose sturgeon numbers have declined over the past century and they are rare in Oklahoma. So, catching a shovelnose sturgeon the same day as a 100-pound paddlefish is a notable thrill. Shovelnose sturgeon are not federally protected in Oklahoma, but they are listed as a Species of Special Concern in Category II. This means there is insufficient information to adequately evaluate the population status or species trend in Oklahoma. Harvest of shovelnose sturgeon is legal with a limit of one per day. However, any shovelnose sturgeon caught in the state is required to be reported to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. Zaniel and his father, Adam, released the shovelnose sturgeon and reported their catch to the Wildlife Department. Their story was shared on the Wildlife Department's Facebook page and has quickly become very popular. Learn more about the shovelnose sturgeon in the upcoming May/June issue of Outdoor Oklahoma, the official Wildlife Department magazine. Anglers should take special precautions when handling paddlefish. It is best to avoid holding or grabbing the fish by its jaw or gills. Just remember to #HugAPaddlefish (Photos Courtesy of Adam Cole)
  6. Dock Replacement...

    Fast forward to 10:00 for real action.
  7. Well, we've been through another rain event which, at least for us here on Taneycomo, has ran its course. Table Rock is back to power pool, and the powers who have run water through Table Rock Dam have cut back flows to a minimum (as of today). Beaver Lake, on the other hand, remains very high and show no sign of being dropped any time soon. One good rain puts more water on us, but the 7-day forecast calls for less than 1.5 inches over the area. Our lake water looks to be in great condition. Water temperature is running about 46 degrees coming out of Table Rock Lake and I would expect our water to warm up with days in the 60's and 70's in our near future. Because fishing has been so tough, really for most of the spring so far, there should be a build up of rainbows in the lake, especially from Branson to the dam. There simply hasn't been the volume of trout cleaned, at least at our cleaning stations lately. Before the last rains, our guides and other anglers were catching a lot of rainbows on the pink Berkley's Powerworm under a float. I saw one of them this morning fishing it in front of our dock and catching fish so I guess they're picking up where they left off. The BPW should work - I'd use 2-pound line though - to catch more numbers of trout. Night crawlers are still one of the hottest baits right now. With only 35 megawatts of power running (3,000 cfs), I'd only use a small split shot for weight, just enough to get it to the bottom. We sell drift rigs with 1/8th-ounce bell weights... unfortunately, those are too big for the current we're seeing right now. Just tie on a #8 hook and pinch a small shot 18 inches above the line. Two or 4-pound would work fine. Don't wad the worm up on the hook... pinch the worm in half and slide the hook through the worm at the center point, letting the worm hang off both sides of the hook. You don't have to hide the hook at all. Inject it with air if you want but when drifting it, you really don't have to. Jig fishing should be very good with the water as low as it is. Either throw a jig straight of use it under a float. The sculpin/ginger or sculpin/peach has been the best color lately with white and white/gray a close second. I've been throwing black and black/olive a lot with little success, which is surprising. That was the best color this time last year. Fly fishing should be heating up too with the lower water. We have seen big midge hatches the last few days and the barn swallows are back in big numbers. You can tell when there's a hatch because the swallows are swarming all over the surface of the lake picking off bugs as they hatch off the water. So midges - soft hackles and zebra midges should be good as well as cracklebacks. I'm being pretty general in my reporting because we haven't been out enough to see how the trout are reacting to this new generation pattern. But we are looking forward to doing some more scouting very soon!
  8. Rain on the way

    Even more so west OK... they're really hurting for rain.
  9. Rain on the way

    This is the 7-day accumulative forecast. I'm hoping it's accurate!
  10. Dock Replacement...

    Oh the old dock is parked down at the grandparents house for now.
  11. Dock Replacement...

    @MickinMO the angled slips are part of the old, new section. The new, new stalls are double with a divider. Angled stalls take up a lot of room.
  12. Dock Replacement...

    @vonreed I just ordered some today
  13. Fishing Podcasts

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-outdoor-guys-radio-show/id523463773
  14. Whites?

    He said he heard whites are being caught as of yesterday at Roly Blunk Bend.
  15. Whites?

    I think some things you won't hear about until a few days after it happens... Beaver Creek, Swan Creek and Blunk are 3 places people are pretty tight-lipped about. But I do have a good source... I'll check with him.
  16. Quick Taney Update

    As you probably have heard, they've shut the flood gates and lowered generation on Taneycomo. Table Rock is at 915.72 feet and dropping very slowly at this point. Beaver is still high but it seems like the Corps is good with holding it, while generating a few hours each day to hold it steady at 1127.5 feet. They are running 2 units all day and night right now at Table Rock Dam. The flow is dramatically different now that it was a few days ago. It is much slower and you can see the bottom most places above Short Creek. It's much more conducive to fishing, or getting to the fish now. I got out for an hour yesterday and fished from below Fall Creek to Trout Hollow. I threw jigs at first, on the shallow side. I didn't connect when fishing along the bank but did when I turned around the started throwing out to deeper water. Caught them on an 1/8th ounce sculpin/ginger jig. At about the boat ramp, I started drifting a night crawler on the bottom, mid lake. I used only a #3 split shot 18 inches above a #8 hook, 4-pound line. I hook the worm in the collar and break off the back half, letting the worm hang off both ends of the hook. I don't try to hide the hook at all. Caught 3 nice rainbows, all about 12 inches and thick, very healthy. Night crawlers are definitely the hot bait right now. Minnows are ok and so are Gulp Eggs.
  17. That's what I was thinking.
  18. Flood Gates Closed (for now?)

    They are running at Bull Shoals... they're not holding it. It's a good thing too... people on BS are very tired of being underwater all summer.
  19. Flood Gates Closed (for now?)

    I'd boated to the dam and videoed up there... but didn't catch anything. The wind kicked my butt. Current is a lot slower, manageable. Looking forward to doing some serious looking around the next couple of days.
  20. Flood Gates Closed (for now?)

    That's what they've done historically. I'm sure there's an explaination but I don't have it. I'm sure it has something to do with the capacity of each lake in the system. This is the 7-day total map. it could move west a little... hopefully not. I check it every couple of days.
  21. Kendall Sapp with her first ever turkey she harvested during youth spring turkey season. Young turkey hunters harvested 1,723 turkeys during the 2018 spring youth season, April 7-8. Top harvest counties were Franklin, Miller, and Maries. JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – According to preliminary data from Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), young turkey hunters harvested 1,723 turkeys during the 2018 spring youth season, April 7-8. Top harvest counties were Franklin with 51 turkeys harvested, Miller with 43, and Maries with 43. Young hunters checked a little over 4,000 turkeys during last year’s youth weekend. MDC’s Turkey Biologist, Jason Isabelle, says the drop in harvest can be attributed mostly to unseasonably cold temperatures this weekend and for much of spring thus far. “Weather was the biggest contributing factor to this year’s low youth turkey season harvest,” Isabelle said. “Temperatures that were well-below average probably made it difficult for young hunters to spend as much time hunting this past weekend as they would have with more seasonal temperatures.” Isabelle also notes that in addition to cold temperatures this weekend, spring has been slow to get here this year causing turkeys to be a little behind schedule as far as the winter flock break-up. “When turkeys are still flocked up as they are in much of the state right now, it can make for some very challenging hunting,” he said. “With warmer temperatures in the forecast, hunting conditions should be much more favorable for the upcoming regular spring turkey season.” For county-specific information on turkey harvest, visit MDC online at extra.mdc.mo.gov/widgets/harvest_table/. For more information on the upcoming regular spring turkey hunting season, April 16-May 6, get a copy of MDC’s 2018 Spring Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information booklet, available where permits are sold, or online at huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/sites/default/files/downloads/2018springturkey.pdf. Hunters who harvest their first turkey can have the accomplishment recognized through a special certificate from MDC, complete with a photo. Learn more at huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/hunting-trapping/trophies-certificates/certificates.
  22. Just like with all fishing tournaments, some catch them and some don't. Duane and Jack caught them... most of us didn't. I'm not going to give out numbers but let's just day Duane didn't beat last year's total but he was just under it. I'll find what he got and post it later. He took first in the professional division.... again.... for the third time in a row. Most of his fish, our the others I know where they fished, came out of slack water, different spots. I don't know what colors he threw but I caught my fish on sculpin/ginger 1/8th and 3/32nd ounce jigs. White didn't do it today. Jack Harris took first place in the intermediate division. This 19.5 inch brown helped push his numbers well over the other participants. He caught it on a crank bait drifting it on the bottom below Fall Creek. Look at the red spots!! Brandon Kossler took first place in the novice division.
  23. Fishing Podcasts

    If you find any, let us know!
  24. JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports 33 news cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have been found following the testing of 24,486 free-ranging Missouri deer through its 2017-2018 sampling and testing efforts. The new cases were from the following counties: Adair (3), Cedar (1), Franklin (4), Jefferson (1), Linn (7), Macon (3), Perry (1), Polk (3), St. Clair (4), and Ste. Genevieve (6). Of the 33 new cases, 16 were from hunter-harvested deer, one was from a road-killed deer, and 16 were from MDC’s post-season targeted culling efforts in the immediate areas around where previous cases have been found. This year’s findings bring the total number of free-ranging deer in Missouri confirmed to have CWD to 75. For more information, visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “CWD in Missouri.” “For a third year in a row, we found no CWD-positive deer in central Missouri, where a single case was confirmed in early 2015,” said MDC Wildlife Disease Coordinator Jasmine Batten. “Additionally, we found no cases of CWD on the Missouri-Arkansas border, despite the high level of CWD in northwest Arkansas.” Batten added that where CWD has been found in Missouri, the numbers of positives remain relatively low. “It is encouraging that cases of CWD are still pretty low overall, and MDC remains committed to monitoring the disease and taking actions to limit its spread,” she said. “We encourage hunters and landowners to continue participating in our CWD monitoring and management efforts.” Batten added that these efforts are vital in limiting the spread of the disease. “If we do nothing, areas affected by CWD will increase in size and many more deer will become infected by the disease,” she explained. “Over time, this would lead to significant long-term population declines.” MDC will continue CWD sampling this fall and winter MDC will again require mandatory sampling of deer harvested during the opening weekend of the fall firearms deer season, Nov. 10 and 11, in and around counties where the disease has been recently found. MDC will again also offer voluntary CWD sampling during the entire fall and winter hunting season of deer harvested in and around counties where the disease has been recently found. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend hunters in areas known to have CWD test their deer before consuming the meat. More information on specific counties, sampling locations, and requirements will be published in MDC’s “2018 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information” booklet, and online at mdc.mo.gov/cwd, starting in July. More on targeted culling After the close of deer season, MDC staff work with landowners on a voluntary basis to cull additional deer within an area of 1 to 5 miles of where recent cases of CWD have been found. Collecting additional samples helps MDC scientists better understand how many deer in the area may be infected and where they are in the area. Targeted culling also helps limit the spread of CWD by removing potentially infected deer from an area. “Targeted culling has proven to be very useful in finding cases of CWD and in reducing the spread of the disease by removing additional CWD-infected animals,” explained Batten. “We found about half of the new CWD cases this year through targeted culling. Without targeted culling, those 16 infected deer would have continued to spread the disease.” She added that targeted culling is the only tested method of slowing the growth of CWD in a local deer population. “The state of Illinois has been successful in stabilizing levels of CWD through the use of a sustained targeted culling program over many years,” Batten said. “In contrast, states such as Wisconsin that have not used targeted culling, or that have only implemented targeted culling for a short period of time, have seen levels of CWD climb steadily.” Of the more than 101,000 deer MDC has tested for CWD since 2001, about 4,500 have been harvested through targeted culling, including 1,485 from the past season. “This accounts for about 4% of all CWD samples collected so far, but has resulted in finding about 49% of CWD cases in Missouri,” Batten explained. Learn more about targeted culling through this video: youtube.com/watch?v=7VitIahG5Do For more information on CWD, visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd.
  25. 3rd Annual CAM Measure Tournament

    Duane with his first place plaque. David Doty, 2nd place Pro Division. Seth Turner, 3rd place Pro Division. Jack Harris, 1st place Intermediate Division. Blake Harris, 2nd place Intermediate Division. Dylan Harris, 3rd place Intermediate Division. Brandon, first place in the Novice Division. Chuck Puckett, 2nd place Novice Division. Teri Doty, 3rd place Novice Division Tom Johnson, 4th place Novice Division. Honorable Mention - DJ Beal with the Duck Award.
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