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Phil Lilley

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  1. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from scifi for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, July 30   
    Lake Taneycomo is "back to normal" again after Powersite Dam  repairs were completed  Monday from damage in a high water event back in the spring.  An airline was severed by floating debris that connected to one of the gates across the top of the dam. That caused the gate to remain in the down position, putting Taneycomo's lake level  about four feet lower than normal.  Many areas on the lake were impacted, including Rockaway Beach, and the very upper end of the lake.  But now the lake is back to normal with docks that were grounded on mud now floating and stumps and rocks now covered again.
    Today, our generation pattern is the same it has been these past few weeks:  A half unit running during the night and through the morning with up to three units coming online after noon and staying on into the evening.  We had anticipated some periods of no generation after the lower dam was fixed -- and we still might see that in the near future -- but not yet.
    Trout fishing pretty much remains the same as it has been, minus the stress of navigating a boat in certain areas of the lake.  If you're in a boat, with the present water running in the mornings, you can boat all the way up to Fall Creek, running mid-lake, with no problems.  You can continue all the way to Lookout Island  the same way as long as you stay on plain.  But going up past Lookout, you'll need to stay in the channel and avoid some boulders up above the Missouri Department of Conservation boat ramp to the cable below the dam.  If you don't know this area, I would suggest not venturing past Lookout Island.
    Our water temperature is holding at about 51 degrees and clarity is very good.  There has been some discussion on social media about low dissolved oxygen affecting fishing, but that is not the case at all.  Our trout are very active and fight extremely hard when hooked.  Here is a chart from the U.S Army Corps of Engineer's site showing real time D.O. levels and water temperature.

    Fishing off our dock continues to be slow, but if you get out in a boat in front of the dock and up and down our area of the lake, fishing is pretty good.  I'm not sure why that is, but it could change at any time.  There's one thing we've learned about trout and fishing Lake Taneycomo is that good fishing areas change and move on a daily basis because schools of rainbows move up and down the lake all the time.  Freshly stocked rainbows will generally stay together in a big school and eventually break off into smaller schools as time goes on.  Trout are stocked on a weekly basis either by truck off a boat ramp or by pontoon boat in various areas of the lake.  I believe most of the rainbows stocked are released in the Branson area while some are stocked down at Rockaway Beach and others at Ozark Beach when water temperatures allow it.
    When fishing from the bank or dock, morning is the only good time due to generation in the afternoons.  After the water starts running, it's almost impossible to catch fish in a stationary position.  The best fishing starts at daybreak.

    A boat ride last week proved there are good numbers of rainbows in all these areas as I saw dozens of trout rising to the surface feeding.  And throwing a 1/32nd-ounce small black jig around these rising trout produced strikes and hookups -- yes, even down at Ozark Beach at the very lower end of Lake Taneycomo.  The water temperature was quite cold even down there.
    If you're new at catching trout on Taneycomo, one of several easy ways to fish and catch rainbows, from the bank or from a boat, is to fish with a float and something below it.  Line is very important - add a two-pound piece of "tippet" to the line on your reel.  Our trout will see heavy line and will not bite.  Use a small jig head and a Berkley's pink powerworm under the float.  That's what most of our guides use to catch trout for their clients.  Early, when the sun is not up over the water, they're fishing it four- to five-feet deep.  Then when it gets lighter outside, they'll go deeper -- up to nine-feet deep.
    Night crawlers are still the hot bait for either still fishing or drifting.  Two-pound line is again essential for anything fished while the water is slow or off.  When drifting, four-pound is okay to use.  Use only a half worm at a time and hook it once, letting it hang off the hook naturally.  Don't ball it up on the hook -- make it look like a worm.  Inject air into the worm using a fill needle.  That will float it off the bottom making it more visible to the trout.
    We continue to catch a lot of trout on our marabou jigs, throwing them straight or using them under a float.  Black is still the best color but white, sculpin, brown, sculpin/peach are also been hot.  When the water is slow, we're throwing 1/32nd- and 1/16th-ounce using two-pound line.  Work the jig close to the surface and half way down early when you're in the shade -- and on the bottom when the sun is over the surface.  Do the same when fishing under a float. 
    The Turner Micro Jig is working as well, under a float using two-pound line.  Good colors have been olive and brown in the half-micro.
    In the trophy area, jigs are working very well.  In the mornings, drift a scud under a float and set the float as least as deep as the water is -- even deeper.  The scud needs to be fished on the bottom since that is  where the scuds live.  You can use this technique either with a fly rod or spin rod.
    If we get any time in the near future when the water is not running, I would try fishing a zebra midge under a float in and below the trophy area.  I can't say for sure what color and size, but I would try several different flies to see what they like.  Red, black, green and brown with copper or black bead heads are staple flies to use on Taneycomo.  I'd stay with small sizes -- #16 and #18 should work.  And you may have to go to 7x to get bit . . .  I don't like using 7x but if the fish are that picky, then you must try it.  I don't like using 7x because it takes way too long to land a fish.  I don't like to tire them out like that.
  2. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo fishing report, July 9   
    Generation on Lake Taneycomo has remained fairly consistent.  Dam operators are running four full units every afternoon and into the evening, probably because of the heat (creating power demands.)  In the mornings, the water is either off or they're running 30 to 40 megawatts, or less than a half unit.  This is great water for wading below the dam.  Beaver Lake's level isn't moving, while Table Rock's level is inching down.  Bull Shoals Lake's level is not moving much either but is trending down a bit.
    Powersite Dam is still broken.  The baffled gates across the top of the spillway part of the dam are in the down position, causing Taneycomo's "normal" level to be about four feet lower.   This causes a lot of trouble for many dock owners as well as boaters.

    The docks at Rockaway Beach are beached -- literally.
    Up our way, boating past Trout Hollow Resort is very tricky.  Most anglers are dropping the trolling motor and running up to Short Creek where there's deep water on the channel side.  Going from there to almost Fall Creek Marina is still not easy.  There are several stumps and trees in the channel that come into play.  Boating past Fall Creek's bar is another trolling motor ride.
    No Generation --
    Guide Bill Babler reports catching good rainbows on a Turner half micro jig under a float.  He said olive is the color, with an olive head.  Use two-pound line and set the float according to depth of water you're fishing.  Fish it about a foot off the bottom.

    Guide Duane Doty, picture above, is putting his clients on fish using either a pink or orange PowerWorm on a jig head under a float.  He's using the same rig as Babler -- two-pound line and at the same varying depth.  
    With both guides the bite has been quick and slight.  You really have to watch the float and be quick on the set.
    Throwing small jigs straight-line is working pretty well, too, using two-pound line and 1/32- to 1/16th-ounce jigs worked in the deeper, channel water from the Landing up to Fall Creek.  If you can get above Fall Creek, that technique works up there, too.  Use darker colors over lighter colors -- sculpin, brown, sculpin/ginger, brown/burnt orange.
    Generation --
    When the water starts, drift a #12 or #14 scud using a drift rig on four-pound line, from the dam down to Short Creek.  Stay in the middle to the inside bend.  Your weight should be on the lighter side, and you should check your flies for moss every 100-200 yards.  I've been doing okay using different shades of gray, olive and brown scuds.
    White jigs from the cable down to the boat ramp are still catching trout, but that has tapered off quite a bit since  the spill gates were closed.  Use 3/32nd-ounce jigs even with four units on four-pound line.


    Stick baits are doing pretty well catching mainly brown trout from the dam down to Fall Creek working the channel side of the lake.  Any medium diving lure similar to a MegaBass 110+ is what we recommend.  You'll get a lot of strikes and follows but not a lot of landed fish.  But you have a better chance landing a big trout using this technique.
    Night crawlers are doing the best in the bait category.  Drifting them on the bottom from Fall Creek clear down through the Landing area has been good, yielding some really nice quality rainbows.


    **All photos taken on guide trips with Captain Duane Doty.   See his Facebook Page for information.
  3. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo fishing report, July 1   
    Generation has taken another turn this week, one that will make our fly fishing buddies happy.  There is no generation in the mornings right now, but then operators are cranking it in the afternoons.  But there is a catch . . .let me explain.
    In my fishing reports the last couple of weeks, I've mentioned problems at Powersite Dam, Taneycomo's lower dam.  There's a baffle gate system that runs on top of the spillway part of the dam, let down in case of flooding.  One of the baffles is stuck in the down position, allowing the lake to drop an additional three feet when there's no generation.  And when one or two units are running, our lake level here on the upper lake is still pretty low and the current is fast.
    When our lake is drawn down like this, a vast area of gravel above Fall Creek is exposed to air -- hot air and sunlight -- which cooks the bugs (scuds, sow bugs), not to mention the sculpin that get marooned in small holes that dry up.  This morning, no water was run to help this situation, but I'm told tomorrow dam operators will "pulse" water throughout the morning to keep this area watered.  We will see.
    Boating this low water is tricky, especially above Trout Hollow.  Take it very slow and stay in the channel to Fall Creek.  Pick your way through the Fall Creek bar, then at the narrows, really take it slow.  Just consider that the water is two to three feet lower than normal and a lot of these areas are already pretty shallow.  But our water is clear, and you can see the bottom.
    A young man reported that he had caught a lot of trout just below Fall Creek on Power Bait . . . I just did not ask him what color.  Another guest here at the resort, a seasoned jig fisherman, said it's been tough for him and his dad yesterday and today.  He said he's been getting short strikes.  I sympathize with him.  I've had the same problem.  I told him that that's fishing and that these trout will go through spells when they're just not aggressive.
    Taking some friends on a boat ride this morning, I saw some of our guides catch fish down at Monkey Island on the pink worm under a float.  Then I saw something I reported back to those guides -- a bunch of trout midging on the surface just upstream of Main Street Dock, at the Landing.  These typically are a school of freshly stocked rainbows, easy to catch with something under a float (jig, pink worm), a spoon, spinner or a small jig.
    Another report I got this morning was from a fly fisherman, wading and fishing below the dam.  He caught a lot of nice trout on an olive wooly bugger up around outlet #1.
    One last thing -- I've been told that we may see heavy generation here on Lake Taneycomo starting next week.  At some point, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be cleared to start releasing some of the water from all three lakes in this system.  This may not be the big release but it could be the start.
  4. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo fishing report, July 1   
    Generation has taken another turn this week, one that will make our fly fishing buddies happy.  There is no generation in the mornings right now, but then operators are cranking it in the afternoons.  But there is a catch . . .let me explain.
    In my fishing reports the last couple of weeks, I've mentioned problems at Powersite Dam, Taneycomo's lower dam.  There's a baffle gate system that runs on top of the spillway part of the dam, let down in case of flooding.  One of the baffles is stuck in the down position, allowing the lake to drop an additional three feet when there's no generation.  And when one or two units are running, our lake level here on the upper lake is still pretty low and the current is fast.
    When our lake is drawn down like this, a vast area of gravel above Fall Creek is exposed to air -- hot air and sunlight -- which cooks the bugs (scuds, sow bugs), not to mention the sculpin that get marooned in small holes that dry up.  This morning, no water was run to help this situation, but I'm told tomorrow dam operators will "pulse" water throughout the morning to keep this area watered.  We will see.
    Boating this low water is tricky, especially above Trout Hollow.  Take it very slow and stay in the channel to Fall Creek.  Pick your way through the Fall Creek bar, then at the narrows, really take it slow.  Just consider that the water is two to three feet lower than normal and a lot of these areas are already pretty shallow.  But our water is clear, and you can see the bottom.
    A young man reported that he had caught a lot of trout just below Fall Creek on Power Bait . . . I just did not ask him what color.  Another guest here at the resort, a seasoned jig fisherman, said it's been tough for him and his dad yesterday and today.  He said he's been getting short strikes.  I sympathize with him.  I've had the same problem.  I told him that that's fishing and that these trout will go through spells when they're just not aggressive.
    Taking some friends on a boat ride this morning, I saw some of our guides catch fish down at Monkey Island on the pink worm under a float.  Then I saw something I reported back to those guides -- a bunch of trout midging on the surface just upstream of Main Street Dock, at the Landing.  These typically are a school of freshly stocked rainbows, easy to catch with something under a float (jig, pink worm), a spoon, spinner or a small jig.
    Another report I got this morning was from a fly fisherman, wading and fishing below the dam.  He caught a lot of nice trout on an olive wooly bugger up around outlet #1.
    One last thing -- I've been told that we may see heavy generation here on Lake Taneycomo starting next week.  At some point, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be cleared to start releasing some of the water from all three lakes in this system.  This may not be the big release but it could be the start.
  5. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from nomolites for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, June 28   
    I know it's only been two days since my last report, but conditions have change so much that hardly none of the June 26 report holds true for fishing Lake Taneycomo.  Here's why.
    The short answer is that the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were closed yesterday morning.
    In just a matter of a few days, Beaver Lake was dropped from a high of 1,131.5 feet above sea level to its present level of 1,129.1 feet I think the release was about 25,000 cubic feet per second of water at the heaviest flow.  This was in response to a four-inch rain over the weekend that sent the upper White River and other feeder streams out of their banks.  Just north of the basin, flash floods sadly inundated the towns of Anderson and Cassville, Missouri, as well as other communities in the area.
    All of this runoff water eventually feeds Table Rock and that sent its level from 917 to 921 feet -- its present level.  When Table Rock hit 920 feet, 10 spill gates were opened to allow a little more than 20,000 c.f.s. of water to pass through to Lake Taneycomo.  Only after a few days, the inflow of water into both lakes became manageable through only turbine releases, so spill gates on both dams were closed (Thursday morning.)

    Presently, Table Rock is releasing 6,000 c.f.s. (two units) of water in the mornings and 10,000 c.f.s. (three units) of water in the afternoons.  Water temperature is about 47 degrees and clear.  And with little to no rain in the seven-day forecast, I believe this is the most water we'll see for a while. We may see even slower generation in the near future.
    One other thing about lake levels.  Note that Bull Shoals is now at 687.9 feet and rising.  Beaver and Bull Shoals are being held at high levels because of the flooding on the Arkansas and Mississippi Rivers.  Once these rivers can take water releases from the White River basin, both our tail water, Beaver's tail water and the White River tail water will see heavy flows, probably through the month of August.
    When the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were open, we saw an influx of warm water that affected our scud population (freshwater shrimp.)  They had babies basically . . . lots of babies.  It's amazing how fast they multiply given the right environment.  We also saw a pretty good flow of small threadfin shad and other small forage fish.  Yes, the "white bite" was on!  And so was the scud bite.  And boy was it good!!  And it still is.
    We are seeing some of the most beefed up rainbows in all my years of fishing this lake.  We are catching 17- to 19-inch rainbows that weigh three to four pounds, in some cases, and it's not all just big bellies either.  These fish are brutes -- big shoulders -- just big.  And fight . . . I've always said the Alaskan rainbows we catch fight harder than any trout I know, but these are giving them a run for their money.  It's exciting.
    Fishing from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run, stay in the middle and drift, using a drift rig, 1/8th-ounce bell weight, four-pound line and either a single or double fly rig -- #12 or #14 scud in dark gray, olive or brown.  You can run it with an egg, shad fly or San Juan Worm as the second fly also.  Some are using a white or cream Mega Worm and catching fish.
    You can drift these flies all the way down to Trout Hollow but stay either in the middle of the lake or on the inside bend -- stay off the bluff side.
    Jigs - white, of course, have been working, but as the "white bite" lessens, switch to a sculpin, olive, sculpin/ginger or peach, brown/orange or black jig.  Use four-pound line when throwing 1/8th- or 3/32nd- ounce jigs and two-pound line when throwing smaller jigs.  Try a smaller jig under a float. 
    Drifting night crawlers or orange PowerEggs from Fall Creek down to Short Creek has been good.  I've been fishing the inside bank from Cooper Creek down to Monkey Island throwing a variety of jigs and catching some real nice rainbows.
  6. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, June 28   
    I know it's only been two days since my last report, but conditions have change so much that hardly none of the June 26 report holds true for fishing Lake Taneycomo.  Here's why.
    The short answer is that the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were closed yesterday morning.
    In just a matter of a few days, Beaver Lake was dropped from a high of 1,131.5 feet above sea level to its present level of 1,129.1 feet I think the release was about 25,000 cubic feet per second of water at the heaviest flow.  This was in response to a four-inch rain over the weekend that sent the upper White River and other feeder streams out of their banks.  Just north of the basin, flash floods sadly inundated the towns of Anderson and Cassville, Missouri, as well as other communities in the area.
    All of this runoff water eventually feeds Table Rock and that sent its level from 917 to 921 feet -- its present level.  When Table Rock hit 920 feet, 10 spill gates were opened to allow a little more than 20,000 c.f.s. of water to pass through to Lake Taneycomo.  Only after a few days, the inflow of water into both lakes became manageable through only turbine releases, so spill gates on both dams were closed (Thursday morning.)

    Presently, Table Rock is releasing 6,000 c.f.s. (two units) of water in the mornings and 10,000 c.f.s. (three units) of water in the afternoons.  Water temperature is about 47 degrees and clear.  And with little to no rain in the seven-day forecast, I believe this is the most water we'll see for a while. We may see even slower generation in the near future.
    One other thing about lake levels.  Note that Bull Shoals is now at 687.9 feet and rising.  Beaver and Bull Shoals are being held at high levels because of the flooding on the Arkansas and Mississippi Rivers.  Once these rivers can take water releases from the White River basin, both our tail water, Beaver's tail water and the White River tail water will see heavy flows, probably through the month of August.
    When the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were open, we saw an influx of warm water that affected our scud population (freshwater shrimp.)  They had babies basically . . . lots of babies.  It's amazing how fast they multiply given the right environment.  We also saw a pretty good flow of small threadfin shad and other small forage fish.  Yes, the "white bite" was on!  And so was the scud bite.  And boy was it good!!  And it still is.
    We are seeing some of the most beefed up rainbows in all my years of fishing this lake.  We are catching 17- to 19-inch rainbows that weigh three to four pounds, in some cases, and it's not all just big bellies either.  These fish are brutes -- big shoulders -- just big.  And fight . . . I've always said the Alaskan rainbows we catch fight harder than any trout I know, but these are giving them a run for their money.  It's exciting.
    Fishing from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run, stay in the middle and drift, using a drift rig, 1/8th-ounce bell weight, four-pound line and either a single or double fly rig -- #12 or #14 scud in dark gray, olive or brown.  You can run it with an egg, shad fly or San Juan Worm as the second fly also.  Some are using a white or cream Mega Worm and catching fish.
    You can drift these flies all the way down to Trout Hollow but stay either in the middle of the lake or on the inside bend -- stay off the bluff side.
    Jigs - white, of course, have been working, but as the "white bite" lessens, switch to a sculpin, olive, sculpin/ginger or peach, brown/orange or black jig.  Use four-pound line when throwing 1/8th- or 3/32nd- ounce jigs and two-pound line when throwing smaller jigs.  Try a smaller jig under a float. 
    Drifting night crawlers or orange PowerEggs from Fall Creek down to Short Creek has been good.  I've been fishing the inside bank from Cooper Creek down to Monkey Island throwing a variety of jigs and catching some real nice rainbows.
  7. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, June 28   
    I know it's only been two days since my last report, but conditions have change so much that hardly none of the June 26 report holds true for fishing Lake Taneycomo.  Here's why.
    The short answer is that the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were closed yesterday morning.
    In just a matter of a few days, Beaver Lake was dropped from a high of 1,131.5 feet above sea level to its present level of 1,129.1 feet I think the release was about 25,000 cubic feet per second of water at the heaviest flow.  This was in response to a four-inch rain over the weekend that sent the upper White River and other feeder streams out of their banks.  Just north of the basin, flash floods sadly inundated the towns of Anderson and Cassville, Missouri, as well as other communities in the area.
    All of this runoff water eventually feeds Table Rock and that sent its level from 917 to 921 feet -- its present level.  When Table Rock hit 920 feet, 10 spill gates were opened to allow a little more than 20,000 c.f.s. of water to pass through to Lake Taneycomo.  Only after a few days, the inflow of water into both lakes became manageable through only turbine releases, so spill gates on both dams were closed (Thursday morning.)

    Presently, Table Rock is releasing 6,000 c.f.s. (two units) of water in the mornings and 10,000 c.f.s. (three units) of water in the afternoons.  Water temperature is about 47 degrees and clear.  And with little to no rain in the seven-day forecast, I believe this is the most water we'll see for a while. We may see even slower generation in the near future.
    One other thing about lake levels.  Note that Bull Shoals is now at 687.9 feet and rising.  Beaver and Bull Shoals are being held at high levels because of the flooding on the Arkansas and Mississippi Rivers.  Once these rivers can take water releases from the White River basin, both our tail water, Beaver's tail water and the White River tail water will see heavy flows, probably through the month of August.
    When the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were open, we saw an influx of warm water that affected our scud population (freshwater shrimp.)  They had babies basically . . . lots of babies.  It's amazing how fast they multiply given the right environment.  We also saw a pretty good flow of small threadfin shad and other small forage fish.  Yes, the "white bite" was on!  And so was the scud bite.  And boy was it good!!  And it still is.
    We are seeing some of the most beefed up rainbows in all my years of fishing this lake.  We are catching 17- to 19-inch rainbows that weigh three to four pounds, in some cases, and it's not all just big bellies either.  These fish are brutes -- big shoulders -- just big.  And fight . . . I've always said the Alaskan rainbows we catch fight harder than any trout I know, but these are giving them a run for their money.  It's exciting.
    Fishing from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run, stay in the middle and drift, using a drift rig, 1/8th-ounce bell weight, four-pound line and either a single or double fly rig -- #12 or #14 scud in dark gray, olive or brown.  You can run it with an egg, shad fly or San Juan Worm as the second fly also.  Some are using a white or cream Mega Worm and catching fish.
    You can drift these flies all the way down to Trout Hollow but stay either in the middle of the lake or on the inside bend -- stay off the bluff side.
    Jigs - white, of course, have been working, but as the "white bite" lessens, switch to a sculpin, olive, sculpin/ginger or peach, brown/orange or black jig.  Use four-pound line when throwing 1/8th- or 3/32nd- ounce jigs and two-pound line when throwing smaller jigs.  Try a smaller jig under a float. 
    Drifting night crawlers or orange PowerEggs from Fall Creek down to Short Creek has been good.  I've been fishing the inside bank from Cooper Creek down to Monkey Island throwing a variety of jigs and catching some real nice rainbows.
  8. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from trythisonemv for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, June 28   
    I know it's only been two days since my last report, but conditions have change so much that hardly none of the June 26 report holds true for fishing Lake Taneycomo.  Here's why.
    The short answer is that the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were closed yesterday morning.
    In just a matter of a few days, Beaver Lake was dropped from a high of 1,131.5 feet above sea level to its present level of 1,129.1 feet I think the release was about 25,000 cubic feet per second of water at the heaviest flow.  This was in response to a four-inch rain over the weekend that sent the upper White River and other feeder streams out of their banks.  Just north of the basin, flash floods sadly inundated the towns of Anderson and Cassville, Missouri, as well as other communities in the area.
    All of this runoff water eventually feeds Table Rock and that sent its level from 917 to 921 feet -- its present level.  When Table Rock hit 920 feet, 10 spill gates were opened to allow a little more than 20,000 c.f.s. of water to pass through to Lake Taneycomo.  Only after a few days, the inflow of water into both lakes became manageable through only turbine releases, so spill gates on both dams were closed (Thursday morning.)

    Presently, Table Rock is releasing 6,000 c.f.s. (two units) of water in the mornings and 10,000 c.f.s. (three units) of water in the afternoons.  Water temperature is about 47 degrees and clear.  And with little to no rain in the seven-day forecast, I believe this is the most water we'll see for a while. We may see even slower generation in the near future.
    One other thing about lake levels.  Note that Bull Shoals is now at 687.9 feet and rising.  Beaver and Bull Shoals are being held at high levels because of the flooding on the Arkansas and Mississippi Rivers.  Once these rivers can take water releases from the White River basin, both our tail water, Beaver's tail water and the White River tail water will see heavy flows, probably through the month of August.
    When the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were open, we saw an influx of warm water that affected our scud population (freshwater shrimp.)  They had babies basically . . . lots of babies.  It's amazing how fast they multiply given the right environment.  We also saw a pretty good flow of small threadfin shad and other small forage fish.  Yes, the "white bite" was on!  And so was the scud bite.  And boy was it good!!  And it still is.
    We are seeing some of the most beefed up rainbows in all my years of fishing this lake.  We are catching 17- to 19-inch rainbows that weigh three to four pounds, in some cases, and it's not all just big bellies either.  These fish are brutes -- big shoulders -- just big.  And fight . . . I've always said the Alaskan rainbows we catch fight harder than any trout I know, but these are giving them a run for their money.  It's exciting.
    Fishing from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run, stay in the middle and drift, using a drift rig, 1/8th-ounce bell weight, four-pound line and either a single or double fly rig -- #12 or #14 scud in dark gray, olive or brown.  You can run it with an egg, shad fly or San Juan Worm as the second fly also.  Some are using a white or cream Mega Worm and catching fish.
    You can drift these flies all the way down to Trout Hollow but stay either in the middle of the lake or on the inside bend -- stay off the bluff side.
    Jigs - white, of course, have been working, but as the "white bite" lessens, switch to a sculpin, olive, sculpin/ginger or peach, brown/orange or black jig.  Use four-pound line when throwing 1/8th- or 3/32nd- ounce jigs and two-pound line when throwing smaller jigs.  Try a smaller jig under a float. 
    Drifting night crawlers or orange PowerEggs from Fall Creek down to Short Creek has been good.  I've been fishing the inside bank from Cooper Creek down to Monkey Island throwing a variety of jigs and catching some real nice rainbows.
  9. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tho1mas for a article, Lilley's Lake Taneycomo Fishing Report, June 28   
    I know it's only been two days since my last report, but conditions have change so much that hardly none of the June 26 report holds true for fishing Lake Taneycomo.  Here's why.
    The short answer is that the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were closed yesterday morning.
    In just a matter of a few days, Beaver Lake was dropped from a high of 1,131.5 feet above sea level to its present level of 1,129.1 feet I think the release was about 25,000 cubic feet per second of water at the heaviest flow.  This was in response to a four-inch rain over the weekend that sent the upper White River and other feeder streams out of their banks.  Just north of the basin, flash floods sadly inundated the towns of Anderson and Cassville, Missouri, as well as other communities in the area.
    All of this runoff water eventually feeds Table Rock and that sent its level from 917 to 921 feet -- its present level.  When Table Rock hit 920 feet, 10 spill gates were opened to allow a little more than 20,000 c.f.s. of water to pass through to Lake Taneycomo.  Only after a few days, the inflow of water into both lakes became manageable through only turbine releases, so spill gates on both dams were closed (Thursday morning.)

    Presently, Table Rock is releasing 6,000 c.f.s. (two units) of water in the mornings and 10,000 c.f.s. (three units) of water in the afternoons.  Water temperature is about 47 degrees and clear.  And with little to no rain in the seven-day forecast, I believe this is the most water we'll see for a while. We may see even slower generation in the near future.
    One other thing about lake levels.  Note that Bull Shoals is now at 687.9 feet and rising.  Beaver and Bull Shoals are being held at high levels because of the flooding on the Arkansas and Mississippi Rivers.  Once these rivers can take water releases from the White River basin, both our tail water, Beaver's tail water and the White River tail water will see heavy flows, probably through the month of August.
    When the spill gates at Table Rock Dam were open, we saw an influx of warm water that affected our scud population (freshwater shrimp.)  They had babies basically . . . lots of babies.  It's amazing how fast they multiply given the right environment.  We also saw a pretty good flow of small threadfin shad and other small forage fish.  Yes, the "white bite" was on!  And so was the scud bite.  And boy was it good!!  And it still is.
    We are seeing some of the most beefed up rainbows in all my years of fishing this lake.  We are catching 17- to 19-inch rainbows that weigh three to four pounds, in some cases, and it's not all just big bellies either.  These fish are brutes -- big shoulders -- just big.  And fight . . . I've always said the Alaskan rainbows we catch fight harder than any trout I know, but these are giving them a run for their money.  It's exciting.
    Fishing from the cable below the dam down to Trophy Run, stay in the middle and drift, using a drift rig, 1/8th-ounce bell weight, four-pound line and either a single or double fly rig -- #12 or #14 scud in dark gray, olive or brown.  You can run it with an egg, shad fly or San Juan Worm as the second fly also.  Some are using a white or cream Mega Worm and catching fish.
    You can drift these flies all the way down to Trout Hollow but stay either in the middle of the lake or on the inside bend -- stay off the bluff side.
    Jigs - white, of course, have been working, but as the "white bite" lessens, switch to a sculpin, olive, sculpin/ginger or peach, brown/orange or black jig.  Use four-pound line when throwing 1/8th- or 3/32nd- ounce jigs and two-pound line when throwing smaller jigs.  Try a smaller jig under a float. 
    Drifting night crawlers or orange PowerEggs from Fall Creek down to Short Creek has been good.  I've been fishing the inside bank from Cooper Creek down to Monkey Island throwing a variety of jigs and catching some real nice rainbows.
  10. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MickinMO for a article, June 4 Fishing Report   
    Here on Lake Taneycomo, we're finally seeing some slower generation after months of high water.  But we're an oasis in the middle of flooding, all around us.  There are so many people affected by flooding,  our hearts go out to them.  We could easily be in the same position if weather patterns shift.
    We've had rain this past week but our watershed hasn't been blanketed with inches, only isolated storms delivering a half-inch at a time which soaks into the ground with little runoff.  So our lakes are not jumping up and generation has slowed.
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been running up to 3 units, starting early in the morning and shutting down after dark but this isn't the case every day.  Today, they are not running water until 2 p.m. which gives those who like to fish from the bank, or dock or wade a chance to enjoy some quiet water.  Hard to say what will happen in the coming days... we are forecasted to get quite a bit of rain this weekend but we will wait and see what falls and where.




    Duane had a guide trip this morning, early, and Steve did great throwing a stick bait.  He landed 4 rainbows over 20 inches, all in the lower trophy area.
    Speaking of scuds, a beaded scud under an indicator works well, using 6x or 2-pound line from Short Creek up.  So will a zebra midge.  I really don't have specific colors and sizes because I haven't been out to try it yet.  Same size tippet on the Zebras.
    Air injected night crawlers almost always catches fish anywhere on the upper lake but especially in the Short Creek area.

    The pink Powerworm caught this 15-pound brown in the Short Creek area last week.  We like to think a brown is smarter than that, growing from a 12-inch stocker to a 30-inch brute without being caught.  Taking a pink Powerworm shouldn't have been on this guy's menu.
    See all the trophies caught and released on our Trophy Page.
    Black/Olive marabou jigs have been doing pretty good so far this week, even out fishing the sculpin/peach jig.  White is still the color on the first half-mile of the lake, then switch to the darker colors.

  11. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Seth for a article, June 4 Fishing Report   
    Here on Lake Taneycomo, we're finally seeing some slower generation after months of high water.  But we're an oasis in the middle of flooding, all around us.  There are so many people affected by flooding,  our hearts go out to them.  We could easily be in the same position if weather patterns shift.
    We've had rain this past week but our watershed hasn't been blanketed with inches, only isolated storms delivering a half-inch at a time which soaks into the ground with little runoff.  So our lakes are not jumping up and generation has slowed.
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been running up to 3 units, starting early in the morning and shutting down after dark but this isn't the case every day.  Today, they are not running water until 2 p.m. which gives those who like to fish from the bank, or dock or wade a chance to enjoy some quiet water.  Hard to say what will happen in the coming days... we are forecasted to get quite a bit of rain this weekend but we will wait and see what falls and where.




    Duane had a guide trip this morning, early, and Steve did great throwing a stick bait.  He landed 4 rainbows over 20 inches, all in the lower trophy area.
    Speaking of scuds, a beaded scud under an indicator works well, using 6x or 2-pound line from Short Creek up.  So will a zebra midge.  I really don't have specific colors and sizes because I haven't been out to try it yet.  Same size tippet on the Zebras.
    Air injected night crawlers almost always catches fish anywhere on the upper lake but especially in the Short Creek area.

    The pink Powerworm caught this 15-pound brown in the Short Creek area last week.  We like to think a brown is smarter than that, growing from a 12-inch stocker to a 30-inch brute without being caught.  Taking a pink Powerworm shouldn't have been on this guy's menu.
    See all the trophies caught and released on our Trophy Page.
    Black/Olive marabou jigs have been doing pretty good so far this week, even out fishing the sculpin/peach jig.  White is still the color on the first half-mile of the lake, then switch to the darker colors.

  12. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, June 4 Fishing Report   
    Here on Lake Taneycomo, we're finally seeing some slower generation after months of high water.  But we're an oasis in the middle of flooding, all around us.  There are so many people affected by flooding,  our hearts go out to them.  We could easily be in the same position if weather patterns shift.
    We've had rain this past week but our watershed hasn't been blanketed with inches, only isolated storms delivering a half-inch at a time which soaks into the ground with little runoff.  So our lakes are not jumping up and generation has slowed.
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been running up to 3 units, starting early in the morning and shutting down after dark but this isn't the case every day.  Today, they are not running water until 2 p.m. which gives those who like to fish from the bank, or dock or wade a chance to enjoy some quiet water.  Hard to say what will happen in the coming days... we are forecasted to get quite a bit of rain this weekend but we will wait and see what falls and where.




    Duane had a guide trip this morning, early, and Steve did great throwing a stick bait.  He landed 4 rainbows over 20 inches, all in the lower trophy area.
    Speaking of scuds, a beaded scud under an indicator works well, using 6x or 2-pound line from Short Creek up.  So will a zebra midge.  I really don't have specific colors and sizes because I haven't been out to try it yet.  Same size tippet on the Zebras.
    Air injected night crawlers almost always catches fish anywhere on the upper lake but especially in the Short Creek area.

    The pink Powerworm caught this 15-pound brown in the Short Creek area last week.  We like to think a brown is smarter than that, growing from a 12-inch stocker to a 30-inch brute without being caught.  Taking a pink Powerworm shouldn't have been on this guy's menu.
    See all the trophies caught and released on our Trophy Page.
    Black/Olive marabou jigs have been doing pretty good so far this week, even out fishing the sculpin/peach jig.  White is still the color on the first half-mile of the lake, then switch to the darker colors.

  13. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, Taneycomo Fishing Report, May 29   
    I'm writing a fishing report for the Kansas City Star this morning.  The deadline is today at noon.  But because of the timing of this report, most of it is speculation on my part.  Why?  Because conditions have changed in the last 24 hours, and they will change again in the next 24 hours.  Let me try to explain.
    On May 1, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened five spill gates at Table Rock Dam, releasing 5,000 cubic feet per second of water to make up for a turbine that was down.  The combined flow was 15,000 c.f.s..  This has been the release rate every day up until yesterday at 1 p.m. when officials shut those gates as well as one turbine.  Last night, they shut down all turbines -- so zero generation.  Big change.
    Today, we will have several rounds of storms move through the area dumping an estimated one to four inches of rain on our watershed.  That will send lake levels up, and will force the Corps to start the flow again.  The big questions are how much rain and how much flow?
    Beaver Lake is at 1,126 feet, five feet over power pool.  Table Rock is pretty much at power pool since it is recorded now as 916-917 feet.  But officials have shown they're not messing around with any water over power pool on Table Rock, releasing at least 15,000 c.f.s. of water if the lake goes over that power pool mark.  Beaver, on the other, hand historically has held water right up until  near flood stage which is 1,130 feet.
    What does slower generation mean on Taneycomo?  For most fishermen it means easier fishing.  Easier because there's less water to deal with --- less flow, less depth.  But there's something else to mess with your mind . . .  colder water.  With no spill gates, the water coming through the turbines is about 46 degrees.  This is about 10 degrees colder than the combined flow of gates and turbines we've been seeing.  Will that slow down the bite?  It may for a short time, but I wouldn't worry about it too much.  The change in flow will make trout move and adapt, which may slow the bite down a bit, too.
    I  fished last evening after the gates closed and  found fishing pretty good, not great, but good.  I fished basically from the dam to just past the Narrows (all in the trophy area) and caught rainbows consistently on mainly a white jig. They didn't want a darker jig.  Of course, our trout have had a ton of food to eat all winter and spring so they're all beefed up.
    We started reporting that drifting scuds was the ticket earlier in the spring, and for the last couple of weeks we've had a run on the flies.  I think there's a ton of people that thought a scud was a missile -- ones who had never used a fly before, much less drifted one like a night crawler.  But we've sold over a thousand of the bugs this month, and I don't think the fly is going to lose its effectiveness any time soon.  Side note:  If you're a fly tyer and want to tie scuds for our shop, please let us know!!!
    I could go on and report on what has been working,  but it's hard because I don't know what our water condition will be in the coming days.  I will say if the flow stays down -- less than 15,000 c.f.s. -- use the same thing that's been working but with less weight.  Same jigs but smaller.  Rig some rods with two-pound line because the smaller 1/16th- and 1/32nd-ounce jigs will start working.  
    One thing that's great about less water -- dock fishing should be decent!  Easier for sure.  And anglers who like to wade below the dam will have more options.
    Stay tuned!
  14. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MoCarp for a article, Taneycomo Fishing Report, May 29   
    I'm writing a fishing report for the Kansas City Star this morning.  The deadline is today at noon.  But because of the timing of this report, most of it is speculation on my part.  Why?  Because conditions have changed in the last 24 hours, and they will change again in the next 24 hours.  Let me try to explain.
    On May 1, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened five spill gates at Table Rock Dam, releasing 5,000 cubic feet per second of water to make up for a turbine that was down.  The combined flow was 15,000 c.f.s..  This has been the release rate every day up until yesterday at 1 p.m. when officials shut those gates as well as one turbine.  Last night, they shut down all turbines -- so zero generation.  Big change.
    Today, we will have several rounds of storms move through the area dumping an estimated one to four inches of rain on our watershed.  That will send lake levels up, and will force the Corps to start the flow again.  The big questions are how much rain and how much flow?
    Beaver Lake is at 1,126 feet, five feet over power pool.  Table Rock is pretty much at power pool since it is recorded now as 916-917 feet.  But officials have shown they're not messing around with any water over power pool on Table Rock, releasing at least 15,000 c.f.s. of water if the lake goes over that power pool mark.  Beaver, on the other, hand historically has held water right up until  near flood stage which is 1,130 feet.
    What does slower generation mean on Taneycomo?  For most fishermen it means easier fishing.  Easier because there's less water to deal with --- less flow, less depth.  But there's something else to mess with your mind . . .  colder water.  With no spill gates, the water coming through the turbines is about 46 degrees.  This is about 10 degrees colder than the combined flow of gates and turbines we've been seeing.  Will that slow down the bite?  It may for a short time, but I wouldn't worry about it too much.  The change in flow will make trout move and adapt, which may slow the bite down a bit, too.
    I  fished last evening after the gates closed and  found fishing pretty good, not great, but good.  I fished basically from the dam to just past the Narrows (all in the trophy area) and caught rainbows consistently on mainly a white jig. They didn't want a darker jig.  Of course, our trout have had a ton of food to eat all winter and spring so they're all beefed up.
    We started reporting that drifting scuds was the ticket earlier in the spring, and for the last couple of weeks we've had a run on the flies.  I think there's a ton of people that thought a scud was a missile -- ones who had never used a fly before, much less drifted one like a night crawler.  But we've sold over a thousand of the bugs this month, and I don't think the fly is going to lose its effectiveness any time soon.  Side note:  If you're a fly tyer and want to tie scuds for our shop, please let us know!!!
    I could go on and report on what has been working,  but it's hard because I don't know what our water condition will be in the coming days.  I will say if the flow stays down -- less than 15,000 c.f.s. -- use the same thing that's been working but with less weight.  Same jigs but smaller.  Rig some rods with two-pound line because the smaller 1/16th- and 1/32nd-ounce jigs will start working.  
    One thing that's great about less water -- dock fishing should be decent!  Easier for sure.  And anglers who like to wade below the dam will have more options.
    Stay tuned!
  15. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, May 11 Lake Taneycomo Report   
    This has been one wet and cold spring here in the Ozarks! But we are not complaining because there are many regions suffering adverse conditions . . . and we know what flooding is like!
    With all the rain we expect  to see generation for a long time. Both Table Rock and Beaver Lakes are high — not flooding — but high enough to warrant 15,000 cubic feet per second releases from Table Rock. That equates to four full turbines, but one turbine is still off line, so officials are releasing 5,000 c.f.s. over the spill gates. That’s making trout fishing very rewarding here.
    Why? The water coming over the top is about 60 degrees, and the water running through the turbines is about 44 degrees.  Our trout like the warmer water as well as the bugs in Lake Taneycomo. There are big midge hatches every day, and the fish are absolutely full of scuds (freshwater shrimp.)  Plus we’re witnessing a few threadfin shad come over the spill gates.
    Fishing is good out of boats but not so good from the bank or docks. The water is high and fast and it’s tough to get a good presentation to the fish from a stationery position. One needs to be out drifting to have a chance to catch anything right now.
    Catching has honestly picked up the last few days. Before that, it seemed like the trout went into hiding. Even drifting in front of our dock is good. Saturday  morning we watched a group in our pontoons land a double — that’s two anglers with fish on at the same time!
      Duane Doty works for us and guides here, too. On many of his trips, he’s splitting his time between throwing jigs, drifting scuds and shad flies, and throwing jerk baits. But with a friend Saturday morning, he started early and fished through the rain.  They boated 40 trout on his signature custom jerk bait. It’s the body of a Megabass 110 plus but painted to look like either a sculpin or a brown trout.
    Most of Duane Doty’s fishing is in the trophy area.
    We’ve been doing exceptionally well drifting scuds close to the bottom. We’re drifting between the dam all the way down to Short Creek,  but the trout are not liking them below Short Creek. But even from Fall Creek down, we’re seeing some really nice-sized rainbows, up to 18 inches long. Stay in the middle of the lake, not on the bluff side when drifting and use a #4 split shot, either on line line up from the scud or replace the bell weight on a drift rig, assuming you’re using four-pound line. You may not feel the bottom, but this arrangement will keep your flies from gathering algae from the bottom and gumming up your chances of catching a fish.
    Use a good-sized scud — #12, #10 or even a #8. Gray is working well, but also try an olive or tan scud. Use a scud that has some ultraviolet flash tied in for when the day turns sunny.
    From the dam down, use a #5 split shot. It’s a little heavier than a #4, and you’ll need it to keep close to the bottom. Be patient. Let your offering get to the bottom gradually. The takes are subtle but sure.
    If you want to keep a limit of fish, fish the trophy area and keep rainbows a little less than 12 inches. They eat just fine.
    I’ve been having fairly good results throwing jigs lately. Again, catching is getting better and better.

    White is fairly good but only up close to the cable below the dam. I’d switch to brown, black or sculpin when drifting past the first island below the dam. I’m also using 3/32nd-ounce Lilleys’  jigs — not 1/8th ounce — and having better luck. It seems like the slower I work it, letting it sink slowly, the better. An 1/8th-ounce just sinks too fast, and I’m not getting bit as well. Now this does depend on the wind.  If it’s too windy, you have to use an 1/8th-ounce. I’m using four-pound line when throwing either jig.
    I’m working the bluff bank from Lookout to Fall Creek, throwing into the slow areas, eddies along the deep channel bank. That’s where the fish are holding, and it’s been incredibly fun to see the fish chase and take the jig because the water is so clear.
     
     
  16. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tho1mas for a article, May 11 Lake Taneycomo Report   
    This has been one wet and cold spring here in the Ozarks! But we are not complaining because there are many regions suffering adverse conditions . . . and we know what flooding is like!
    With all the rain we expect  to see generation for a long time. Both Table Rock and Beaver Lakes are high — not flooding — but high enough to warrant 15,000 cubic feet per second releases from Table Rock. That equates to four full turbines, but one turbine is still off line, so officials are releasing 5,000 c.f.s. over the spill gates. That’s making trout fishing very rewarding here.
    Why? The water coming over the top is about 60 degrees, and the water running through the turbines is about 44 degrees.  Our trout like the warmer water as well as the bugs in Lake Taneycomo. There are big midge hatches every day, and the fish are absolutely full of scuds (freshwater shrimp.)  Plus we’re witnessing a few threadfin shad come over the spill gates.
    Fishing is good out of boats but not so good from the bank or docks. The water is high and fast and it’s tough to get a good presentation to the fish from a stationery position. One needs to be out drifting to have a chance to catch anything right now.
    Catching has honestly picked up the last few days. Before that, it seemed like the trout went into hiding. Even drifting in front of our dock is good. Saturday  morning we watched a group in our pontoons land a double — that’s two anglers with fish on at the same time!
      Duane Doty works for us and guides here, too. On many of his trips, he’s splitting his time between throwing jigs, drifting scuds and shad flies, and throwing jerk baits. But with a friend Saturday morning, he started early and fished through the rain.  They boated 40 trout on his signature custom jerk bait. It’s the body of a Megabass 110 plus but painted to look like either a sculpin or a brown trout.
    Most of Duane Doty’s fishing is in the trophy area.
    We’ve been doing exceptionally well drifting scuds close to the bottom. We’re drifting between the dam all the way down to Short Creek,  but the trout are not liking them below Short Creek. But even from Fall Creek down, we’re seeing some really nice-sized rainbows, up to 18 inches long. Stay in the middle of the lake, not on the bluff side when drifting and use a #4 split shot, either on line line up from the scud or replace the bell weight on a drift rig, assuming you’re using four-pound line. You may not feel the bottom, but this arrangement will keep your flies from gathering algae from the bottom and gumming up your chances of catching a fish.
    Use a good-sized scud — #12, #10 or even a #8. Gray is working well, but also try an olive or tan scud. Use a scud that has some ultraviolet flash tied in for when the day turns sunny.
    From the dam down, use a #5 split shot. It’s a little heavier than a #4, and you’ll need it to keep close to the bottom. Be patient. Let your offering get to the bottom gradually. The takes are subtle but sure.
    If you want to keep a limit of fish, fish the trophy area and keep rainbows a little less than 12 inches. They eat just fine.
    I’ve been having fairly good results throwing jigs lately. Again, catching is getting better and better.

    White is fairly good but only up close to the cable below the dam. I’d switch to brown, black or sculpin when drifting past the first island below the dam. I’m also using 3/32nd-ounce Lilleys’  jigs — not 1/8th ounce — and having better luck. It seems like the slower I work it, letting it sink slowly, the better. An 1/8th-ounce just sinks too fast, and I’m not getting bit as well. Now this does depend on the wind.  If it’s too windy, you have to use an 1/8th-ounce. I’m using four-pound line when throwing either jig.
    I’m working the bluff bank from Lookout to Fall Creek, throwing into the slow areas, eddies along the deep channel bank. That’s where the fish are holding, and it’s been incredibly fun to see the fish chase and take the jig because the water is so clear.
     
     
  17. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tho1mas for a article, Taneycomo Report, May 7   
    Quick and concise...  recent rains have brought our lakes up to levels which warrant some concern.  Beaver Lake is now approaching 1125.5 feet, only 4.5 feet from its flood pool while Table Rock hovers at 920 feet, that magical level that calls for flood gates and flows at 20,000 c.f.s..   But Table Rock Dam is now running 3 turbines full while one turbine is down for maintenance so 5 spill gates are open 1 foot each to make up for the 4th turbine, equaling 15,000 c.f.s of flow.  Four gates were open for about 24 hours yesterday when Table Rock's level reached 920.3 feet but dropped below 920 feet this morning.  All the while, Bull Shoals is rising and is now at 672.7 feet, almost 10 feet higher than a week ago.
    Taney's water temperature is 54 degrees on the spill side, 44 degrees on the turbine side.  When the extra gates were open we saw 60 degree water and a push of threadfin shad, just not as many as we'd like to see.  I think we got a deposit of warm water fish too, white bass, walleye and small mouth bass.
    White jigs have not taken off like we would have hoped with the spill gates open but fishing is fairly good.  Some are fishing a 1/32nd ounce white jig under a float 10-12 feet deep the first 3 miles of the lake while others are throwing 1/8th to 3/32nd ounce jigs straight, 4-pound line.  I'm also using our sculpin/peach jigs and doing pretty good too.  Spoons - silver Cleo or Boyaunt - are working well too.
    Work the eddies all the way down to Fall Creek using an 1/8th ounce earth color jigs like black, brown or sculpin.
    Below Fall Creek, drift minnows, night crawlers and Berkley Powerworm in pink, red or while on the bottom using drift rigs.  The word is the trout are not in the creeks right now for some reason but if you're out and want to try, I would because they really should be in there.
    The water isn't going to be as fast down at the Landing so fishing down there will be easier.
    With this high water, watch where you're drifting and stay mid lake.  Don't anchor in current and wear a life jacket if you're at all uncomfortable in swift water.
  18. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MickinMO for a article, Taneycomo Report, May 7   
    Quick and concise...  recent rains have brought our lakes up to levels which warrant some concern.  Beaver Lake is now approaching 1125.5 feet, only 4.5 feet from its flood pool while Table Rock hovers at 920 feet, that magical level that calls for flood gates and flows at 20,000 c.f.s..   But Table Rock Dam is now running 3 turbines full while one turbine is down for maintenance so 5 spill gates are open 1 foot each to make up for the 4th turbine, equaling 15,000 c.f.s of flow.  Four gates were open for about 24 hours yesterday when Table Rock's level reached 920.3 feet but dropped below 920 feet this morning.  All the while, Bull Shoals is rising and is now at 672.7 feet, almost 10 feet higher than a week ago.
    Taney's water temperature is 54 degrees on the spill side, 44 degrees on the turbine side.  When the extra gates were open we saw 60 degree water and a push of threadfin shad, just not as many as we'd like to see.  I think we got a deposit of warm water fish too, white bass, walleye and small mouth bass.
    White jigs have not taken off like we would have hoped with the spill gates open but fishing is fairly good.  Some are fishing a 1/32nd ounce white jig under a float 10-12 feet deep the first 3 miles of the lake while others are throwing 1/8th to 3/32nd ounce jigs straight, 4-pound line.  I'm also using our sculpin/peach jigs and doing pretty good too.  Spoons - silver Cleo or Boyaunt - are working well too.
    Work the eddies all the way down to Fall Creek using an 1/8th ounce earth color jigs like black, brown or sculpin.
    Below Fall Creek, drift minnows, night crawlers and Berkley Powerworm in pink, red or while on the bottom using drift rigs.  The word is the trout are not in the creeks right now for some reason but if you're out and want to try, I would because they really should be in there.
    The water isn't going to be as fast down at the Landing so fishing down there will be easier.
    With this high water, watch where you're drifting and stay mid lake.  Don't anchor in current and wear a life jacket if you're at all uncomfortable in swift water.
  19. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Taneycomo Report, May 7   
    Quick and concise...  recent rains have brought our lakes up to levels which warrant some concern.  Beaver Lake is now approaching 1125.5 feet, only 4.5 feet from its flood pool while Table Rock hovers at 920 feet, that magical level that calls for flood gates and flows at 20,000 c.f.s..   But Table Rock Dam is now running 3 turbines full while one turbine is down for maintenance so 5 spill gates are open 1 foot each to make up for the 4th turbine, equaling 15,000 c.f.s of flow.  Four gates were open for about 24 hours yesterday when Table Rock's level reached 920.3 feet but dropped below 920 feet this morning.  All the while, Bull Shoals is rising and is now at 672.7 feet, almost 10 feet higher than a week ago.
    Taney's water temperature is 54 degrees on the spill side, 44 degrees on the turbine side.  When the extra gates were open we saw 60 degree water and a push of threadfin shad, just not as many as we'd like to see.  I think we got a deposit of warm water fish too, white bass, walleye and small mouth bass.
    White jigs have not taken off like we would have hoped with the spill gates open but fishing is fairly good.  Some are fishing a 1/32nd ounce white jig under a float 10-12 feet deep the first 3 miles of the lake while others are throwing 1/8th to 3/32nd ounce jigs straight, 4-pound line.  I'm also using our sculpin/peach jigs and doing pretty good too.  Spoons - silver Cleo or Boyaunt - are working well too.
    Work the eddies all the way down to Fall Creek using an 1/8th ounce earth color jigs like black, brown or sculpin.
    Below Fall Creek, drift minnows, night crawlers and Berkley Powerworm in pink, red or while on the bottom using drift rigs.  The word is the trout are not in the creeks right now for some reason but if you're out and want to try, I would because they really should be in there.
    The water isn't going to be as fast down at the Landing so fishing down there will be easier.
    With this high water, watch where you're drifting and stay mid lake.  Don't anchor in current and wear a life jacket if you're at all uncomfortable in swift water.
  20. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Dhunter1 for a article, National Youth Fishing Tournament   
    I had the honor today to captain a couple of Jr High boys from Springfield in the aforementioned tournament today on Table Rock.  I had William and Sam Kuzemka in my boat.  We launched out of State Park, first cast at 6:35 a.m. on the first point NW of the ramp close to the Branson Belle.
    They started out throwing a swim bait (grub) but I quickly switched them to a ned and it was on.  They fished my smallmouth banks in Jakes, Powerline and Clevenger Coves... all the ones I could remember.  I don't think I got over there any last spring so I was going off my long-time memory.
    Set the boat in 16-20 feet most of the time until the fog burned off about 10 a.m., then we backed out to 30 feet.  I had them fish the bottom although every 3rd or 4th cast came back with the green slime.
    They had about 13 keepers, all smallies expect one spot.  We culled a couple of 16-inchers and had one kicker brown about 3.5 pounds.  All bass except the spot appeared to have spawned - they had no pouches at all.... but what do I know, I'm a trout guy.  Had may be the same number of shots plus 3-4 nice gogs (which I'm going back for this week!!).
    The boys weighed in at 13.58 and took 2nd out of 60 teams.
    260 teams in the high school division... weigh in at White Water.  Needless to say there was a traffic jam getting into the lot, which was basically full when I left at the beginning of the High School weigh in period.  I hope they pulled it together cause .... well you know.
    Ulrich was there with 2 pontoons/tanks for the catches.  Babler said they do a good job keeping them alive and back in the lake.







  21. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, National Youth Fishing Tournament   
    I had the honor today to captain a couple of Jr High boys from Springfield in the aforementioned tournament today on Table Rock.  I had William and Sam Kuzemka in my boat.  We launched out of State Park, first cast at 6:35 a.m. on the first point NW of the ramp close to the Branson Belle.
    They started out throwing a swim bait (grub) but I quickly switched them to a ned and it was on.  They fished my smallmouth banks in Jakes, Powerline and Clevenger Coves... all the ones I could remember.  I don't think I got over there any last spring so I was going off my long-time memory.
    Set the boat in 16-20 feet most of the time until the fog burned off about 10 a.m., then we backed out to 30 feet.  I had them fish the bottom although every 3rd or 4th cast came back with the green slime.
    They had about 13 keepers, all smallies expect one spot.  We culled a couple of 16-inchers and had one kicker brown about 3.5 pounds.  All bass except the spot appeared to have spawned - they had no pouches at all.... but what do I know, I'm a trout guy.  Had may be the same number of shots plus 3-4 nice gogs (which I'm going back for this week!!).
    The boys weighed in at 13.58 and took 2nd out of 60 teams.
    260 teams in the high school division... weigh in at White Water.  Needless to say there was a traffic jam getting into the lot, which was basically full when I left at the beginning of the High School weigh in period.  I hope they pulled it together cause .... well you know.
    Ulrich was there with 2 pontoons/tanks for the catches.  Babler said they do a good job keeping them alive and back in the lake.







  22. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from ness for a article, National Youth Fishing Tournament   
    I had the honor today to captain a couple of Jr High boys from Springfield in the aforementioned tournament today on Table Rock.  I had William and Sam Kuzemka in my boat.  We launched out of State Park, first cast at 6:35 a.m. on the first point NW of the ramp close to the Branson Belle.
    They started out throwing a swim bait (grub) but I quickly switched them to a ned and it was on.  They fished my smallmouth banks in Jakes, Powerline and Clevenger Coves... all the ones I could remember.  I don't think I got over there any last spring so I was going off my long-time memory.
    Set the boat in 16-20 feet most of the time until the fog burned off about 10 a.m., then we backed out to 30 feet.  I had them fish the bottom although every 3rd or 4th cast came back with the green slime.
    They had about 13 keepers, all smallies expect one spot.  We culled a couple of 16-inchers and had one kicker brown about 3.5 pounds.  All bass except the spot appeared to have spawned - they had no pouches at all.... but what do I know, I'm a trout guy.  Had may be the same number of shots plus 3-4 nice gogs (which I'm going back for this week!!).
    The boys weighed in at 13.58 and took 2nd out of 60 teams.
    260 teams in the high school division... weigh in at White Water.  Needless to say there was a traffic jam getting into the lot, which was basically full when I left at the beginning of the High School weigh in period.  I hope they pulled it together cause .... well you know.
    Ulrich was there with 2 pontoons/tanks for the catches.  Babler said they do a good job keeping them alive and back in the lake.







  23. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from nomolites for a article, National Youth Fishing Tournament   
    I had the honor today to captain a couple of Jr High boys from Springfield in the aforementioned tournament today on Table Rock.  I had William and Sam Kuzemka in my boat.  We launched out of State Park, first cast at 6:35 a.m. on the first point NW of the ramp close to the Branson Belle.
    They started out throwing a swim bait (grub) but I quickly switched them to a ned and it was on.  They fished my smallmouth banks in Jakes, Powerline and Clevenger Coves... all the ones I could remember.  I don't think I got over there any last spring so I was going off my long-time memory.
    Set the boat in 16-20 feet most of the time until the fog burned off about 10 a.m., then we backed out to 30 feet.  I had them fish the bottom although every 3rd or 4th cast came back with the green slime.
    They had about 13 keepers, all smallies expect one spot.  We culled a couple of 16-inchers and had one kicker brown about 3.5 pounds.  All bass except the spot appeared to have spawned - they had no pouches at all.... but what do I know, I'm a trout guy.  Had may be the same number of shots plus 3-4 nice gogs (which I'm going back for this week!!).
    The boys weighed in at 13.58 and took 2nd out of 60 teams.
    260 teams in the high school division... weigh in at White Water.  Needless to say there was a traffic jam getting into the lot, which was basically full when I left at the beginning of the High School weigh in period.  I hope they pulled it together cause .... well you know.
    Ulrich was there with 2 pontoons/tanks for the catches.  Babler said they do a good job keeping them alive and back in the lake.







  24. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Lake Taneycomo Maps   
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Upper Lake Taneycomo

    Taneycomo Lake Map.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Lower Trophy Area

    Lower Trophy.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Table Rock Dam to Monkey Island - Lake Taneycomo 

    Dam to Monkey Island.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Monkey Island to Bee Creek - Lake Taneycomo

    Monkey Island to Bee Creek.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Lower Lake Taneycomo

    Lower Taneycomo.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Bull Creek Area - Lake Taneycomo 

    Bull Creek Map.pdf
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  25. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Greasy B for a article, April 9 Taneycomo Fishing Report   
    It's been hard to sit down and write a fishing report because of the uncertainty of conditions lately.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened four spill gates last Monday and left those gates opened exactly one foot each for one week.  I speculated that the opening of the gates would be temporary, only a couple of days, but that was not the case. So now that the gates are closed, and the work has been completed at the dam, I can evaluate future conditions . . .  maybe.
    The release rate presently is 6,500 cubic feet per second (C.F.S.), Taneycomo's lake level is at 707.6 feet.  Dam operators are running it around the clock, and Table Rock Lake's level is dropping about two inches per day, 915.42 feet.  Power pool is 915 feet.  Beaver Lake is shut down and holding at 1,120 feet.  Their seasonal power pool is 1,120.43 feet.  Our water temperature is 43 degrees.
    I would speculate we will see this flow for the next few days, until Table Rock's level drops to 915 feet... but you never know.
    Our trout did see a good number of threadfin shad flow into Taneycomo from Table Rock through the spill gates, and now they are looking for about anything that looks like a threadfin -- white jigs, white hard baits, white flies.  Even spoons and spinners will work.  These fish can be aggressive in their feeding, especially the bigger browns and rainbows that are used to eating bigger meals, like other trout and forage fish.  So wake baits and larger jerk baits seem to be the ticket if you're fishing for trophies.
    With two units running, you can easily boat up to the dam, but just stay in the middle of the lake.  We're using 3/32nd- to 1/16th-ounce white jigs, throwing them straight with no float and smaller 1/32nd-ounce jigs under a float four to seven-feet deep.  Switch out the color if they're not taking white to sculpin, sculpin/ginger, black/olive or white/gray.
    Those who are throwing big jerk baits are throwing a Megabass 110+ in shad colors.  If you don't want to spend the big bucks on a Megabass, throw a Rouge or Rapala.  Suspending baits seemed to work better than floating or sinking.
    This is the time of year when we start to see a lot of green moss on the bottom of our lake, so drifting anything on the bottom is hampered by the green stuff.  But that's not to say you can't catch trout by drifting a gray or olive scud, egg fly, San Juan Worm or a shad fly on the bottom. I'd recommend using very little weight and no weighted flies, if possible.  Better yet, use a float and fish any of these flies under it four-  to eight-feet deep.
    Below Fall Creek, night crawlers are doing about the best along with minnows.  Minnows would be excellent because we know the threadfin shad have made it all the way down past Fall Creek, so those fish have seen and eaten a bunch of them.  White jigs are also pretty hot, even past Lilleys' Landing and Cooper Creek.
    Our guides are back to using the pink and red Berkley's PowerWorm under a float eight- to 10-feet deep.  The best area is from Monkey Island down past the Landing, according to Steve Dickey who had just brought in a happy group of clients.  He said they're having to thin through smaller stocker rainbows to get the nice ones, but they are for sure there!
    Another group of guys staying here brought in some nice rainbows which they caught drifting down by the Landing on white/orange PowerEggs with a pinch of worm on the hook.  You can't argue with success!  I did overhear some talking yesterday that they tried trolling and were surprised they did very well.  They were using a blue Rebel.
    Here are some pictures of trout caught over the weekend by anglers who fished in our CAM benefit tournament.
     




    These were all 20-inches-plus, the last one  24 inches caught on a white jig.  David Beal and Seth Turner.



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