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Phil Lilley

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  1. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from JestersHK for a article, Doty-Lilley Crappie Trip 4/29-30   
    We left Branson about 2:30 yesterday for Stockton, Marsha, MonaCheri, Duane and myself, with Duane's boat in tow.  Our target was to put in at Sons Creek and fish the evening, stay at Stone Creek Lodge (good friends Kris and Amanda Nelson, owners) and fish again Monday morning before heading back.
    Put in about 4:30 and headed out.  Water temp about 64 degrees I think and windy.  Seemed like it was out of the SE but was hard to tell not being used to the lake and direction.  Duane has a nice fish finder... and we looked for fish.  We went over to the left bank heading out and started there.  
    Duane is going to have to add to my report because he has better knowledge of water temp and depth.
    I caught the first fish on a chart/red tube jig - a 19 inch walleye.  Thought it was on!  But of course there's a big leaning curve in most fishing trips.  We dinked around that area, up and down the bank, marking fish all over the place but couldn't get them to bite.  Did catch one here and there, mostly keepers.  Then MonaCheri stumbled onto the pattern... trolling.
    I'm glad we caught in on the video... she set her rod down to check her phone.  She's a birder and had been "talking" to a little yellow bird (MC can chime in and add to the report too if she wants to name the little bird).  After catching one while not doing anything but moving along, she caught another one, and it was one.
    We ran out of deep water and turned around.  Catching picked up as it got darker.  Started catching some shorts but most were over 11 inches.  The battery ran out on my GoPro and it was on silent so we didn't notice it until we were done.  Too bad... we had doubles and triples... lots of stumbling around trying to net fish and untangle lines.
    We ended with 25 crappie, 7 whites and the walleye.
    After cleaning our fish at the lodge, we decided we weren't going to get out early Monday - the girls vetoed 5 a.m. wake up call.  So we didn't get out he water till after 9 a.m. Monday.  The wind was already blowing, we tried the same area with little success.  The troll bite wasn't there.  Pulling up in a cut Kris told us about, we got out and headed inland looking for some mushrooms.  Found a few.
    We ended finding some crappies on the south bank in deep water but they didn't want to play very hard.  We gave our 3 crappies and 1 white to a guy at the ramp, pulling out about 12:30.
    We had a wonderful time... and the fishing was even pretty good.  Look forward to going back again.
     
  2. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Bonnots Mill angler snags state-record blue sucker   
    MDC congratulates Bryant Rackers on breaking the state record by snagging a 9-pound, 1-ounce blue sucker on the Osage River.
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports Bryant Rackers of Bonnots Mill became the most recent record-breaking angler in Missouri when he snagged a blue sucker on the Osage River. The new “alternative method” record fish snagged by Rackers on April 21 weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce with a length of 30 inches. Rackers’ recent catch broke the previous state-record of 7-pound, 6-ounces, caught in 1980.
    “I knew I snagged a couple pretty nice fish during that day, but I didn’t think anything about it until I weighed the larger blue sucker, and after checking online I realized that I had a new state record fish,” Rackers said.
    MDC staff verified the blue sucker’s weight by weighing it on a certified scale in Jefferson City.
    Once MDC staff confirmed that fish was a new state record, Rackers said he was very excited. “I can’t believe I finally hold a state record in Missouri for catching the largest fish,” he said. “This hopefully won’t be the last time you see my name because I’m going after other state records now.”
    Rackers said he plans on getting the state-record blue sucker mounted.
    Missouri state-record fish are recognized in two categories: pole-and-line and alternative methods. Alternative methods include: throwlines, trotlines, limb lines, bank lines, jug lines, spearfishing, snagging, snaring, gigging, grabbing, archery, and atlatl. For more information on state-record fish, visit the MDC website at http://on.mo.gov/2efq1vl.

    Congratulations to Bryant Rackers on breaking the state record by snagging a 9-pound, 1-ounce blue sucker on the Osage River.
  3. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MoCarp for a article, Bonnots Mill angler snags state-record blue sucker   
    MDC congratulates Bryant Rackers on breaking the state record by snagging a 9-pound, 1-ounce blue sucker on the Osage River.
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports Bryant Rackers of Bonnots Mill became the most recent record-breaking angler in Missouri when he snagged a blue sucker on the Osage River. The new “alternative method” record fish snagged by Rackers on April 21 weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce with a length of 30 inches. Rackers’ recent catch broke the previous state-record of 7-pound, 6-ounces, caught in 1980.
    “I knew I snagged a couple pretty nice fish during that day, but I didn’t think anything about it until I weighed the larger blue sucker, and after checking online I realized that I had a new state record fish,” Rackers said.
    MDC staff verified the blue sucker’s weight by weighing it on a certified scale in Jefferson City.
    Once MDC staff confirmed that fish was a new state record, Rackers said he was very excited. “I can’t believe I finally hold a state record in Missouri for catching the largest fish,” he said. “This hopefully won’t be the last time you see my name because I’m going after other state records now.”
    Rackers said he plans on getting the state-record blue sucker mounted.
    Missouri state-record fish are recognized in two categories: pole-and-line and alternative methods. Alternative methods include: throwlines, trotlines, limb lines, bank lines, jug lines, spearfishing, snagging, snaring, gigging, grabbing, archery, and atlatl. For more information on state-record fish, visit the MDC website at http://on.mo.gov/2efq1vl.

    Congratulations to Bryant Rackers on breaking the state record by snagging a 9-pound, 1-ounce blue sucker on the Osage River.
  4. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from kdc for a article, Long Creek Crappie   
    Put in at Long Creek Ramp at 4 p.m. and boated up (left from ramp).  Hit a few old spots - first one produced a nice keeper right off the bat.  Lost another, then the spot went cold.  Moved around, nothing.  Tried another spot, nothing.  Then went to good spot #2 and found a real hot spot - caught 4 real quick.  Noticed baby thread fin against this bank and the crappie were under them.  Moved around and caught another.  Went back to spot #1 and caught 3 more keepers. Ended with 8.
    Didn't have to measure any... all over 12 inches.  Haven't cleaned them yet- they're in a live tank so I don't know what they are but I bet males.
    Caught all but one on a smoke swimming minnow on a 1/16th oz head.  58-59 degree water.  I caught most within 8 feet of the bank in 4-8 feet of water, a few out from the bank in 15 feet suspended.  Really none on brush.



    Spot #1 has a green MDC structure sign in the back, 3 cuts from the ramp on the left bank and spot #2 also has a sign and it's the first cut on the left.  Both are kind of corners...  I caught them close to the signs but that wasn't why I fished either spot... I've done well on those banks before they put the brush there.
    Pattern?  Not really any pattern... just covered a lot of area and made a lot of casts.
    Oh yea... caught 15 stinkin' bass too, mostly dinks.

    This post has been promoted to an article
  5. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Johnsfolly for a article, Angler Catches Two Prehistoric Fish Species on the Same Day   
    With his father's help, Zaniel Cole, 8, has done the unthinkable in Oklahoma. Not only did Zaniel snag a 100-pound paddlefish, but he also managed to snag a rare shovelnose sturgeon the very same day! Paddlefish and shovelnose sturgeon are distant cousins in the order Acipenseriformes and date to the time of the dinosaurs, which is why they are referred to as "prehistoric fishes."
    Although they are the most abundant sturgeon in North America, shovelnose sturgeon numbers have declined over the past century and they are rare in Oklahoma. So, catching a shovelnose sturgeon the same day as a 100-pound paddlefish is a notable thrill.
    Shovelnose sturgeon are not federally protected in Oklahoma, but they are listed as a Species of Special Concern in Category II. This means there is insufficient information to adequately evaluate the population status or species trend in Oklahoma. Harvest of shovelnose sturgeon is legal with a limit of one per day. However, any shovelnose sturgeon caught in the state is required to be reported to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.  
    Zaniel and his father, Adam, released the shovelnose sturgeon and reported their catch to the Wildlife Department. Their story was shared on the Wildlife Department's Facebook page and has quickly become very popular. 
    Learn more about the shovelnose sturgeon in the upcoming May/June issue of Outdoor Oklahoma, the official Wildlife Department magazine.


    Anglers should take special precautions when handling paddlefish. It is best to avoid holding or grabbing the fish by its jaw or gills. Just remember to #HugAPaddlefish (Photos Courtesy of Adam Cole)
  6. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from snagged in outlet 3 for a article, Angler Catches Two Prehistoric Fish Species on the Same Day   
    With his father's help, Zaniel Cole, 8, has done the unthinkable in Oklahoma. Not only did Zaniel snag a 100-pound paddlefish, but he also managed to snag a rare shovelnose sturgeon the very same day! Paddlefish and shovelnose sturgeon are distant cousins in the order Acipenseriformes and date to the time of the dinosaurs, which is why they are referred to as "prehistoric fishes."
    Although they are the most abundant sturgeon in North America, shovelnose sturgeon numbers have declined over the past century and they are rare in Oklahoma. So, catching a shovelnose sturgeon the same day as a 100-pound paddlefish is a notable thrill.
    Shovelnose sturgeon are not federally protected in Oklahoma, but they are listed as a Species of Special Concern in Category II. This means there is insufficient information to adequately evaluate the population status or species trend in Oklahoma. Harvest of shovelnose sturgeon is legal with a limit of one per day. However, any shovelnose sturgeon caught in the state is required to be reported to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.  
    Zaniel and his father, Adam, released the shovelnose sturgeon and reported their catch to the Wildlife Department. Their story was shared on the Wildlife Department's Facebook page and has quickly become very popular. 
    Learn more about the shovelnose sturgeon in the upcoming May/June issue of Outdoor Oklahoma, the official Wildlife Department magazine.


    Anglers should take special precautions when handling paddlefish. It is best to avoid holding or grabbing the fish by its jaw or gills. Just remember to #HugAPaddlefish (Photos Courtesy of Adam Cole)
  7. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr for a article, Angler Catches Two Prehistoric Fish Species on the Same Day   
    With his father's help, Zaniel Cole, 8, has done the unthinkable in Oklahoma. Not only did Zaniel snag a 100-pound paddlefish, but he also managed to snag a rare shovelnose sturgeon the very same day! Paddlefish and shovelnose sturgeon are distant cousins in the order Acipenseriformes and date to the time of the dinosaurs, which is why they are referred to as "prehistoric fishes."
    Although they are the most abundant sturgeon in North America, shovelnose sturgeon numbers have declined over the past century and they are rare in Oklahoma. So, catching a shovelnose sturgeon the same day as a 100-pound paddlefish is a notable thrill.
    Shovelnose sturgeon are not federally protected in Oklahoma, but they are listed as a Species of Special Concern in Category II. This means there is insufficient information to adequately evaluate the population status or species trend in Oklahoma. Harvest of shovelnose sturgeon is legal with a limit of one per day. However, any shovelnose sturgeon caught in the state is required to be reported to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.  
    Zaniel and his father, Adam, released the shovelnose sturgeon and reported their catch to the Wildlife Department. Their story was shared on the Wildlife Department's Facebook page and has quickly become very popular. 
    Learn more about the shovelnose sturgeon in the upcoming May/June issue of Outdoor Oklahoma, the official Wildlife Department magazine.


    Anglers should take special precautions when handling paddlefish. It is best to avoid holding or grabbing the fish by its jaw or gills. Just remember to #HugAPaddlefish (Photos Courtesy of Adam Cole)
  8. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from trythisonemv for a article, April 17 Fishing Report, Taneycomo   
    Well, we've been through another rain event which, at least for us here on Taneycomo, has ran its course.  Table Rock is back to power pool, and the powers who have run water through Table Rock Dam have cut back flows to a minimum (as of today).  Beaver Lake, on the other hand, remains very high and show no sign of being dropped any time soon.  One good rain puts more water on us, but the 7-day forecast calls for less than 1.5 inches over the area.
    Our lake water looks to be in great condition.  Water temperature is running about 46 degrees coming out of Table Rock Lake and I would expect our water to warm up with days in the 60's and 70's in our near future.  
    Because fishing has been so tough, really for most of the spring so far, there should be a build up of rainbows in the lake, especially from Branson to the dam.  There simply hasn't been the volume of trout cleaned, at least at our cleaning stations lately.
    Before the last rains, our guides and other anglers were catching a lot of rainbows on the pink Berkley's Powerworm under a float.  I saw one of them this morning fishing it in front of our dock and catching fish so I guess they're picking up where they left off.   The BPW should work - I'd use 2-pound line though - to catch more numbers of trout.
    Night crawlers are still one of the hottest baits right now.  With only 35 megawatts of power running (3,000 cfs), I'd only use a small split shot for weight, just enough to get it to the bottom.  We sell drift rigs with 1/8th-ounce bell weights... unfortunately, those are too big for the current we're seeing right now.  Just tie on a #8 hook and pinch a small shot 18 inches above the line.  Two or 4-pound would work fine.
    Don't wad the worm up on the hook... pinch the worm in half and slide the hook through the worm at the center point, letting the worm hang off both sides of the hook.  You don't have to hide the hook at all.  Inject it with air if you want but when drifting it, you really don't have to.
    Jig fishing should be very good with the water as low as it is.  Either throw a jig straight of use it under a float.  The sculpin/ginger or sculpin/peach has been the best color lately with white and white/gray a close second.  I've been throwing black and black/olive a lot with little success, which is surprising.  That was the best color this time last year.
    Fly fishing should be heating up too with the lower water.  We have seen big midge hatches the last few days and the barn swallows are back in big numbers.  You can tell when there's a hatch because the swallows are swarming all over the surface of the lake picking off bugs as they hatch off the water.  So midges - soft hackles and zebra midges should be good as well as cracklebacks.
    I'm being pretty general in my reporting because we haven't been out enough to see how the trout are reacting to this new generation pattern.  But we are looking forward to doing some more scouting very soon!
  9. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MickinMO for a article, April 17 Fishing Report, Taneycomo   
    Well, we've been through another rain event which, at least for us here on Taneycomo, has ran its course.  Table Rock is back to power pool, and the powers who have run water through Table Rock Dam have cut back flows to a minimum (as of today).  Beaver Lake, on the other hand, remains very high and show no sign of being dropped any time soon.  One good rain puts more water on us, but the 7-day forecast calls for less than 1.5 inches over the area.
    Our lake water looks to be in great condition.  Water temperature is running about 46 degrees coming out of Table Rock Lake and I would expect our water to warm up with days in the 60's and 70's in our near future.  
    Because fishing has been so tough, really for most of the spring so far, there should be a build up of rainbows in the lake, especially from Branson to the dam.  There simply hasn't been the volume of trout cleaned, at least at our cleaning stations lately.
    Before the last rains, our guides and other anglers were catching a lot of rainbows on the pink Berkley's Powerworm under a float.  I saw one of them this morning fishing it in front of our dock and catching fish so I guess they're picking up where they left off.   The BPW should work - I'd use 2-pound line though - to catch more numbers of trout.
    Night crawlers are still one of the hottest baits right now.  With only 35 megawatts of power running (3,000 cfs), I'd only use a small split shot for weight, just enough to get it to the bottom.  We sell drift rigs with 1/8th-ounce bell weights... unfortunately, those are too big for the current we're seeing right now.  Just tie on a #8 hook and pinch a small shot 18 inches above the line.  Two or 4-pound would work fine.
    Don't wad the worm up on the hook... pinch the worm in half and slide the hook through the worm at the center point, letting the worm hang off both sides of the hook.  You don't have to hide the hook at all.  Inject it with air if you want but when drifting it, you really don't have to.
    Jig fishing should be very good with the water as low as it is.  Either throw a jig straight of use it under a float.  The sculpin/ginger or sculpin/peach has been the best color lately with white and white/gray a close second.  I've been throwing black and black/olive a lot with little success, which is surprising.  That was the best color this time last year.
    Fly fishing should be heating up too with the lower water.  We have seen big midge hatches the last few days and the barn swallows are back in big numbers.  You can tell when there's a hatch because the swallows are swarming all over the surface of the lake picking off bugs as they hatch off the water.  So midges - soft hackles and zebra midges should be good as well as cracklebacks.
    I'm being pretty general in my reporting because we haven't been out enough to see how the trout are reacting to this new generation pattern.  But we are looking forward to doing some more scouting very soon!
  10. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Missouri's First Lady of Trout Fishing   
    by Spence Turner ~~ "When you coming down?" Phil Lilley asked. "Browns are running and the Corps of Engineers isn't running much water through Taneycomo or for that matter anyplace in the White River system."
    Perfect conditions, I thought. We'd talked earlier about getting together Lilleys' Landing Resort for some fall trout fishing when spawning browns move up to the head-end of Lake Taneycomo. Even set a date, which turned out to be my wife's birthday...not just her birthday, but rather her 60th birthday. When she learned of my plans...well it wasn't pretty and I'm still digging out of the hole. Women just don't have sense of humor when it comes to forgetting minor things like birthdays. Needless to say, I rescheduled.
    I've conducted a 30-year, dark and steamy affair with a bewitching, curvaceous, sultry, lass, who's waters run deep and cold, followed by intensely personal periods of hot, steamy, activity. I've wallowed in those waters. Felt the power and reveled in their deep, stark, beauty; savored the explosive organisms of slashing rainbows and broad-shouldered browns; and agonized over her health as she aged.
    Her name: Lake Taneycomo, Missouri's first lady of trout fishing.
    I thought about those years, the thousands of rainbows and browns I'd handled; the fights to change regulations, introduce brown trout in 1980s and a special management zone in the 90s; as I motored south to Branson and Lilleys' Landing. The changes worked: Lake Taneycomo is back with an attitude. And, I retired.
    Taneycomo anglers have shattered Missouri's brown trout record, and discovered a dead brown, longer than the current world record. The lake has everything needed to grow a new world record: an abundance of food; great living conditions and habitat for brown trout; and regulations allowing browns to grow large. Keep your fingers crossed.
    Day One
    I wasn't looking for a record, just a couple days of great trout fishing. The water was off and after a quick check in, I headed for the upper end at Shepherd of the Hills Hatchery. The upper pools are waist-deep at max...bathtubs filled with large cruising browns and rainbows. Anglers lined the second hatchery outlet. Not really needing company, I walked to the third outlet and waded across to the Rerod run and pool, spooking several large trout with my clumsy wading.
    At the head-end of the riffle, a pod of small rainbows fed on amphipods kicked loose by upstream anglers. I caught two, before wading to the end of the run and rerigging to a large black woolly bugger as light failed. As I finished, the horn at the dam blew, chasing me off the water, as needs for electrical generation took precedence over those of the angler.
    I waited out the flush of water and resumed fishing as water fell an hour later. Fog tentacles swirled around me as I waded back out to the riffle. A great blue heron joined me fishing the shallows.
    Tensions of the day and week disappeared in the darkness and fog. Two small rainbows fell to the black woolly bugger in the dark, before a heavy strike jarred my rod. The trout wallowed briefly, shaking its head, then sprinted downstream stripping line from my reel. What a satisfying sound in the darkness.
    It wasn't large. I quickly worked the trout back, and landed and released a 15-inch brown, none the worse for our brief encounter. It was enough for the first day.
    Day Two
    The water was off. Fall leaves floated randomly around Lilleys' Landing dock, and the bluff across the lake was on fire, cloaked in reds, yellows and greens as trees held tightly to a calliope of leaves, heralding the approaching winter.
    As long as the water was off, Phil suggested fishing the upper end again. We found the parking lot full, most anglers fishing outlet 2. Phil suggested rerigging for some "skinny water" trout fishing...changing leaders from the rope I used in the darkness, to a 9-foot nymph leader, tapering to 7X or 8X. In the shallows, browns and rainbows fed on midges and amphipods, backs and tails out of the water; several large browns tended a newly dug redd in the outlet plume, mostly ignored by float-and-jerk anglers.
    We both caught trout, rainbows mostly, with a brown trout or two thrown in for good measure; Phil caught and landed 10 trout for everyone I caught. In the afternoon facing rain, we motored up to the "Overlook Hole," and fished drys and small soft hackles to rainbows cruising the shallows, finishing the day using the old tried-and-true, weighted scuds under a small strike indicator, a technique dating to the 60s and 70s. No large trout, but lots of intermediate-size rainbows fell to the rig, and we had the lake to ourselves.
    Day Three
    Ryan Walker, White River guide and friend of Phil's suggested heading for the Norfork tailwater and fishing Arkansas' catch and release zone, downstream from McClellans boat dock. Ryan is one of the new breed of White River guides, who specialize in catching large trout using flies and artificial lures (Contact Ryan through Lilleys' Landing). I'd not fished the Norfork in over 15 years and jumped at the opportunity.
    We found the river almost dead low and dropping, creating a series of shallow riffles, bedrock shelves, and pools, making the entire river available to anglers. We waded down to the first riffle and Ryan suggested fishing the skinny water, shallow areas at the edge of runs, before moving to the deeper areas in the riffle.
    "On falling water, I've found large trout holding and feeding in shallow riffle areas, overlooked by most anglers." Ryan instructed as he pointed to a spot about 5 yards from where we stood. "You'll need an indicator."
    I tied on a small "dead shrimp" Ryan handed me and cast...it really wasn't a cast. I just flipped the fly and indicator to the spot where Ryan pointed. The indicator stopped and I tightened the line and was fast into my first trout, a rainbow. In the next four casts, I caught and released three trout, all between 10 and 14 inches. Nice start to the day.
    We caught a bunch of rainbows, several browns, a couple of cutthroats and even a brook trout before breaking at noon. I'd guess we caught and released 30 to 40 trout and the day was young.
    After a drink, we drove to the handicap parking lot at Goat's Bluff and walked upstream to the islands and the end of the catch and release area. What an afternoon. I watched brown trout spawn; a young women hook a huge trout briefly before losing the fish; Ryan landing an 18-inch rainbow, which weighed in at about 4.5 pounds and lose another larger trout, which took off for Missouri and didn't stop; and Phil catching an Arkansas grand slam, a rainbow, brown, brook and cutthroat trout. The largest fish of the day for me...a large sucker. I have no idea how many trout we caught and released, probably well over 100 in the five hours we fished...certainly well worth the drive from Branson.
    Lake Taneycomo is back; heck the whole White River system is reveling in unprecedented high quality trout fishing never experienced before. Thirty years ago I envisioned what the White River System could become, and now have seen the vision come to reality. The real winner in all of this is the trout angler. The good old days are now, with more to come.
    And my love affair with Lake Taneycomo continues. Not older, just better.
  11. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tho1mas for a article, Yellow Perch State Record - 2010   
    Phil Lilley, ozarkanglers.com exclusive
    Vince Elfrink of Branson has a new personal best. And it just so happens it's a Missouri best, too!
    Elfrink, fieldhouse supervisor at College of the Ozarks, loves to fish -- and hunt-- for that matter. A native of southeast Missouri, he came to the tri-lakes area in the late 1970s to attend College of the Ozarks and there he has stayed and made the lakes area home with his wife, JoBeth, and their three children, Joel, Micah and Luke. Despite his faithfulness to his job and his family, Elfrink takes advantage of every opportunity to either be in the field or on the water.
    Three years ago he furthered his love for fishing and bought a bass boat and acquired his OUVP Coast Guard License and now moonlights as a part-time fishing guide.
    This past Sunday, he left church and headed straight to the bank on upper Bull Shoals. He was in search of the white bass and walleye that have been running the last few weeks. Armed with spinning rod, swimming minnows and his hand-tied buck tail jigs, he sprawled down the mud bank to the water to start his "restful" afternoon of fishing. It turned into a bit of a circus though.
    Hooking and landing a few decent white bass on his quarter-ounce white buck tail jig, he hooked another one – or so he thought. This fish fought about the same, but when it broke the water's surface, it had a different shape and color. It was a yellow perch.

    Yellow perch are not native to this part of the country. They normally are found farther north and are found primarily in the Great Lakes. But somehow they've found their way into Bull Shoals, much to the chagrin of the Missouri Department of Conservation. In another words, they were not stocked by MDC officials but rather by a third party -- without permission. But they've flourished and are now listed as an official game fish, at least on the record books.
    This yellow perch was a nice one. Elfrink knew he had something special. He made a call and found out the current state record was one pound, seven ounces. He thought his perch was bigger -- and he was right.
    He contacted the local MDC agent, Buck Nofsinger who asked him to bring the fish up to the local Country Mart in Forsyth to be officially weighed and verified. He weighed in at a whopping 1 pound, 11 ounces, several ounces bigger than the record.
    Vince Elfrink is now the Missouri state record holder for a yellow perch. The fish was picked up by officials from Bass Pro Shops. They will hold the perch in quarantine for 30 days and if it lives, it will be placed in their tank at Bass Pro on the Branson Landing.
  12. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tho1mas for a article, Line Class Record, Brad Wright's Story   
    Brad Wright was experimenting and tied a jig the night before the big day. Knowing that the trout bit on cracklebacks and woolys, he thought a small jig made with both a tail as well as hackle palmered on the body would work.
    It was a rainy, foggy 40-degree Wednesday morning with winds blowing out of the northeast and no water running. He started about 7:20 in the morning by outlet #1 with a rapala. “I jerked and twitched, jerked and twitched, and nothing ever bit,” he said. He switched to the jig and float. First he tried the jig with six-pound line on his spinning rod, then switched to four-pound spool with two-pound tippet tied past the indicator. On the first cast he caught a rainbow, about 18 inches long; consecutive casts yielded another rainbow and then two or three browns, approximately three pounds. He then re-tied his knot to the jig and continued casting. On the second or third cast, the big bruiser hit, taking off downstream. As Brad followed, he slipped and fell onto a big rock. “I lost my footing and my right elbow hit on the rock – but I didn’t drop my rod.,” Wright recalled.

    The fish continued its run, and headed right in front of a man from Kansas. As Wright was regaining his balance and in pursuit, the other angler called out,”Son, do you know how big this fish is?” About 10 pounds, Wright ventured. “Try doubling that,” the man replied.
    The race was on. After a joint downstream, the fish led him back upstream past outlet #2 and to the far side of the lake. Before catching up with him, Brad managed to fall several more times in his pursuit. He and the fish were all the way past the cable when the horn blew, warning that generation was starting. Once the whistle blew, to Brad’s surprise, the fish headed back downstream. Wright knew he had to get back to the hatchery side of the lake and at that time the fish had reeled off over 80 yards of line. As the water level rose, he started across, bobbing up and down trying to keep his feet beneath him.

    Suddenly the big brown made a beeline for a log just below the first outlet and stopped. At that point, Wright and the onlookers who had been witnessing the chase for and hour and a half, gathered around. Brad wanted to see where the jig was hooked now that the brown was resting. Positioning himself over the fish, he put his hand into its mouth; he could see the jig was caught between two front teeth. Later he surmised if the jig was anywhere else the 2-pound line surely would have been cut. With his other hand he grabbed a gill plate and slung the huge brown onto dry ground.
    Brad took the brown trout up to Angler’s Archery for Chuck to inspect. Unofficially it weighed over 26 pounds. Chuck, after looking up the current world record for 2-pound line, told Brad he needed to take it and get it officially weighed so off they went to Consumers grocery to be weighed on one of their meat scales. By the time it was weighed on the Consumers grocery store official scales, two hours had elapsed. Wright figures the fish probably actually weighed about 30 pounds right out of the water.
    After it was all said and done, Brad’s brown trout is in the record books as the biggest, recorded fish caught on 2-pound line in the world. The fish was mounted and now is on display at Bass Pro Shop in Springfield, Missouri.
  13. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Ham for a article, Line Class Record, Brad Wright's Story   
    Brad Wright was experimenting and tied a jig the night before the big day. Knowing that the trout bit on cracklebacks and woolys, he thought a small jig made with both a tail as well as hackle palmered on the body would work.
    It was a rainy, foggy 40-degree Wednesday morning with winds blowing out of the northeast and no water running. He started about 7:20 in the morning by outlet #1 with a rapala. “I jerked and twitched, jerked and twitched, and nothing ever bit,” he said. He switched to the jig and float. First he tried the jig with six-pound line on his spinning rod, then switched to four-pound spool with two-pound tippet tied past the indicator. On the first cast he caught a rainbow, about 18 inches long; consecutive casts yielded another rainbow and then two or three browns, approximately three pounds. He then re-tied his knot to the jig and continued casting. On the second or third cast, the big bruiser hit, taking off downstream. As Brad followed, he slipped and fell onto a big rock. “I lost my footing and my right elbow hit on the rock – but I didn’t drop my rod.,” Wright recalled.

    The fish continued its run, and headed right in front of a man from Kansas. As Wright was regaining his balance and in pursuit, the other angler called out,”Son, do you know how big this fish is?” About 10 pounds, Wright ventured. “Try doubling that,” the man replied.
    The race was on. After a joint downstream, the fish led him back upstream past outlet #2 and to the far side of the lake. Before catching up with him, Brad managed to fall several more times in his pursuit. He and the fish were all the way past the cable when the horn blew, warning that generation was starting. Once the whistle blew, to Brad’s surprise, the fish headed back downstream. Wright knew he had to get back to the hatchery side of the lake and at that time the fish had reeled off over 80 yards of line. As the water level rose, he started across, bobbing up and down trying to keep his feet beneath him.

    Suddenly the big brown made a beeline for a log just below the first outlet and stopped. At that point, Wright and the onlookers who had been witnessing the chase for and hour and a half, gathered around. Brad wanted to see where the jig was hooked now that the brown was resting. Positioning himself over the fish, he put his hand into its mouth; he could see the jig was caught between two front teeth. Later he surmised if the jig was anywhere else the 2-pound line surely would have been cut. With his other hand he grabbed a gill plate and slung the huge brown onto dry ground.
    Brad took the brown trout up to Angler’s Archery for Chuck to inspect. Unofficially it weighed over 26 pounds. Chuck, after looking up the current world record for 2-pound line, told Brad he needed to take it and get it officially weighed so off they went to Consumers grocery to be weighed on one of their meat scales. By the time it was weighed on the Consumers grocery store official scales, two hours had elapsed. Wright figures the fish probably actually weighed about 30 pounds right out of the water.
    After it was all said and done, Brad’s brown trout is in the record books as the biggest, recorded fish caught on 2-pound line in the world. The fish was mounted and now is on display at Bass Pro Shop in Springfield, Missouri.
  14. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from cheesemaster for a article, 11-YEAR OLD ANGLER CATCHES STATE-RECORD AND POSSIBLY WORLD-RECORD RIVER REDHORSE   
    DIXON, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports that 11-year old Maverick Yoakum of Dixon became the most recent record-breaking angler in Missouri when he hooked a river redhorse on Tavern Creek using a rod and reel.
    The new “pole and line” record river redhorse caught by Yoakum on March 4 weighed 10-pounds, 3-ounces. The new record breaks the previous state-record and world record pole-and-line river redhorse of 9-pound, 13-ounces caught at Tavern Creek in 2016. Yoakum was using worms when he caught the fish. MDC staff verified the record-weight fish using a certified scale in Brinktown.
    <Read More>
  15. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from laker67 for a article, Line Class Record, Brad Wright's Story   
    Brad Wright was experimenting and tied a jig the night before the big day. Knowing that the trout bit on cracklebacks and woolys, he thought a small jig made with both a tail as well as hackle palmered on the body would work.
    It was a rainy, foggy 40-degree Wednesday morning with winds blowing out of the northeast and no water running. He started about 7:20 in the morning by outlet #1 with a rapala. “I jerked and twitched, jerked and twitched, and nothing ever bit,” he said. He switched to the jig and float. First he tried the jig with six-pound line on his spinning rod, then switched to four-pound spool with two-pound tippet tied past the indicator. On the first cast he caught a rainbow, about 18 inches long; consecutive casts yielded another rainbow and then two or three browns, approximately three pounds. He then re-tied his knot to the jig and continued casting. On the second or third cast, the big bruiser hit, taking off downstream. As Brad followed, he slipped and fell onto a big rock. “I lost my footing and my right elbow hit on the rock – but I didn’t drop my rod.,” Wright recalled.

    The fish continued its run, and headed right in front of a man from Kansas. As Wright was regaining his balance and in pursuit, the other angler called out,”Son, do you know how big this fish is?” About 10 pounds, Wright ventured. “Try doubling that,” the man replied.
    The race was on. After a joint downstream, the fish led him back upstream past outlet #2 and to the far side of the lake. Before catching up with him, Brad managed to fall several more times in his pursuit. He and the fish were all the way past the cable when the horn blew, warning that generation was starting. Once the whistle blew, to Brad’s surprise, the fish headed back downstream. Wright knew he had to get back to the hatchery side of the lake and at that time the fish had reeled off over 80 yards of line. As the water level rose, he started across, bobbing up and down trying to keep his feet beneath him.

    Suddenly the big brown made a beeline for a log just below the first outlet and stopped. At that point, Wright and the onlookers who had been witnessing the chase for and hour and a half, gathered around. Brad wanted to see where the jig was hooked now that the brown was resting. Positioning himself over the fish, he put his hand into its mouth; he could see the jig was caught between two front teeth. Later he surmised if the jig was anywhere else the 2-pound line surely would have been cut. With his other hand he grabbed a gill plate and slung the huge brown onto dry ground.
    Brad took the brown trout up to Angler’s Archery for Chuck to inspect. Unofficially it weighed over 26 pounds. Chuck, after looking up the current world record for 2-pound line, told Brad he needed to take it and get it officially weighed so off they went to Consumers grocery to be weighed on one of their meat scales. By the time it was weighed on the Consumers grocery store official scales, two hours had elapsed. Wright figures the fish probably actually weighed about 30 pounds right out of the water.
    After it was all said and done, Brad’s brown trout is in the record books as the biggest, recorded fish caught on 2-pound line in the world. The fish was mounted and now is on display at Bass Pro Shop in Springfield, Missouri.
  16. Thanks
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr for a article, Generation and Wade Fishing   
    Lake Taneycomo is a tailwater lake below Table Rock Lake.  Table Rock's dam releases water for two reasons -- flood control and generation of electricity.   Recreation does not figure in to the overall plan for managing water.  The U.S. Corps of Army Engineers does work with the power companies, as well as the Missouri Department of Conservation, when asked to change water flows for various, important projects.  For instance, Table Rock Dam will hold generation when work is needed to be done on the lower dam at Powersite.
    The dam's operation is in the hands of the US Army Corp of Engineers.  The entity that controls the power generation is Southwest Power Administration.
    Seasons
    There are four lakes in this White River Chain -- Beaver, Table Rock, Taneycomo and Bull Shoals.  Each one is managed to reflect the whole chain as to water storage simply because each one has different abilities to store a volume of water.  This comes in to play when heavy, seasonable rains come, normally in the spring.  That's when we may see high flows from Table Rock Dam, moving rain water down the chain of lakes to prevent flooding.
    Summer time brings hot temperatures and more demand for electricity.  This is when we may see more heavy flows at peak times of the day, when air conditioners are running at full tilt.  We also may see heavy flows after a rainy spring season, moving floods waters out of the upper lakes.
    Fall is normally the time we see low flows.  Less demand for electricity and drier skies means less generation most years.
    Winters bring cold temperatures and more demand for power.  We can see heavy generation during peak times during the mornings and less as it warms up in the afternoon.
    Flows
    702.0 feet -- 000 m.w. -- 0,000 c.f.s.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    707.0 feet -- 110 m.w. -- 8,000 c.f.s. -- 2 turbines (units)
    708.0 feet -- 125 m.w. -- 9,500 c.f.s.
    708.5 feet -- 165 m.w. -- 12,000 c.f.s. - 3 turbines (units)
    709.0 feet -- 175 m.w. -- 13,500 c.f.s.
    710.0 feet -- 200 m.w. -- 14,750 c.f.s.
    711.0 feet -- 220 m.w. -- 16,000 c.f.s. - 4 turbines (units)
    Understand that if there's a number of units running at any one time, those units may be running at less than capacity.  That's why you can't depend on flow according to the number of units reported running.  You have to read the lake level and/or and cubic feet per second flow.
    Flow vs Wading Below the Dam
    Warning!  A loud horn will sound when turbines come online.  Get out of the water immediately.  Do not wait until water is rising.
    Warning!  Water release may increase WITHOUT any sounding horn or warning!!  Be watchful, and have an exit strategy in mind.
    The following is a general depiction of flow conditions as to the availability to successfully wade from the shore below Table Rock Dam.
    702 feet -- no generation.  Wading is possible below dam.
    703.0-704.5 feet -- up to 4,000 c.f.s..  Some wading on edges, at outlets, behind island across from #2 Outlet, in front of #3 Outlet and out on gravel bar, below boat ramp and above Trophy Run there's a long chute that can be good, but be careful not to get caught on rising water back to boat ramp (on foot) and Lookout Island (boat access only).  The inside bend at the Lookout area along Pointe Royale's property (boat access only unless you have special access to the property, which is private).
    704.5-706.5 feet -- up to 7,000 c.f.s.  Wading is difficult but not impossible.   Wade at the hatchery outlets and some edges, but be careful.
    706.5 + feet -- Wading is restricted to the outlets only.  Be very careful.  Currents are strong even along the banks.
    If you're wading below the dam and hear the horn blast, move to the bank immediately. Don't cast a few more times, don't try to catch that last trout, don't hesitate and get caught in rising water. Many have done it and found themselves in a dangerous situation, having to wade across fast and rising water to dry ground. Some have not made it. Be smart and get to the bank as soon as you hear the horn.
    Call the automated service provided by the U.S.A.C.E. at 417-336-5083.  It will give you real time information as to what the lake level is (above and below the dam), how many units are running and the c.f.s. flowing at that time.
    Other useful links:
    http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/17240-quick-link-lake-levels/
    Boating up lake with different flows on Lake Taneycomo
    The #1 question we get asked when it comes to boating on Lake Taneycomo is how high up lake lake can I boat?  That all depends on how much water is running at Table Rock Dam.
    *Zero water running, lake level 701-702 feet
    If there is no water running, you're generally safe to boat up and past the mouth of Fall Creek to the Narrows.  Stay middle to bluff side to Fall Creek and middle to right side past Fall Creek.
    At the Narrows, you HAVE to be on the far left, "at the tips of the tree branches" in the channel.  I can't express enough how narrow this channel is and how shallow the right edge will be.  The gravel is generally very dark and it is hard to see the bottom there.
    If there is a boat or two fishing the Narrows, don't try to be nice and go to the right of them.  Excuse yourself and stay in the channel.  They will understand . . .  and if they don't, well, they are clueless to the lake.
    There's a tree stump on its side off the bank that marks the top of the Narrows.  From there, go to the right slightly and get away from the bluff bank a bit.  Don't ride too close to this bank because there are big trees and rocks that will get you.  Stay middle left of center all the way to Lookout Island.
    You can boat more than halfway up past the island at Lookout but that's about all.  The lake is super shallow all the way across -- there is no channel here.  I have seen boats raise their motors up and creep past this shallow area to the Trophy Run Hole, but I wouldn't advise it.  But if you do get up there, the next chute past the club house will be too narrow and too shallow to get through.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    These produce the same conditions as if the water was not running.  Not much difference in levels, just a little more current at the narrow areas.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    At the Narrows, you still should stay in the channel.  The current will be a lot faster, and it will look safe, but there's not enough water to go over the bar.  I have seen some people make it, but I sure wouldn't chance a prop by cutting through to save time.
    At Lookout Island, if you keep your boat up on plane, you can run up by the island, staying right of center.  You should be able to see the shallow flat riffling off the top of the island -- stay clear of that shallow water.  There's also a couple of big logs on the right, too, but their tops should be exposed, up out of the water.
    At this level, you can run up through the chute above Trophy Run.  Head right straight up the "V." marking the center of the channel along the right bank.  Again, don't get too close to the bank because there are a few logs and bigger rocks.  Better to stay on the left side and tip the gravel if you're going to err.
    At the ramp, you should be right of center.  Stay there until you're at the Rocking Chair access on the left bank (road/path coming down out of the trees).  At that point, you need to edge to the left and head towards the stump sticking up below the island.  Some people will stop at this point, but I would miss the stump on the right and cut it hard right toward the wooden steps on the right bank.  That's about where the channel is at Rebar.
    When you've traveled to about mid-lake, turn up towards the dam and stay mid center  all the way to the cable.  You should be clear of the boulders on each side.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    At this flow, you should be able to run over the shallow flat at the Narrows.  And you should be able to run the middle of the lake all the way to the cable below the dam.  But I would stay on plane over all the areas I've mentioned that are shallow.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    No worries at this point.  Unless you're running too close to any bank, you should be fine boating anywhere in the trophy area.
    *If there is no water running, don't assume the lake level is at "power pool" or 702 feet.  There are times, although not often, that Empire Electric draws more water out of the lake than it should.  Empire owns and operates Powersite Dam, the dam at the lower end of Taneycomo.  If  too much water is let out there, our lake level does drop to levels above Short Creek that could get you in trouble.
     
  17. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from cheesemaster for a article, Definitely not a catfish: Birthday trip yields a huge Taneycomo surprise   
    It was supposed to be a memorable trout fishing birthday trip for his brother.
    But on the last day of a cold and windy outing at Lake Taneycomo, Ken Adam is the one who got a gift he'll never forget.
    Adam, fishing Monday with brother Steve in an adjacent boat, said he was almost ready to call it a day because of the lousy weather and murky water when he flipped a white and purple McStick lure up close to a floating log.
    <READ MORE>
  18. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Johnsfolly for a article, Definitely not a catfish: Birthday trip yields a huge Taneycomo surprise   
    It was supposed to be a memorable trout fishing birthday trip for his brother.
    But on the last day of a cold and windy outing at Lake Taneycomo, Ken Adam is the one who got a gift he'll never forget.
    Adam, fishing Monday with brother Steve in an adjacent boat, said he was almost ready to call it a day because of the lousy weather and murky water when he flipped a white and purple McStick lure up close to a floating log.
    <READ MORE>
  19. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from tjm for a article, Definitely not a catfish: Birthday trip yields a huge Taneycomo surprise   
    It was supposed to be a memorable trout fishing birthday trip for his brother.
    But on the last day of a cold and windy outing at Lake Taneycomo, Ken Adam is the one who got a gift he'll never forget.
    Adam, fishing Monday with brother Steve in an adjacent boat, said he was almost ready to call it a day because of the lousy weather and murky water when he flipped a white and purple McStick lure up close to a floating log.
    <READ MORE>
  20. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from MoCarp for a article, Definitely not a catfish: Birthday trip yields a huge Taneycomo surprise   
    It was supposed to be a memorable trout fishing birthday trip for his brother.
    But on the last day of a cold and windy outing at Lake Taneycomo, Ken Adam is the one who got a gift he'll never forget.
    Adam, fishing Monday with brother Steve in an adjacent boat, said he was almost ready to call it a day because of the lousy weather and murky water when he flipped a white and purple McStick lure up close to a floating log.
    <READ MORE>
  21. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Seth for a article, Definitely not a catfish: Birthday trip yields a huge Taneycomo surprise   
    It was supposed to be a memorable trout fishing birthday trip for his brother.
    But on the last day of a cold and windy outing at Lake Taneycomo, Ken Adam is the one who got a gift he'll never forget.
    Adam, fishing Monday with brother Steve in an adjacent boat, said he was almost ready to call it a day because of the lousy weather and murky water when he flipped a white and purple McStick lure up close to a floating log.
    <READ MORE>
  22. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from trythisonemv for a article, January 25... wade below the dam   
    Did something I haven't done in a long time.  Living this close to this water and not fishing it, wading it, would be considered a sin in most fly fishermen's book but fortunately I live by another book.  It was, though, nice to see and fish again.
    Ryan Walker, a long time friend, called and asked by if I wanted to go wade fishing below the dam.  No, first he asked me what I was doing.  He caught me between projects... I said nothing.  So when he asked me to meet him at the Rebar Hole, I didn't have a good out.  Me?  An out for fishing?  In my old age, I think I'm become more of a work-a-holic than a fisherman.
    Ryan was already catching when I arrived.  We parked at the lot to the south and above Rebar.  He had one on when I dropped over the edge down to the water.  We walked on up to the area across from hatchery outlet #2.  He had on a P&P Zebra with a gray scud dropper under a float and caught 3 more rainbows before I got rigged.
    I tied on a #16 green butt soft hackle.  It's a fly tied by legend fishing guide John Berry.  He lives and guides on the White River.

    There is a pretty good current in that area now.  I was pleasantly surprised.  The last time I had fished this spot (pre 2017 flood) there was very little movement.  It has deepened too, and you reall have to watch the area around the boulders placed there by MDC to create fish habitat --  the wash around them is big and deep.
    Anyhow, rainbows like the soft hackle.  It stripped it short and fast and they hit it.  I stripped it long and slow and they hit it.  I let it just drift in the current and they hit it.  And they hit it hard!

    Ryan was hooking up on rainbows too.


    This was a male that had been working the gravel.  You can see outlet #2 in the background.
    I also tried a zebra/scud combo.  I had a #16 red Zebra tied over a #20 dark brown camel scud (Leonard Keeney ties them).  They really like the scud. 
    We worked down to the top of Rebar.  Ryan wanted to try down at Rocking Chair, and we had time before the sun dropped behind the bluff so we walked out and drove to the parking lot further down the access road.
    We opted to start at the end of the path.  I tied on a scud duo -- a #14 tan Trout Crack over a #18 gray scud and set the float deeper than I had it uplake.  The water seemed to be much deeper there and I wanted the scuds close if not on the bottom.  I caught 5 rainbows before moving down to the gravel bar.
    We ended our evening throwing soft hackles, although they would cooperate for me as much as they did Ryan.
    I don't know how many fish we caught and it doesn't matter.  We caught up on family and fishing... and talked about his work and fishing excusions.  And it was good to fish the tailwater again.  Hope I won't be the stranger any longer.

  23. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from fishinwrench for a article, January 25... wade below the dam   
    Did something I haven't done in a long time.  Living this close to this water and not fishing it, wading it, would be considered a sin in most fly fishermen's book but fortunately I live by another book.  It was, though, nice to see and fish again.
    Ryan Walker, a long time friend, called and asked by if I wanted to go wade fishing below the dam.  No, first he asked me what I was doing.  He caught me between projects... I said nothing.  So when he asked me to meet him at the Rebar Hole, I didn't have a good out.  Me?  An out for fishing?  In my old age, I think I'm become more of a work-a-holic than a fisherman.
    Ryan was already catching when I arrived.  We parked at the lot to the south and above Rebar.  He had one on when I dropped over the edge down to the water.  We walked on up to the area across from hatchery outlet #2.  He had on a P&P Zebra with a gray scud dropper under a float and caught 3 more rainbows before I got rigged.
    I tied on a #16 green butt soft hackle.  It's a fly tied by legend fishing guide John Berry.  He lives and guides on the White River.

    There is a pretty good current in that area now.  I was pleasantly surprised.  The last time I had fished this spot (pre 2017 flood) there was very little movement.  It has deepened too, and you reall have to watch the area around the boulders placed there by MDC to create fish habitat --  the wash around them is big and deep.
    Anyhow, rainbows like the soft hackle.  It stripped it short and fast and they hit it.  I stripped it long and slow and they hit it.  I let it just drift in the current and they hit it.  And they hit it hard!

    Ryan was hooking up on rainbows too.


    This was a male that had been working the gravel.  You can see outlet #2 in the background.
    I also tried a zebra/scud combo.  I had a #16 red Zebra tied over a #20 dark brown camel scud (Leonard Keeney ties them).  They really like the scud. 
    We worked down to the top of Rebar.  Ryan wanted to try down at Rocking Chair, and we had time before the sun dropped behind the bluff so we walked out and drove to the parking lot further down the access road.
    We opted to start at the end of the path.  I tied on a scud duo -- a #14 tan Trout Crack over a #18 gray scud and set the float deeper than I had it uplake.  The water seemed to be much deeper there and I wanted the scuds close if not on the bottom.  I caught 5 rainbows before moving down to the gravel bar.
    We ended our evening throwing soft hackles, although they would cooperate for me as much as they did Ryan.
    I don't know how many fish we caught and it doesn't matter.  We caught up on family and fishing... and talked about his work and fishing excusions.  And it was good to fish the tailwater again.  Hope I won't be the stranger any longer.

  24. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from cracklebak for a article, Generation and Wade Fishing   
    Lake Taneycomo is a tailwater lake below Table Rock Lake.  Table Rock's dam releases water for two reasons -- flood control and generation of electricity.   Recreation does not figure in to the overall plan for managing water.  The U.S. Corps of Army Engineers does work with the power companies, as well as the Missouri Department of Conservation, when asked to change water flows for various, important projects.  For instance, Table Rock Dam will hold generation when work is needed to be done on the lower dam at Powersite.
    The dam's operation is in the hands of the US Army Corp of Engineers.  The entity that controls the power generation is Southwest Power Administration.
    Seasons
    There are four lakes in this White River Chain -- Beaver, Table Rock, Taneycomo and Bull Shoals.  Each one is managed to reflect the whole chain as to water storage simply because each one has different abilities to store a volume of water.  This comes in to play when heavy, seasonable rains come, normally in the spring.  That's when we may see high flows from Table Rock Dam, moving rain water down the chain of lakes to prevent flooding.
    Summer time brings hot temperatures and more demand for electricity.  This is when we may see more heavy flows at peak times of the day, when air conditioners are running at full tilt.  We also may see heavy flows after a rainy spring season, moving floods waters out of the upper lakes.
    Fall is normally the time we see low flows.  Less demand for electricity and drier skies means less generation most years.
    Winters bring cold temperatures and more demand for power.  We can see heavy generation during peak times during the mornings and less as it warms up in the afternoon.
    Flows
    702.0 feet -- 000 m.w. -- 0,000 c.f.s.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    707.0 feet -- 110 m.w. -- 8,000 c.f.s. -- 2 turbines (units)
    708.0 feet -- 125 m.w. -- 9,500 c.f.s.
    708.5 feet -- 165 m.w. -- 12,000 c.f.s. - 3 turbines (units)
    709.0 feet -- 175 m.w. -- 13,500 c.f.s.
    710.0 feet -- 200 m.w. -- 14,750 c.f.s.
    711.0 feet -- 220 m.w. -- 16,000 c.f.s. - 4 turbines (units)
    Understand that if there's a number of units running at any one time, those units may be running at less than capacity.  That's why you can't depend on flow according to the number of units reported running.  You have to read the lake level and/or and cubic feet per second flow.
    Flow vs Wading Below the Dam
    Warning!  A loud horn will sound when turbines come online.  Get out of the water immediately.  Do not wait until water is rising.
    Warning!  Water release may increase WITHOUT any sounding horn or warning!!  Be watchful, and have an exit strategy in mind.
    The following is a general depiction of flow conditions as to the availability to successfully wade from the shore below Table Rock Dam.
    702 feet -- no generation.  Wading is possible below dam.
    703.0-704.5 feet -- up to 4,000 c.f.s..  Some wading on edges, at outlets, behind island across from #2 Outlet, in front of #3 Outlet and out on gravel bar, below boat ramp and above Trophy Run there's a long chute that can be good, but be careful not to get caught on rising water back to boat ramp (on foot) and Lookout Island (boat access only).  The inside bend at the Lookout area along Pointe Royale's property (boat access only unless you have special access to the property, which is private).
    704.5-706.5 feet -- up to 7,000 c.f.s.  Wading is difficult but not impossible.   Wade at the hatchery outlets and some edges, but be careful.
    706.5 + feet -- Wading is restricted to the outlets only.  Be very careful.  Currents are strong even along the banks.
    If you're wading below the dam and hear the horn blast, move to the bank immediately. Don't cast a few more times, don't try to catch that last trout, don't hesitate and get caught in rising water. Many have done it and found themselves in a dangerous situation, having to wade across fast and rising water to dry ground. Some have not made it. Be smart and get to the bank as soon as you hear the horn.
    Call the automated service provided by the U.S.A.C.E. at 417-336-5083.  It will give you real time information as to what the lake level is (above and below the dam), how many units are running and the c.f.s. flowing at that time.
    Other useful links:
    http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/17240-quick-link-lake-levels/
    Boating up lake with different flows on Lake Taneycomo
    The #1 question we get asked when it comes to boating on Lake Taneycomo is how high up lake lake can I boat?  That all depends on how much water is running at Table Rock Dam.
    *Zero water running, lake level 701-702 feet
    If there is no water running, you're generally safe to boat up and past the mouth of Fall Creek to the Narrows.  Stay middle to bluff side to Fall Creek and middle to right side past Fall Creek.
    At the Narrows, you HAVE to be on the far left, "at the tips of the tree branches" in the channel.  I can't express enough how narrow this channel is and how shallow the right edge will be.  The gravel is generally very dark and it is hard to see the bottom there.
    If there is a boat or two fishing the Narrows, don't try to be nice and go to the right of them.  Excuse yourself and stay in the channel.  They will understand . . .  and if they don't, well, they are clueless to the lake.
    There's a tree stump on its side off the bank that marks the top of the Narrows.  From there, go to the right slightly and get away from the bluff bank a bit.  Don't ride too close to this bank because there are big trees and rocks that will get you.  Stay middle left of center all the way to Lookout Island.
    You can boat more than halfway up past the island at Lookout but that's about all.  The lake is super shallow all the way across -- there is no channel here.  I have seen boats raise their motors up and creep past this shallow area to the Trophy Run Hole, but I wouldn't advise it.  But if you do get up there, the next chute past the club house will be too narrow and too shallow to get through.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    These produce the same conditions as if the water was not running.  Not much difference in levels, just a little more current at the narrow areas.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    At the Narrows, you still should stay in the channel.  The current will be a lot faster, and it will look safe, but there's not enough water to go over the bar.  I have seen some people make it, but I sure wouldn't chance a prop by cutting through to save time.
    At Lookout Island, if you keep your boat up on plane, you can run up by the island, staying right of center.  You should be able to see the shallow flat riffling off the top of the island -- stay clear of that shallow water.  There's also a couple of big logs on the right, too, but their tops should be exposed, up out of the water.
    At this level, you can run up through the chute above Trophy Run.  Head right straight up the "V." marking the center of the channel along the right bank.  Again, don't get too close to the bank because there are a few logs and bigger rocks.  Better to stay on the left side and tip the gravel if you're going to err.
    At the ramp, you should be right of center.  Stay there until you're at the Rocking Chair access on the left bank (road/path coming down out of the trees).  At that point, you need to edge to the left and head towards the stump sticking up below the island.  Some people will stop at this point, but I would miss the stump on the right and cut it hard right toward the wooden steps on the right bank.  That's about where the channel is at Rebar.
    When you've traveled to about mid-lake, turn up towards the dam and stay mid center  all the way to the cable.  You should be clear of the boulders on each side.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    At this flow, you should be able to run over the shallow flat at the Narrows.  And you should be able to run the middle of the lake all the way to the cable below the dam.  But I would stay on plane over all the areas I've mentioned that are shallow.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    No worries at this point.  Unless you're running too close to any bank, you should be fine boating anywhere in the trophy area.
    *If there is no water running, don't assume the lake level is at "power pool" or 702 feet.  There are times, although not often, that Empire Electric draws more water out of the lake than it should.  Empire owns and operates Powersite Dam, the dam at the lower end of Taneycomo.  If  too much water is let out there, our lake level does drop to levels above Short Creek that could get you in trouble.
     
  25. Like
    Phil Lilley got a reaction from Lee Stallard for a article, Generation and Wade Fishing   
    Lake Taneycomo is a tailwater lake below Table Rock Lake.  Table Rock's dam releases water for two reasons -- flood control and generation of electricity.   Recreation does not figure in to the overall plan for managing water.  The U.S. Corps of Army Engineers does work with the power companies, as well as the Missouri Department of Conservation, when asked to change water flows for various, important projects.  For instance, Table Rock Dam will hold generation when work is needed to be done on the lower dam at Powersite.
    The dam's operation is in the hands of the US Army Corp of Engineers.  The entity that controls the power generation is Southwest Power Administration.
    Seasons
    There are four lakes in this White River Chain -- Beaver, Table Rock, Taneycomo and Bull Shoals.  Each one is managed to reflect the whole chain as to water storage simply because each one has different abilities to store a volume of water.  This comes in to play when heavy, seasonable rains come, normally in the spring.  That's when we may see high flows from Table Rock Dam, moving rain water down the chain of lakes to prevent flooding.
    Summer time brings hot temperatures and more demand for electricity.  This is when we may see more heavy flows at peak times of the day, when air conditioners are running at full tilt.  We also may see heavy flows after a rainy spring season, moving floods waters out of the upper lakes.
    Fall is normally the time we see low flows.  Less demand for electricity and drier skies means less generation most years.
    Winters bring cold temperatures and more demand for power.  We can see heavy generation during peak times during the mornings and less as it warms up in the afternoon.
    Flows
    702.0 feet -- 000 m.w. -- 0,000 c.f.s.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    707.0 feet -- 110 m.w. -- 8,000 c.f.s. -- 2 turbines (units)
    708.0 feet -- 125 m.w. -- 9,500 c.f.s.
    708.5 feet -- 165 m.w. -- 12,000 c.f.s. - 3 turbines (units)
    709.0 feet -- 175 m.w. -- 13,500 c.f.s.
    710.0 feet -- 200 m.w. -- 14,750 c.f.s.
    711.0 feet -- 220 m.w. -- 16,000 c.f.s. - 4 turbines (units)
    Understand that if there's a number of units running at any one time, those units may be running at less than capacity.  That's why you can't depend on flow according to the number of units reported running.  You have to read the lake level and/or and cubic feet per second flow.
    Flow vs Wading Below the Dam
    Warning!  A loud horn will sound when turbines come online.  Get out of the water immediately.  Do not wait until water is rising.
    Warning!  Water release may increase WITHOUT any sounding horn or warning!!  Be watchful, and have an exit strategy in mind.
    The following is a general depiction of flow conditions as to the availability to successfully wade from the shore below Table Rock Dam.
    702 feet -- no generation.  Wading is possible below dam.
    703.0-704.5 feet -- up to 4,000 c.f.s..  Some wading on edges, at outlets, behind island across from #2 Outlet, in front of #3 Outlet and out on gravel bar, below boat ramp and above Trophy Run there's a long chute that can be good, but be careful not to get caught on rising water back to boat ramp (on foot) and Lookout Island (boat access only).  The inside bend at the Lookout area along Pointe Royale's property (boat access only unless you have special access to the property, which is private).
    704.5-706.5 feet -- up to 7,000 c.f.s.  Wading is difficult but not impossible.   Wade at the hatchery outlets and some edges, but be careful.
    706.5 + feet -- Wading is restricted to the outlets only.  Be very careful.  Currents are strong even along the banks.
    If you're wading below the dam and hear the horn blast, move to the bank immediately. Don't cast a few more times, don't try to catch that last trout, don't hesitate and get caught in rising water. Many have done it and found themselves in a dangerous situation, having to wade across fast and rising water to dry ground. Some have not made it. Be smart and get to the bank as soon as you hear the horn.
    Call the automated service provided by the U.S.A.C.E. at 417-336-5083.  It will give you real time information as to what the lake level is (above and below the dam), how many units are running and the c.f.s. flowing at that time.
    Other useful links:
    http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/17240-quick-link-lake-levels/
    Boating up lake with different flows on Lake Taneycomo
    The #1 question we get asked when it comes to boating on Lake Taneycomo is how high up lake lake can I boat?  That all depends on how much water is running at Table Rock Dam.
    *Zero water running, lake level 701-702 feet
    If there is no water running, you're generally safe to boat up and past the mouth of Fall Creek to the Narrows.  Stay middle to bluff side to Fall Creek and middle to right side past Fall Creek.
    At the Narrows, you HAVE to be on the far left, "at the tips of the tree branches" in the channel.  I can't express enough how narrow this channel is and how shallow the right edge will be.  The gravel is generally very dark and it is hard to see the bottom there.
    If there is a boat or two fishing the Narrows, don't try to be nice and go to the right of them.  Excuse yourself and stay in the channel.  They will understand . . .  and if they don't, well, they are clueless to the lake.
    There's a tree stump on its side off the bank that marks the top of the Narrows.  From there, go to the right slightly and get away from the bluff bank a bit.  Don't ride too close to this bank because there are big trees and rocks that will get you.  Stay middle left of center all the way to Lookout Island.
    You can boat more than halfway up past the island at Lookout but that's about all.  The lake is super shallow all the way across -- there is no channel here.  I have seen boats raise their motors up and creep past this shallow area to the Trophy Run Hole, but I wouldn't advise it.  But if you do get up there, the next chute past the club house will be too narrow and too shallow to get through.
    703.0 feet -- 010 m.w. -- < 1,000 c.f.s.
    These produce the same conditions as if the water was not running.  Not much difference in levels, just a little more current at the narrow areas.
    704.0 feet -- 035 m.w. -- 2,500 c.f.s.
    At the Narrows, you still should stay in the channel.  The current will be a lot faster, and it will look safe, but there's not enough water to go over the bar.  I have seen some people make it, but I sure wouldn't chance a prop by cutting through to save time.
    At Lookout Island, if you keep your boat up on plane, you can run up by the island, staying right of center.  You should be able to see the shallow flat riffling off the top of the island -- stay clear of that shallow water.  There's also a couple of big logs on the right, too, but their tops should be exposed, up out of the water.
    At this level, you can run up through the chute above Trophy Run.  Head right straight up the "V." marking the center of the channel along the right bank.  Again, don't get too close to the bank because there are a few logs and bigger rocks.  Better to stay on the left side and tip the gravel if you're going to err.
    At the ramp, you should be right of center.  Stay there until you're at the Rocking Chair access on the left bank (road/path coming down out of the trees).  At that point, you need to edge to the left and head towards the stump sticking up below the island.  Some people will stop at this point, but I would miss the stump on the right and cut it hard right toward the wooden steps on the right bank.  That's about where the channel is at Rebar.
    When you've traveled to about mid-lake, turn up towards the dam and stay mid center  all the way to the cable.  You should be clear of the boulders on each side.
    705.0 feet -- 055 m.w. -- 4,000 c.f.s. -- 1 turbine (unit)
    705.5 feet -- 075 m.w. -- 5,000 c.f.s.
    At this flow, you should be able to run over the shallow flat at the Narrows.  And you should be able to run the middle of the lake all the way to the cable below the dam.  But I would stay on plane over all the areas I've mentioned that are shallow.
    706.0 feet -- 085 m.w. -- 6,250 c.f.s.
    No worries at this point.  Unless you're running too close to any bank, you should be fine boating anywhere in the trophy area.
    *If there is no water running, don't assume the lake level is at "power pool" or 702 feet.  There are times, although not often, that Empire Electric draws more water out of the lake than it should.  Empire owns and operates Powersite Dam, the dam at the lower end of Taneycomo.  If  too much water is let out there, our lake level does drop to levels above Short Creek that could get you in trouble.
     
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