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creek wader

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  1. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr in Hows the Water?   
    Please give a report after your trip. I was thinking of doing that stretch, soon.
    I fished Barclay down early in the year. Water was high and swift. Couldn’t get very many casts while moving because of controlling kayak. Tried drifting over riffles but usually snagged.  Very few places to fish from bank. Still caught fish, but had to work for it. 
    Unfortunately, I don’t get to pick when I can fish, rather fish when I can. Part of fishing. Like to try the river when it’s a little tamer. Please give a post trip report.
  2. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from FishermanTodd in Frustrations   
    Live minnows can make a bad fisherman look good.
    In our world catch and release are the norm.  Unfortunately, in the rest of the world, catch and release fishermen are the minority. Many people have the “I keep everything I catch”, mentality. Found out the hard way when I let people to fish my ponds, it got pretty ugly. 
    Just wish they’d target the Asian carp instead.
  3. Like
    creek wader reacted to Dutch in Rouark 7/19/19   
    We got on the water a little after 6 and left before 12.  We caught fish on spinnerbaits, worms, swim baits, and grubs. We fished on the main lake down to Hawker.  We also fished in sons.  We caught 20 bass.  5 keeper greenies and 11 keeper spots.  No big fish but no dinks either.  Here are a couple of green fish and a nice spot.



  4. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr in Headed to chase some smallies   
    Welcome to the site. You’ve came to the right place for advice. A wealth of info from a good group of guys. 
  5. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr in Headed to chase some smallies   
    I used Mountan Creek for shuttle. I had a good day. Not a great day. Caught around 25 smallies. Several  nice goggle eye and a nice rainbow. Most smallies were less than 12”. Biggest smallie of the day was a 17”. 
    Im not used to fishing a stream with such a fast flow. Shot right by a lot of spots without getting a cast. When I tried to cast while moving, I snagged a lot. Lost a lot off tackle. So I switched to weightless soft plastics. Neds, flukes, swim baits, and senkos. Started catching fish, then.

  6. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from FishermanTodd in Headed to chase some smallies   
    I used Mountan Creek for shuttle. I had a good day. Not a great day. Caught around 25 smallies. Several  nice goggle eye and a nice rainbow. Most smallies were less than 12”. Biggest smallie of the day was a 17”. 
    Im not used to fishing a stream with such a fast flow. Shot right by a lot of spots without getting a cast. When I tried to cast while moving, I snagged a lot. Lost a lot off tackle. So I switched to weightless soft plastics. Neds, flukes, swim baits, and senkos. Started catching fish, then.

  7. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from BilletHead in Headed to chase some smallies   
    I used Mountan Creek for shuttle. I had a good day. Not a great day. Caught around 25 smallies. Several  nice goggle eye and a nice rainbow. Most smallies were less than 12”. Biggest smallie of the day was a 17”. 
    Im not used to fishing a stream with such a fast flow. Shot right by a lot of spots without getting a cast. When I tried to cast while moving, I snagged a lot. Lost a lot off tackle. So I switched to weightless soft plastics. Neds, flukes, swim baits, and senkos. Started catching fish, then.

  8. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Johnsfolly in Headed to chase some smallies   
    I used Mountan Creek for shuttle. I had a good day. Not a great day. Caught around 25 smallies. Several  nice goggle eye and a nice rainbow. Most smallies were less than 12”. Biggest smallie of the day was a 17”. 
    Im not used to fishing a stream with such a fast flow. Shot right by a lot of spots without getting a cast. When I tried to cast while moving, I snagged a lot. Lost a lot off tackle. So I switched to weightless soft plastics. Neds, flukes, swim baits, and senkos. Started catching fish, then.

  9. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from MOstreamer in Headed to chase some smallies   
    I’m heading down tomorrow morning early.  Gonna try Barkley down to Mountain Creek. It’s roughly a 4 hour drive each way. So that cuts into my fishing big time. 
    if I have any success at all I’m going to try a 2 or 3 day float to Lead mine, later in the year. 
  10. Like
    creek wader reacted to fishinwrench in Headed to chase some smallies   
    Hands down best Smallie finder ever.....
     
    on 8# flourocarbon.   
  11. Like
    creek wader reacted to TroutRinger in Headed to chase some smallies   
    Strike King Bitsy Tubes...is that what you’re using? I’ve caught 80% of my smallmouth on those. I shove 1/8 oz crappie jigs up the them for the hook. Various topwater baits are effective. I have had good success recently on the whopper plopper 90 and torpedos. Walk the dog lures are popular too. 
    I pretty pretty much have those two tied on at all times. I usually have three rods. The third rod has a HD craw, Bomber Model A real craw, jig and pig, or Ned rig. 
    A lot of people only fish the really obvious spots on a river. You know, the ones that look like they just hold fish. Don’t overlook other areas.
    -Push water: the area above a rapid where the water kind of pushes/rises before going over the rocks.
    -Shallow areas with current that are off the main channel: a lot of people I fish with will be casting into the deep area in the current. There are definitely fish there. If I see current moving on the other/shallow side, especially if there is a lot of low hanging limbs from the bank, I cast there and almost always catch more fish. 
  12. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from FishermanTodd in Headed to chase some smallies   
    Okay. I was researching. That looks like a good place to put in. Thanks for your help. Now it’s up to the weather. 
  13. Like
    creek wader reacted to Al Agnew in Usgs Water Level   
    The river level graph on the gage site is useless unless you already know what level is normal and what is too high. But the flow in cfs graph is the one you should be using, along with the table that has the heading "daily discharge statistics, in cfs...". With it, you can get a pretty good idea of what the river is doing and what is floatable and fishable. Here's how:

    On the graph, you'll see those little triangles. Those signify the median flow for each day, based upon all the years of record for that gage. That's the figure that means that 50% of the time the river was lower than that on the given day, 50% it was higher. It's a pretty good approximation of the "normal" flow for that day. If the river level is pretty close to those triangles, the river is pretty close to normal.

    Now look at the table. On it you'll see the "most recent instantaneous value", which is what the river is flowing right then (within an hour or two). You'll also see the "median", which is the flow that corresponds to the little triangle for the day on the graph. That's the "normal" flow. And you'll also see, along with some other figures, the "80th percentile" figure. The river has flowed less than that figure on the given day 80% of the years of record. It's actually a decent approximation of the high end of floatable and fishable flow.

    So, today (April 18th) the Big Piney near Big Piney, MO was flowing 686 cfs. Median flow for today is 575 cfs, so the river is somewhat above normal. But the 80th percentile figure is 1340 cfs. So the river is well below that figure, and much closer to the median. So...it's slightly above normal but not enough above normal to be significant. If it was flowing, say, 1200 cfs, it would be getting a little marginal, and if it was flowing 1500 cfs it would almost certainly be too high.

    Another thing to note...in the fishing report that somebody gave for April 15-16, the river was obviously floatable and fishable. Looking at the graph, you'll see that the river was dropping from about 1000 cfs at the beginning of the 15th to 800 cfs at the end of the 16th. So that also tells you that the river is very floatable and fishable at 1000 cfs. You can also start to get an idea of how river level corresponds to flow by comparing the two graphs. It was dropping from about 4.5 to about 4.25 during that time. So now you know that it's floatable and fishable at 4.5 in mid-April. Early May shouldn't be considerably different than that.

    So, I'm guessing that as long as the river level is no more than 4.75 you should be good. 5 would be getting iffy. Of course, you also have to look at what the river has been doing in the last few days. A reading of 4.75 that's in the middle of a drop from a much higher level could still mean muddy water. A reading of that when it's still going up could mean the same or worse. But a reading of 4.75 when it's starting to drop after a slightly higher rise would be more likely to be okay.
  14. Like
    creek wader reacted to Al Agnew in Winter Time Planning   
    Treehouse was really a character.  One time a buddy and I were going to float the entire Courtois Creek from up at Cub Creek down to Scotia, where Treehouse lived and had his canoe rental.  We drove into the area the night before, planning on seeing if Treehouse would shuttle us the next morning, but we were going to spend the night at an MDC campground across the creek from Treehouse's place and up the road a ways.  Just before dark, here came Treehouse in his old beat up truck into the campground.  We were the only ones there, since it was the middle of the week.  He told us the weather forecast was for big storms, and it wasn't a good idea to stay in that campground, since the little creek flowing through it was prone to flooding and we might be stuck in there half the next day.  He said, "Why don't you men come and stay in my campground.  Ain't nobody there now and I won't even charge you."
    So we did, and he must have wanted somebody to talk to, because as soon as we set up camp, he came down with a big cooler full of beer and told us stories half the night...and wiped out the whole cooler of beer.
  15. Like
  16. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from MoCarp in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Trout aren't native to Missouri or Arkansas. So, I guess if bad farming and manufacturing practices create poor water quality and the elimination of trout in Missouri. By your logic, that's ok because there not native, anyway. 
  17. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from MoCarp in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Fishinwrech, I really don't know the answer about the melting, either. I assume it's the ocean temperature that's warming. And it's melting the outer edges of the icecap. Just a guess. 
    On the "on the edge post". Trying to keep this an environmental issue. Not a religious issue. We don't really know what God's plan is.
    One way at looking at it is: God created man, so anything man does is in his plan. Good and bad. Including the holocost, genocide, clearing the rainforest, acid rain, fracking causing thousands of earthquakes, testing nuclear weapons, pollution in all forms, etc. That man is a tool or means of carrying out God's plan.
    Or, the other way of looking at it is; God gave man a brain with the power to reason/think. God made a planet that is suitable to sustain life for man. Fresh air, clean water, food, temperature, etc. When you look at the atmosphere and extreme temperatures on other planets, this is the only planet that man can survive on, that we know of. We have such a small window of temperature extremes and air mix that we can survive in. That God trusts man to take care of the planet and to make it a livable environment at the very minimum. Since we live here and have more impact on the planet than any other living organisms. Then we are basically the stewards of this planet and for generations to come. So, man needs to take it very seriously. Something that hits close to home are the quality of the Ozark streams. Some may take it for granite. Where I live, the rivers are muddy, farmers have taken out many of the riparian corridors and stream bank erosion is quite bad. Loss of habitat do to farming every square inch, has decimated the quail and pheasant habitat to mention just a few. Growing up in Nebraska, pheasant was king. You would see hundreds if not thousands of birds in a year. Now, seeing a pheasant is a very rare thing. Man altered that.
    I believe that humans have the power to make this planet what we want it to be. If man can create earthquakes, many earthquakes, I think we can do other major environmental disasters. Key to everything is moderation and learn from our mistakes and don't repeat them. 
    Just my 2 cents, again 
     
  18. Like
    creek wader reacted to Kayser in Lake Michigan   
    It's still very, very cold, but I managed to get a fish from the big water last week. Water looked chalky blue-white, and I threw a jerkbait around some industrial rip rap. I would guess 16" or so on the fish.
    It had been a very long winter for me until this point.

  19. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from mixermarkb in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    "scientist" cooking the books for decades to fit their agenda. 
    Seriously? Do you actually believe that statement? At what benefit? Did they all the scientists in the world get together 20 or 30 years ago, and hold a pow wow? Producing a plan, better yet a vast conspiracy to lie to the world. Why? At what gain?
    I guess people can believe that the earth is flat, that's your right.
  20. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Bass Yakker in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Your correct. Guess they don't belong here anyway, kind of like the buffalo. Oops sorry, they may have been native.
  21. Like
    creek wader reacted to jackdizo in Smallmouth Hunting with Streamers...   
    Got out earlier in the week since the forecast was calling for lots of rain, and the streams were most likely going to get blown out. Hit up my favorite creek to test out some new streamers I tied in search of some Spring Small Jaws. I was not disappointed. They were caught deep and shallow in slower water, most fish were fat and seemed to be pre-spawn, however I did stumble across some on beds, and let them do their thing. Here are a few better ones from earlier in the week and a couple from a few weeks back. Things are only going to get better here soon with Summer on its way! Tight lines.




  22. Like
    creek wader reacted to ozark trout fisher in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Yep, you can only blame so much of it on development. That may be relevant in parts of the Meramec watershed, for sure, but I'm pretty certain that's  not a primary cause of these "super-floods" on the Jacks Fork and the Current. Or the North Fork/Eleven Point/Black.
    Heck, back in the "day" landowners were on the regular burning half the watershed each spring. They were clearing land at a much higher rate than now for beyond marginal ag-land. That situation has mostly improved in the region, although of course there is some work to do. But it's not why we're all of a sudden having huge floods seemingly every year.
    The truth is we know why these kinds of floods are happening. As Al says, we can either accept progressive (not progressive in the political sense but as in "it's only gonna get worse") climate change as the primary explanatory variable and start planning accordingly ...or we can pretend it's just a blip on the radar screen, and continue to suffer more and more dire consequences. 
  23. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Mark in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Fishinwrech, I really don't know the answer about the melting, either. I assume it's the ocean temperature that's warming. And it's melting the outer edges of the icecap. Just a guess. 
    On the "on the edge post". Trying to keep this an environmental issue. Not a religious issue. We don't really know what God's plan is.
    One way at looking at it is: God created man, so anything man does is in his plan. Good and bad. Including the holocost, genocide, clearing the rainforest, acid rain, fracking causing thousands of earthquakes, testing nuclear weapons, pollution in all forms, etc. That man is a tool or means of carrying out God's plan.
    Or, the other way of looking at it is; God gave man a brain with the power to reason/think. God made a planet that is suitable to sustain life for man. Fresh air, clean water, food, temperature, etc. When you look at the atmosphere and extreme temperatures on other planets, this is the only planet that man can survive on, that we know of. We have such a small window of temperature extremes and air mix that we can survive in. That God trusts man to take care of the planet and to make it a livable environment at the very minimum. Since we live here and have more impact on the planet than any other living organisms. Then we are basically the stewards of this planet and for generations to come. So, man needs to take it very seriously. Something that hits close to home are the quality of the Ozark streams. Some may take it for granite. Where I live, the rivers are muddy, farmers have taken out many of the riparian corridors and stream bank erosion is quite bad. Loss of habitat do to farming every square inch, has decimated the quail and pheasant habitat to mention just a few. Growing up in Nebraska, pheasant was king. You would see hundreds if not thousands of birds in a year. Now, seeing a pheasant is a very rare thing. Man altered that.
    I believe that humans have the power to make this planet what we want it to be. If man can create earthquakes, many earthquakes, I think we can do other major environmental disasters. Key to everything is moderation and learn from our mistakes and don't repeat them. 
    Just my 2 cents, again 
     
  24. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from Daryk Campbell Sr in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Fishinwrech, I really don't know the answer about the melting, either. I assume it's the ocean temperature that's warming. And it's melting the outer edges of the icecap. Just a guess. 
    On the "on the edge post". Trying to keep this an environmental issue. Not a religious issue. We don't really know what God's plan is.
    One way at looking at it is: God created man, so anything man does is in his plan. Good and bad. Including the holocost, genocide, clearing the rainforest, acid rain, fracking causing thousands of earthquakes, testing nuclear weapons, pollution in all forms, etc. That man is a tool or means of carrying out God's plan.
    Or, the other way of looking at it is; God gave man a brain with the power to reason/think. God made a planet that is suitable to sustain life for man. Fresh air, clean water, food, temperature, etc. When you look at the atmosphere and extreme temperatures on other planets, this is the only planet that man can survive on, that we know of. We have such a small window of temperature extremes and air mix that we can survive in. That God trusts man to take care of the planet and to make it a livable environment at the very minimum. Since we live here and have more impact on the planet than any other living organisms. Then we are basically the stewards of this planet and for generations to come. So, man needs to take it very seriously. Something that hits close to home are the quality of the Ozark streams. Some may take it for granite. Where I live, the rivers are muddy, farmers have taken out many of the riparian corridors and stream bank erosion is quite bad. Loss of habitat do to farming every square inch, has decimated the quail and pheasant habitat to mention just a few. Growing up in Nebraska, pheasant was king. You would see hundreds if not thousands of birds in a year. Now, seeing a pheasant is a very rare thing. Man altered that.
    I believe that humans have the power to make this planet what we want it to be. If man can create earthquakes, many earthquakes, I think we can do other major environmental disasters. Key to everything is moderation and learn from our mistakes and don't repeat them. 
    Just my 2 cents, again 
     
  25. Like
    creek wader got a reaction from fishinwrench in Some amazing preliminary observations of the flood records   
    Fishinwrech, I really don't know the answer about the melting, either. I assume it's the ocean temperature that's warming. And it's melting the outer edges of the icecap. Just a guess. 
    On the "on the edge post". Trying to keep this an environmental issue. Not a religious issue. We don't really know what God's plan is.
    One way at looking at it is: God created man, so anything man does is in his plan. Good and bad. Including the holocost, genocide, clearing the rainforest, acid rain, fracking causing thousands of earthquakes, testing nuclear weapons, pollution in all forms, etc. That man is a tool or means of carrying out God's plan.
    Or, the other way of looking at it is; God gave man a brain with the power to reason/think. God made a planet that is suitable to sustain life for man. Fresh air, clean water, food, temperature, etc. When you look at the atmosphere and extreme temperatures on other planets, this is the only planet that man can survive on, that we know of. We have such a small window of temperature extremes and air mix that we can survive in. That God trusts man to take care of the planet and to make it a livable environment at the very minimum. Since we live here and have more impact on the planet than any other living organisms. Then we are basically the stewards of this planet and for generations to come. So, man needs to take it very seriously. Something that hits close to home are the quality of the Ozark streams. Some may take it for granite. Where I live, the rivers are muddy, farmers have taken out many of the riparian corridors and stream bank erosion is quite bad. Loss of habitat do to farming every square inch, has decimated the quail and pheasant habitat to mention just a few. Growing up in Nebraska, pheasant was king. You would see hundreds if not thousands of birds in a year. Now, seeing a pheasant is a very rare thing. Man altered that.
    I believe that humans have the power to make this planet what we want it to be. If man can create earthquakes, many earthquakes, I think we can do other major environmental disasters. Key to everything is moderation and learn from our mistakes and don't repeat them. 
    Just my 2 cents, again 
     
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