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Brian Jones

Fishing Buddy
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About Brian Jones

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    Grass Pickerel

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bonne Terre, MO
  • Interests
    river fishing, and deer hunting

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  1. I can only speak of the Invitational and I've been hit or miss for the past 10 or so years so I cannot speak for every tournament. But I can tell you this, when cwc87 was helping run the weigh ins NOT ONE spotted bass brought to the scales was returned to the river. I've always respected him for that.
  2. I know that by the mid 90's they had already made it into Apple and Saline Creeks. However, no one in a position of importance gave a darn until they began to threaten Lake Michigan almst a decade later...... Would a more proactive approach (if one was even possible) to this problem made a difference? Who knows. But the one thing for certain is that ignoring the problem did absolutely nothing except bolster the population.
  3. They're above Jerome.........
  4. I guess I would say I'm more of a dabbler as I've only floated one creek from start to finish, but here is my list. Big River: Belgrade to Mammoth in the canoe. Mammoth to about 4 miles below Brown's Ford in the jet boat. And then a little bit of river above Morse Mill and above Rockford Beach in the jet boat as well. Mineral Fork: Hwy F to Big River confluence. Would like to explore above F sometime... Cedar Creek: Hwy 32 to Big River; in the canoe obviously.. Meramec: Scott's Ford to Garrison's in the canoe. Garrison's to Big River confluence in the jet boat. Huzzah: Some put in above Hwy 8 that Huzzah Valley uses to put floaters in down to the confluence with the Meramec St. Francis: A float on the upper, upper river in "Sims Mountain/Manion" country, then from Cedar Bottom to Coldwater in the canoe. Also, Greenville to about two miles above Bounds Creek in the jet boat. Little St. Francis: A short float in the middle section of this creek; in the canoe. Gasconade: From about 3 miles above Riddle Bridge down to Second Creek/Helds Island; all in the jet boat. Big Piney: Mason Bridge to Slabtown in the canoe, then from the Gasconade up to the first railroad bridge in the jet boat. Osage: Bagnell to Wardsville and from Mari-Osa up to the old lock and dam; all in the jet boat. James: Hootentown to Galena, both in the jet boat and canoe. Cape Fair up to a rock ledge. We were to scared to run through it in the jet boat. I guess we went past Blunk's. Beaver Creek: Can't remember exactly as it was a one time trip and it was too many years ago. But it was about a 5 mile float that didn't leave much of an impression......
  5. I wish the mdc would do away with the public comment periods as well as the open houses they have any time there is a regulation change. Because in the end they're going to do whatever they wanted to do to begin with...... they actually concluded from an on line survey that extending the season would not harm non target species? Where is the science behind that? I guess they are now considering game fish target species? Hopefully we'll have another winter of high water.....
  6. If you put your raft in Big River at St. Francois State Park and head down river, you WILL NOT float a circle back to the park......It isn't a lazy river like at Six Flags..... I always thought that this was common knowledge. But once again I've been proven wrong...........
  7. Strictly my opinion but: 1. Osage below bagnell 2. Black river below Clearwater 3. (tie) lower meramec as in below mouth of bourbeuse 3. (Tie) middle big river (like the stretch from around Desloge to Washington state park. Seems like this stretch has been producing at least one 18-19 inch spot a summer over the past 4-5 summers.
  8. Not to derail the thread, but what does that mean exactly?? Always heard the term, along with keeping up with the Joneses, but never really understood what they meant............😋...........
  9. Put one of these in my boat when I put it together in 2015. No complaints https://trouttandsons.com/wp/2018/07/12/way-panel-switch-3-way-pnmep0216/ https://trouttandsons.com/wp/2018/07/12/4-way-panel-switch-2-4-way-pnmep0218/
  10. If not spoken for by lipripper I'll take them.
  11. I have several memories from that summer. My favorite. We were coming back from St. Louis one afternoon and as we neared Arnold traffic on 55 south was backed up in all lanes and moving at a snail's pace. As we crawled along, a blazer full of teenagers with what appeared to be a new driver comes barreling down the shoulder honking, screaming obscenities and gesturing to everyone they passed. About a half hour later, as we neared Richardson Road, the blazer had been cut off by a very frustrated carpenter (white pants) who apparently had exhausted all of his patience. He had the driver of the blazer out of the vehicle and was giving him a few lessons about respect while he buddies all sat in the blazer watching their chauffeur get his brains beat in. I remember the bloody mouthed little turd screaming and crying and pleading with the passing motorists for someone to call the police on their "car phone" which at that time was still quite a luxury. A short while after we passed, as the police were coming northbound and trying to cross over, the carpenter made his way down the shoulder to the Richardson Road exit and faded into obscurity. I also remember traveling through Chesterfield Valley shortly after 40/61 re opened and seeing a euc truck parked in a hole in the levee with enough room to park another one beside it. We also spent a few evenings down at Ste. Gen filling sandbags at the Valle high school parking lot. One of those evenings, my girlfriend (now wife) was interviewed by a reporter from the Post Dispatch and her interviewed was included in an article he did about the volunteers. My girlfriend (now wife) bought her first new car from Neal Chevrolet in Festus that summer. Neal's lot was on the low ground and they had all of their inventory parked up and down Main Street as they tried to liquidate them. One final memory was K-SHE playing Jackyl's new hit single "When Will it Rain" about three times a day. Seemed like every time there was a shift change, the new DJ would start their shift with that song.
  12. Floated my favorite stretch of Big River Saturday with another local river rat whose wife is a long time co-worker of Jennifer's. Justin and I had been trying to get a trip together for quite some time but never could get our schedules to align. We were finally able to make it happen and were both looking forward to the trip. We got to the put in at daylight; only to discover that someone was already in front of us. We fished through the first quarter mile or so with only a couple of topwater blow ups. The river was it's usual clear for this stretch and was actually a little lower than normal for this time of the year. By the end of the first real hole we had caught the young couple who had put in before us and passed them. Now we had the water to ourselves. In the next hole, the day started to improve as we each landed our first keepers of the day. As we continued down river the clouds were building to the west and soon you could occasionally hear the distant rumble of thunder. Around 10:30 the rain had finally caught up with us and as luck would have it, we were in a hole with a bridge. We paddled down to the bridge and took refuge under it for the next hour. Around 11:30 the rain had subsided enough that we put on the rain jackets and pushed back out to finish the trip. We had lost about a foot of visibility but the river was still fishable and we continued to catch fish through the next good hole below. However, as we floated into that hole, the rain returned and this time was much like the rain that Forrest encountered in Vietnam. There was stinging rain, big o'l fat rain, and even rain straight up from underneath. As we neared the end of that hole, a pretty significant run off was dumping muddy water into the river thus cutting our visibility down to less than a foot. We decided to paddle through the next couple of holes in an attempt to get ahead of the mud and maybe salvage at least part of the second half of the float. As we paddled through the next big hole, which is a local swimming hole, the water visibility was down to less than six inches and we pretty much conceded the day. In the next hole down, the first of several intermittent creeks which had a flow strong enough that one could've floated them with minimal difficulty entered the river. Upon seeing this, we realized that this was probably not the best conditions to be on the river in and began to make a more concerted effort to paddle towards the weigh in. Each creek entering the river as we paddled toward the take out brought it's level a little higher and it's flow a little heavier. As we passed two of the more noticeable landmarks on this stretch, both were completely submerged and barely even breaking the water which lead us to conclude that the river had come up at least 3-4 feet. Another noticeable sign that the river was way high was that you could see out in several fields that you can't when the river is at a normal level. We covered that last couple of miles of the float in a little over 30 minutes and when we reached the take out the river was running about 2 feet over the road. Though the day had a rather abrupt ending we managed to catch 11 keepers; most of them being largemouths and each of us boated one over 18 inches. While we never felt threatened or unsafe because of the river conditions, I have a new appreciation for just how fast a small stream's personality can change and how quickly one can find themselves in a dangerous situation. First pic is of Justin with a 19 incher Me with an 18 1/2 incher. Repped the sleeveless shirt in honor of my good friend Joe D. and his adoration of my fishing wardrobe......... and also because I knew that the opportunity of catching a "picture" fish through this stretch would be high. Pic of the river crossing at the take out. I'm going to refrain from naming the access, but most that are familiar with Big River will recognize it right away.
  13. Show's your age Wrench.......................... Just kidding. I only say that because our local marine service tech, whom I imagine is around your age, won't work on I/Os anymore either. Says it hurts too much to anymore to have to work bent over or on your hands and knees in a hot engine compartment.
  14. Floated my favorite stretch of Big River Saturday with another local river rat whose wife is a long time co-worker of Jennifer's. Justin and I had been trying to get a trip together for quite some time but never could get our schedules to align. We were finally able to make it happen and were both looking forward to the trip. We got to the put in at daylight; only to discover that someone was already in front of us. We fished through the first quarter mile or so with only a couple of topwater blow ups. The river was it's usual clear for this stretch and was actually a little lower than normal for this time of the year. By the end of the first real hole we had caught the young couple who had put in before us and passed them. Now we had the water to ourselves. In the next hole, the day started to improve as we each landed our first keepers of the day. As we continued down river the clouds were building to the west and soon you could occasionally hear the distant rumble of thunder. Around 10:30 the rain had finally caught up with us and as luck would have it, we were in a hole with a bridge. We paddled down to the bridge and took refuge under it for the next hour. Around 11:30 the rain had subsided enough that we put on the rain jackets and pushed back out to finish the trip. We had lost about a foot of visibility but the river was still fishable and we continued to catch fish through the next good hole below. However, as we floated into that hole, the rain returned and this time was much like the rain that Forrest encountered in Vietnam. There was stinging rain, big o'l fat rain, and even rain straight up from underneath. As we neared the end of that hole, a pretty significant run off was dumping muddy water into the river thus cutting our visibility down to less than a foot. We decided to paddle through the next couple of holes in an attempt to get ahead of the mud and maybe salvage at least part of the second half of the float. As we paddled through the next big hole, which is a local swimming hole, the water visibility was down to less than six inches and we pretty much conceded the day. In the next hole down, the first of several intermittent creeks which had a flow strong enough that one could've floated them with minimal difficulty entered the river. Upon seeing this, we realized that this was probably not the best conditions to be on the river in and began to make a more concerted effort to paddle towards the weigh in. Each creek entering the river as we paddled toward the take out brought it's level a little higher and it's flow a little heavier. As we passed two of the more noticeable landmarks on this stretch, both were completely submerged and barely even breaking the water which lead us to conclude that the river had come up at least 3-4 feet. Another noticeable sign that the river was way high was that you could see out in several fields that you can't when the river is at a normal level. We covered that last couple of miles of the float in a little over 30 minutes and when we reached the take out the river was running about 2 feet over the road. Though the day had a rather abrupt ending we managed to catch 11 keepers; most of them being largemouths and each of us boated one over 18 inches. While we never felt threatened or unsafe because of the river conditions, I have a new appreciation for just how fast a small stream's personality can change and how quickly one can find themselves in a dangerous situation. First pic is of Justin with a 19 incher Me with an 18 1/2 incher. Repped the sleeveless shirt in honor of my good friend Joe D. and his adoration of my fishing wardrobe......... and also because I knew that the opportunity of catching a "picture" fish through this stretch would be high. Pic of the river crossing at the take out. I'm going to refrain from naming the access, but most that are familiar with Big River will recognize it right away. This post has been promoted to an article
  15. All kidding aside, I crossed over big river at Blackwell late this morning and an outfitter had just dumped in a dozen or so kayaks at the private access on the left just downstream from the bridge. Two passenger vans pulling empty canoe trailers were pointed toward Washington state park so I assume it was the outfitter from the park.
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