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#1 Phil Lilley

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 07:49 AM

For Immediate Release
June 8, 2006
A service of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation
News Contacts: Micah Holmes or Kristen Gillman (405) 521-3856
Web site: www.wildlifedepartment.com

Phelps elected to second term as chair of the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission
Mabrey appointed to second Wildlife Commission term
Oklahoma could lose conservation dollars
Q & A about the Selman Bat Watch
Outdoor Calendar
Fishing Report

Phelps elected to second term as chair of the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission
The Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission unanimously voted to approve a new slate of officers. Bill Phelps of Lawton was elected chairman for a second consecutive term; M. David Riggs of Sand Springs was elected vice-chairman; and Wade Brinkman, Altus was elected as secretary. Officers will serve a one-year term beginning July 1.
"It is appreciated and humbling to have my fellow commissioners give me the opportunity to serve again. I am really looking forward to working the next year with ODWC commissioners and the Wildlife Department in conserving Oklahoma's great wildlife resources," said Phelps, who is an active member of Ducks Unlimited, Quail Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the National Sporting Clays Association.
Phelps, who was appointed to the Commission in 2002, represents District 6 which encompasses Blaine, Kingfisher, Canadian, Caddo, Grady, Comanche, Stephens, Jefferson and Cotton counties. He has worked for CenterPoint Energy for 33 years, and since 1994 has served as the vice president and general manager of its Oklahoma Division. Phelps attended both the University of Arkansas-Monticello and East Texas State University majoring in agri-business.
In other business, Commissioners heard a presentation on the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation 2006 Landowner of the Year - Randy Lively, of Sharon. Producing beef, sheep and crops, the Lively Ranch is a diversified operation, but wildlife is always an important consideration in land management decisions.
"For several generations the Lively Ranch has placed an emphasis on quality wildlife habitat on the 2,000-acre property in Woodward County. Randy Lively is a great example of real-world conservation in action," said Wade Free, northwest region wildlife supervisor for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.
According to Free, Lively uses a variety of methods to encourage the growth of beneficial native plants including, patch burning, roller chopping, rotational grazing and strip disking. In northwest Oklahoma, water is always a top concern and Lively has built six separate watering areas which are used by both wildlife and cattle.
"When my kids were young, I realized that if I didn't manage for wildlife for my kids' future, nobody was going to do it for me," Lively said.
The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation has recognized a landowner conservationist each of the past 16 years and continues to work closely with landowners by providing technical assistance and in some cases financial support for land practices that benefit wildlife. Projects may include fencing, brush management, timber thinning, wetland restoration and more.
In employee matters, the Commission recognized Trent Hodgins, District Four Law Enforcement Chief, for his 35 years of outstanding service to the sportsmen of the state.
In other business, the Commission approved the 2007 fiscal year budget and approved a two percent cost of living increase for Department retirees. The retirees' increase is tied to the Consumer Price Index and will become effective July 1.
Additionally, the Commission received a report on the 2006 Legislative session. For a complete update on wildlife-related bills, log on to the Wildlife's Department legislative tracker at wildlifedepartment.com/legislation/htm.
The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Wildlife Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate.
The next scheduled Commission meeting is July 10 at the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation headquarters (auditorium), at the southwest corner of 18th and North Lincoln, Oklahoma City at 9 a.m.

*****Photo*****
Editor's note: Below is a link for accompanying photo and intended for newspaper publication. The ending link is .jpg for the photo. The photo will open in your browser. If you have a pc you should be able to right click, save picture as, choose the file type you want to save as and click save. The other way is on file in toolbar, save picture as, choosing the file type you want to save as and click save. Images can be viewed with the article at http://www.wildlifed...com/wl_news.htm.

High resolution - http://www.wildlifed.../phelpshigh.jpg

Low resolution - http://www.wildlifed...6/phelpslow.jpg

Caption: The Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission unanimously voted to approve a new slate of officers. Bill Phelps of Lawton was elected chairman for a second consecutive term.


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Mabrey appointed to second Wildlife Commission term
Bruce R. Mabrey, Okmulgee, was recently appointed by Gov. Brad Henry to serve another term on the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission. Mabrey's current term will run through 2014.
A lifelong resident of Okmulgee, Mabrey has been the executive officer of a family-owned bank holding company with ownership in several eastern Oklahoma banks. Mabrey, an avid hunter particularly of deer, elk and turkey, is currently the executive vice president of Citizens Security Bank & Trust Company in Okmulgee.
"It is a great honor to be able to serve the sportsmen and women of Oklahoma," Mabrey said. "I believe strongly in the youth of our state and I realize the importance of providing kids opportunities to go hunting and fishing. I'm confident we have taken some great strides in these efforts over the last few years with things like the Archery in the Schools program, the Wildlife Expo and the new youth turkey hunting season that takes effect next spring."
The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC). The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the ODWC, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate.
Mabrey, who earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, will serve as the Wildlife Commission's District 2 representative. The district includes Adair, Sequoyah, Cherokee, Wagoner, Muskogee, Haskell, McIntosh and Okmulgee counties.
Active in a number of local conservation organizations including Friends of the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, Eastern Oklahoma Chapter of the Quality Deer Management Association, National Rifle Association, National Wild Turkey Federation, Okmulgee County Bowhunters, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Boone and Crockett Club, Mabrey has also served as the past president for Okmulgee County Cattlemen's Association, Okmulgee Chamber of Commerce and Okmulgee Main Street Association.
Mabrey and his wife Karen have four children: two daughters, Mollye and Melanie, and two sons, Matt and Mark.

-30-


*****Photo*****
Editor's note: Below is a link for accompanying photo and intended for newspaper publication. The ending link is .jpg for the photo. The photo will open in your browser. If you have a pc you should be able to right click, save picture as, choose the file type you want to save as and click save. The other way is on file in toolbar, save picture as, choosing the file type you want to save as and click save. Images can be viewed with the article at http://www.wildlifed...com/wl_news.htm.

200 dpi resolution - http://www.wildlifed...0806/mabrey.jpg

Caption: Bruce R. Mabrey, Okmulgee, was recently appointed by Gov. Brad Henry to serve another term on the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission. Mabrey's current term will run through 2014.


Oklahoma could lose conservation dollars
Most Oklahomans know something about the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's work to conserve bald eagles, horny toads and interior least terns. What may not be such common knowledge is the work that's being done on behalf of squirrel tree frogs, tiger salamanders, regal fritillary butterflies, prairie warblers, long-billed curlews, swift foxes and some 230 other species of conservation concern.
The goal, said Ron Suttles, coordinator of the Department's natural resources and wildlife diversity program, is to keep additional species from becoming threatened or endangered.
Like wildlife agencies from all 50 states, the Wildlife Department depends on a federal aid program called State Wildlife Grants for funding wildlife diversity efforts. According to a new report that documents the last five years of the program, state fish and wildlife agencies are working ahead to prevent threats to habitat, population and health, and making a real difference for America's wildlife.
Despite the success of the federal aid program, it recently received a major cut in the U.S. House of Representatives when they recommended only $50 million of the $74.7 million in the President's budget.
In March, a bipartisan group of 170 representatives and 56 senators, including Oklahoma's Sen. James Inhofe and Reps. Tom Cole and Dan Boren, called for increased State Wildlife Grant funding. The Senate still needs to consider the appropriation.
Since 2001, Oklahoma has received an average of $790,000 a year in State Wildlife Grants. At least $1.1 million state and partner dollars have matched those funds. If Congress does cut the funding to $50 million in the final 2007 budget, Oklahoma's effort to keep wildlife off the endangered species list will shrink by nearly $350,000.
Prior to State Wildlife Grants, virtually no federal funding focused on preventing wildlife from becoming endangered. The federal grants are designed to help wildlife agencies create programs that fit their states' wildlife diversity needs. In Oklahoma, the grants are used to study species not usually looked at.
In a survey of 32 states, State Wildlife Grants was the single largest source of funds for wildlife diversity programs.
"The grants have been a boon to struggling budgets," Suttles said. "They're essential to maintaining our diversity of birds, fishes, mammals, mussels and their habitats."
Oklahoma's 1999 wildlife diversity budget was $230,000. State Wildlife Grants provided nearly $930,000 in 2005 alone.
"This funding is as important to Oklahoma's people as it is to the wildlife," Suttles said. "These same natural places that keep wildlife populations healthy also contribute to our quality of life and outdoor traditions here in Oklahoma."
To remain eligible for State Wildlife Grants, all 50 states were required to submit to Congress by last October Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategies, also known as wildlife action plans. Oklahoma and other states met that challenge. Nationwide, these dynamic action plans are the source of ideas for wildlife diversity conservation projects to keep native wildlife populations healthy in every state.
"Oklahoma's action plan identifies some species we know virtually nothing about," Suttles said. "We need to fill information gaps to make informed management decisions and benefit these lesser known species."
Now funding to implement the action plans is in jeopardy.
"We need the State Wildlife Grants program to keep Oklahoma's wildlife and the places where they live healthy now and into the future for generations of Oklahomans yet to come," he said.
For more information about State Wildlife Grants visit www.teaming.com.
The Wildlife Diversity Program - a program of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation - monitors, manages and promotes rare, declining, and endangered wildlife, as well as common wildlife not fished or hunted. Oklahomans help fund the Wildlife Diversity Program through an annual state income tax check-off, the purchase of wildlife conservation specialty license plates, product purchases, and individual donations. Find out more at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

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*****Photo*****
Editor's note: Below is a link for accompanying photo and intended for newspaper publication. The ending link is .jpg for the photo. The photo will open in your browser. If you have a pc you should be able to right click, save picture as, choose the file type you want to save as and click save. The other way is on file in toolbar, save picture as, choosing the file type you want to save as and click save. Images can be viewed with the article at http://www.wildlifed...com/wl_news.htm.

High resolution - http://www.wildlifed...dcurlewhigh.jpg

Low resolution - http://www.wildlifed...edcurlewlow.jpg


Caption: Biologists are gathering information about the number/abundance of long-billed curlews in Oklahoma and their distribution. In the process, biologists have discovered curlews are found in different habitats than previously known, raising interesting questions to be answered in order to keep their populations healthy into the future.

Side bar stories:

Oklahoma State Wildlife Grant Success Stories:
Gathering Information to Take Action - Freshwater Mussel Study
The state's wildlife and people will continue to enjoy clean water and healthy stream systems, in part, through an Oklahoma freshwater mussel study funded by State Wildlife Grants. Freshwater mussels play a primary role in keeping lakes and streams clean.
Since the health of wildlife is often an early indicator of disease and pollution, understanding the relationship between water conditions and freshwater mussels will benefit wildlife and people. Information gathered in the study will help gain a clearer understanding of this relationship and will provide important data that can influence natural resource management decisions.

*****Photo*****
Editor's note: Below is a link for accompanying photo and intended for newspaper publication. The ending link is .jpg for the photo. The photo will open in your browser. If you have a pc you should be able to right click, save picture as, choose the file type you want to save as and click save. The other way is on file in toolbar, save picture as, choosing the file type you want to save as and click save. Images can be viewed with the article at http://www.wildlifed...com/wl_news.htm.

High resolution - http://www.wildlifed...lectionhigh.jpg

Low resolution - http://www.wildlifed...llectionlow.jpg


Caption: Biologists take measurements from mussels in an Oklahoma stream to answer a pressing question - Are, they reproducing or is the population entirely adult mussels? With answers, biologists can conserve Oklahomašs mussels before they become more rare and more costly to protect.


Benefiting Wildlife and People - Patch Burning Project
A State Wildlife Grant project will test an innovative new land management approach that makes it possible to simultaneously maintain livestock production and manage for native wildlife species. The technique is called patch burning, and it's receiving international attention.
Historically, wild fires and grazing influenced the grasslands of the Great Plains. Patch burning mimics these historical conditions and results in nutrient-rich forbs and a greater diversity of plants and animals. Patch burning was first tested on Oklahoma's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve with beneficial results to both biodiversity, and agricultural production.
To discover if it will benefit other natural areas around the state, biologists will test patch burning at Cooper Wildlife Management Area near Fort Supply in western Oklahoma. If successful, area landowners can use patch burning to benefit their own pastures and native wildlife.


Conservation of Land, Water and Wildlife - Conserving Wild Birds
Oklahoma's wild birds capture the attention of more than 700,000 people every year. State Wildlife Grants is helping the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and its partners benefit approximately 300 migratory species of songbirds, waterfowl, shorebirds and water birds that spend time in Oklahoma.
Oklahoma biologists are working with partners in other states and countries to identify conservation actions across geographic borders. Working together, biologists can restore and protect the natural places these birds live so they may continue to bring peace and relaxation to bird watching enthusiasts.



Q & A about the Selman Bat Watch

Discover a far-from-ordinary summer adventure in Oklahoma through this Q&A with Jenny Thom, Wildlife Department information specialist:

Q: Is it true that there is now an official state of Oklahoma flying mammal?
A: Yes! In April, Governor Henry designated the Mexican free-tailed bat as the state-flying mammal.

Q: Do Mexican free-tailed bats live here year round?
A: No. The bats travel 1,400 miles each spring to give birth and raise their young in Oklahoma. In late summer, the bats begin their return trip to Mexico and Central America.

Q: Where in Oklahoma do these bats go?
A: Mexican free-tailed bats migrate to about five different sites throughout Oklahoma. The largest colony in Oklahoma annually gathers on the Selman Bat Cave Wildlife Management Area in the northwest. The Wildlife Department manages the area to protect the bats.

Q: Can the public see the bats?
A: Yes. The Selman Bat Watch Program provides an opportunity to watch these bats. You can see more than a million bats leaving the cave and fly directly over your head.

Q: What makes the bats do this?
A: Around dusk the bats leave their roost to dine on flying insects in the night sky. Because this is a natural event, we never know the exact time it will happen. But the bats eat every night, so they fly every night.

Q: How many insects can one Mexican free-tailed bat eat in a night?
A: 600 - which means the bat colony at Selman eats more than 10 tons (20,000 pounds) of flying beetles, moths and mosquitoes every night!

Q: When is the Bat Watch?
A: The Bat Watch begins July 6 and happens each Thursday, Friday and Saturday night the rest of the month. That means you have 12 chances in July to see the bats. Thursday nights start at 7:15 p.m.; Friday and Saturday nights start at 6:00 p.m.

Q: Where is the Bat Watch?
A: It begins at Alabaster Caverns State Park near Freedom, Okla. Registered Bat Watch participants are escorted to the bat-viewing area from there.

Q: Do I have to register to attend a Bat Watch?
A: Yes. Each night is limited to 75 people and the sessions typically fill up pretty quickly. So, to ensure you have a place we require a reservation.

Q: Is there a registration deadline?
A: Register by June 26. Sign up early, because evenings fill quickly. In fact, Friday, July 7 Saturday, July 8 and Saturday, July 15 are already closed. You can check to see which dates are still open and download a registration form at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

Q: What does it cost?
A: Adults cost $10; Children (12 & under) cost $5.

Q: How can I find out more about this summer's Selman Bat Watch?
A: Log on to www.wildlifedepartment.com or call (405) 424-0099.


*****Photo*****
Editor's note: Below is a link for accompanying photo and intended for newspaper publication. The ending link is .jpg for the photo. The photo will open in your browser. If you have a pc you should be able to right click, save picture as, choose the file type you want to save as and click save. The other way is on file in toolbar, save picture as, choosing the file type you want to save as and click save. Images can be viewed with the article at http://www.wildlifed...com/wl_news.htm.

High resolution - http://www.wildlifed...tchbatshigh.jpg

Low resolution - http://www.wildlifed...atchbatslow.jpg

Caption: The amazing natural spectacle of flying bats attracts visitors from all across Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and New Mexico to the Selman Bat Watch.


High resolution - http://www.wildlifed...tsunsethigh.jpg

Low resolution - http://www.wildlifed...atsunsetlow.jpg

Caption: Watch millions of bats fly overhead against the setting sun as they leave their cave to dine on more than 10 tons of insects.


OUTDOOR CALENDAR

JUNE

14: Bluebird Education at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shops. Bluebird Bob Walshaw will give a hands-on talk on Bluebirds, how and where to put up nest boxes and how to deal with the killer house sparrows.T his unique seminar will take place upstairs in the Seminar Room next to the restrooms.
Starts at 7:30 pm.

15: Aquatic Education Clinic: ODWC Family Clinic, Casting Pond at ODWC, Jenks. Pre-registration is required. Register by calling ODWC- Jenks at (918) 299-2334.

16: Aquatic Education Clinic at G.S.P. Pond, Greenleaf State Park. Pre-registration is required. Register by calling Steven Evans at (918) 487-7125.

17: Aquatic Education Clinic: Cherokee WMA Clinic ay Cherokee WMA Pond. Pre-registration is required. Register by calling Ron Justice (918) 485-5751.

17: Quality Deer Management Workshops at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shops. Heath Herje from Quality Deer Management will be conducting two back to back workshops each time he is with us in house. These workshops will be in the Hunting Department.

17 & 18: Wildlife Tours at Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Have an opportunity to view wildlife on a bus tour of Pinchot Loop in the Special Use Area. You may get to see young buffalo and longhorn calves. Reservation are required and $3 per person will be collected at the beginning of the tour. For more information or to make reservations contact the Refuge Headquarters at (580) 429-3222. Only one family reservation per phone call. Tour will start at the headquarters.

17: KIDS DAY 2006. A Kids Day Aquatic Education Fishing Event at the Bass Pro Shops Lake, Broken Arrow. Pre Registration is required at the store. Registration is limited to the first 100 kids in each age category. The age groups are: up to 6 yrs., 7and 8, 9 and 10 & 11 and 12. Registration will begin June 1st. Anyone on the lake will need to sign a liability release and no fishing license is needed for this event since it is a Aquatics Education Training Event. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation is conducting training classes prior to each age group fishing. These classes will be held in our Seminar Room and outside on the lake. The time period for this event is 9 am to 4 pm. Length of fishing time will depend upon the number of entrants signed up in each age category. ***Bass Pro reserves the right to make any changes or cancel any event(s) at any time***********

17: Shotgun Training and Education Program event at the Oklahoma Trapshooting Association range. The event starts at noon. For more information contact Tim Slavin at (405) 378-0776. The event is being held for disabled individuals but anyone may attend and become involved.

17: Aquatic Education Clinic: Cordell Kiwanis Club, Cordell City Pond. Pre-registration is required. Register by calling Damon Springer (405) 521-4603.

17: Hunter Education: Community Center, Owasso. 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918) 299-2334.

17: Aquatic Education Clinic: Dolese Youth Park Pond, OKC Parks and Rec. Pre-registration is required. Register by calling Bob Martin at (405) 755-4014.

17: The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife will be conducting the sixth annual Kid's Camp at the Cherokee Wildlife Management area. The one-day camp runs from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and is for youth 15 and under. There is no charge or pre-registration required. Scheduled events include archery, BB gun, paint ball, .22 rifle, primitive firearms, and shotgun ranges with instructors. In addition, participants can fish in a stocked pond, visit reptile displays, mountain men demonstrations, knife making, trapping, and wildlife exhibits. Food and drinks as well as the use of fishing tackle, ammo, and firearms will be provided free of charge to all who attend. The WMA is approximately 10 miles east of Fort Gibson, OK on highway 62, and then 2 miles south at the Midway Conoco to the Zeb Entrance. Go 1 more mile inside the entrance to the WMA Headquarters. For additional information contact Ron Justice at (918) 260-8959.

18: Fathers Day at Bass Pro Shop in Broken Arrow. Kids! Win A Fishing Trip for You and Your Dad!!
Doc Geiger who is the Host of "Doc Geiger's Outdoor Adventures" Television Show and Redhead Fishing Pro Staffer will be hosting a Father and Youth Fishing Trip. Youth ages 13 and under may participate in the drawing for the one day guided trip. Trip plans will have to be coordinated with Doc Geiger.


FISHING REPORT FOR JUNE 7, 2006

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Elevation below normal. Channel catfish good on cut shad and punch bait. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Hefner: Elevation below normal. Channel catfish good on cut shad and punch bait. Walleye good. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Overholser: Elevation below normal. Channel catfish good on cut shad and punch bait. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Thunderbird: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. below normal and clear. Crappie moving to deeper water and slowing down, fair to good at 6-8 ft. on minnows and jigs around structure. White bass good off points wading or trolling with medium divers and jigs. Catfish fair on stinkbaits late and early nighttime. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Wes Watkins: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. below normal, water 84. Channel catfish excellent at 3-4 ft. on cut shad, stinkbaits, gold fish and spinners. Bass good on spinners and jigs at 6-8 ft. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs in deeper water. White bass good on rattle traps and medium-diving crankbaits off points. Report submitted by Ronnie Arganbright, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County.

Wes Watkins: Elevation 3 ft. below normal, water 75-83 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on assorted dark colored soft plastics around grassy beds in deep water. Catfish being caught in shallow water on minnows, chicken liver, shrimp, blood baits and worms. White bass are being caught trolling the north side of the lake by the swim beach and along the north side of the dam. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-11 ft. and just above bottom. Report submitted M. M. Fowler
at St. Gregory.

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at 7 ft. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game stationed in Lincoln County.

Birch: Elevation normal and clear. Crappie good off of the docks on minnows and jigs. Striped bass hybrids good in the early morning and late evening on live shad. Catfish good in the creek channel and on the flats on cut fish and shad. Report submitted by Ben Bickerstaff, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Carl Blackwell: Largemouth bass being caught in good cover in mornings and evenings with spinners, plastic worms, and rooster tails. Crappie still going strong with jigs, minnows, and road runners (green and white with some red doing well). Striped bass hybrids very active at 20-26 ft. on minnows, shad imitations and trolling. Channel catfish are at there best, fish off the bottom, especially in evenings with minnows, stinkbait, chicken liver. Saugeye good trolling on crawler rigs, some are being caught off the bank with minnows and other crappie jigs. Report submitted by Tyler Gann, Lake Ranger.

Chandler: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Eucha: Elevation 6 ft. below normal, water 75 and murky. Crappie good on jigs and minnows around brush and structure at 6-10 ft. Largemouth good on jerk baits and topwater off rocky points. Catfish fair on cut shad. Bluegill good on crickets and worms in coves. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries.

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and clear. Largemouth bass good on spinners in flooded grass and timber. White bass good on slabs and spinners. Channel catfish good on cut bait and shad. Reported submitted Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Muskogee and Wagoner Counties.

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and clear. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits, topwater lures early morning and late evening. White bass fair on minnows and jigs in river channel at 15 ft. Channel catfish good on prepared baits, cut shad on trotlines and juglines. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush at 10 ft. Report submitted by Don Cole, game warden stationed in Wagoner County.

Grand: Elevation normal and murky. Crappie fair to good on minnows or jigs at 10-15 ft. White bass fair to good in the mouth of the lake and tributaries on spinnerbaits and spoons. Channel catfish fair to good on the mud flats areas and river channel on cut shad or worms. Report submitted by Jim Littlefield, game warden stationed in Delaware County.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal and clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits, jigs and worms. Catfish fair on liver and worms and cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hudson: Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal. White bass fair to good on small jigs and spoons. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Mayes County.

Hulah: Elevation 1 ft. above normal lake level and murky. Catfish good on jugs baited with cut fish and shad. Crappie fair around brush piles on minnows and jigs. Currently no water is running below the dam and cat fishing is good using worms and cut fish. Report submitted by Ben Bickerstaff, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Kaw: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water 79 and stained. Blue catfish are good on juglines baited with shad around rocky points in 5-15 ft. of water. Channel catfish are good on riprap on worms and stinkbait at 2-10 ft. White bass fair trolling crankbaits in main lake. White bass fair in tailwaters on minnows. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Kay and Grant counties.

Oologah: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water in the 70's and muddy on the north end and clear on the south end. White bass good trolling with shad-colored lures on flats near the main lake at 10-15 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 15-18 ft. Channel catfish fair along rocky banks on worm and doughbaits at 5-10 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Skiatook: Elevation 5 ft. below normal, water 75 degrees and murky. Smallmouth and largemouth bass fair, at 10 -15 ft. on crankbaits, spinnerbaits, and in deeper water around structures, with plastics. Some smallmouth bass caught on topwater lures. Crappie fair on small and medium minnows at 10-25 ft. around bridges and other structure, and in the creeks. No reports on striped bass hybrids. Flathead catfish fair to good on trotlines with perch and very large minnows. Report submitted by Greenwood Fishing Center.

Sooner: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. below normal, water 78 and clear. Striped bass and striped bass hybrids good on live shad on mid-lake humps at 27-38 ft. Report submitted by Paul Tennies, Pete's Place.

Sooner: Elevation normal, water 81 and clear. Striped bass hybrids and stripers good in main lake on live shad and three inch sassy shad. Largemouth bass fair around weed beds on buzzbaits and lipless crankbaits. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Kay and Grant counties.

Spavinaw: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. below normal, water 80 and clear. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Catfish fair on cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries.

Tenkiller: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 75 and clear. Largemouth fair off rocky points on bass jigs or
crankbaits. Crappie fair trolling mid-lake in the channel with deep-running lures and around brush on tube jigs or roadrunners. Catfish slow with some action drifting cut baits at 10-20 ft. Sunfish good around docks on worms and good along gravel banks. Report by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels and along riprap. Catfish good on sunfish and cut bait on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush structure at 8-12 ft. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Channel catfish good along dam on live bait and stinkbait. White bass and striped bass hybrids good trolling crankbaits. Walleye fair drifting night crawlers crappie fair in upper end of lake on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal and clear. Channel catfish good on stinkbait, liver, cut bait in shallow water along the edges of the lake. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County.

Great Salt Plains: Channel catfish excellent on trotlines baited with cut shad around the island and fair drifting with stinkbait and shad in main lake. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Kay and Grant counties.
SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 81. Crappie fair to good on wiggle tail grubs. White bass are chasing shad on top off points east of dam. Bass fair using topwater and soft plastics at 12 -15 ft. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Broken Bow: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on Carolina-rigged soft plastic baits at 10-12 ft. near rocky points. White bass fair on topwater lures fished in the evening on the main body of the lake. Channel catfish are good on punch bait fished on the bottom near the mouths of creeks. Walleye good on Carolina rigged dark plastic baits at 10-15 ft. near rocky points mid-day. Report submitted by Todd Tobey, game warden stationed in Pittsburg County.

Eufaula: Elevation 1 3/4 ft. below normal and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits at 3-8 ft. around brush. White bass good on jigs at 4-10 ft. around bridges. Blue catfish good on shad at 8-20 ft. on juglines. Crappie fair on jigs at 8-20 ft. around bridges. Report submitted Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

Hugo: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water 75 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Crappie fair on live minnows. Channel catfish fair on cut bait. Report submitted by Wendell Smalling, game warden stationed in Choctaw County.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures in weed beds at 5-8 ft. Channel catfish good on shad and chicken liver in south cove at 5-10 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 77 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and spinners at 2-6 ft. around standing timber. Channel catfish fair on juglines and trotlines on live bait along rocky shorelines and riprap. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout are being caught using midges, caddis flies, ants, stimulators, grasshoppers, adams, soft hackles and wooly buggers. Report submitted by Sid Ingram, Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal, water 77 and murky. Bass fair on plastic worms around points at 8-12 ft. Crappie good on minnows in 4-12 ft. Catfish fair on night crawlers when yo-yoed in creek channels. Sunfish good on worms throughout the lake. Report Submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 70 and murky. Blue and flathead catfish good on the flats along the river and creek channels on shad or live sunfish fished near or on the bottom. Striped bass fair in the lower Illinois River with live shad or trout fished bobber style at 5 ft. and in the Canadian River on various top water plugs. Largemouth bass fair along the weed beds with various plastic baits, worms and lizards. Report submitted by Jerry Henry, game warden stationed in Sequoyah County.

Sardis Lake: Elevation normal and slightly murky. Largemouth bass good around the islands. White bass good trolling around the islands. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Flathead catfish good on live bait. Crappie excellent on minnows. Walleye good trolling around the islands. Report submitted by Todd Tobey, game warden stationed in Pittsburg County.

Texoma: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 77 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on plastic baits at 10-15 ft. near creek channel and points. Striped bass and white bass fair to good at 10-20 ft. on live shad and sassy shad at Washita point and Burns Run. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on cut shad and live sunfish at 10-20 ft. in Newberry Creek and lower Washita River. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. around structure and fishing docks. Sunfish good on worms at 5-10 ft. around fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: Elevation normal, water 74 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinners and soft plastics near points. Catfish good on cut bait, worms, or crawdads near rocky areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near brush piles and cover. Report submitted by Thomas Gillham, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.


SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: Elevation 11 ft. below normal and murky. Crappie fair at 8-12 ft. around structure on minnows and jigs. Catfish fair on cut bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Foss: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. below normal, water 78 and clear. Striped bass hybrids and walleye good on live bait. White bass fair. Crappie slow. Bass slow. Catfish good. Best fishing times are early morning and late evening. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation normal. Catfish fair on cut baits. Saugeye fair drifting night crawlers. Report submitted by James L. Edwards, Jr., game warden station in Caddo County.

Waurika: Elevation below normal, water 80 and murky. White bass and striped bass hybrids good drifting with shad and minnows, jigging with white jigs or slabs and trolling. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines baited with shad and minnows and on rod and reel with shad and punch bait. Crappie slow. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County.

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