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fishinwrench

Mourning The Passing Of The High Bank Hole

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I don't oppose enhancing fishing for anyone, but I think the money could be better spent. Lets face it, dumping trout in a warm water pond during a time when they can survive isn't exposing people to a different kind of fishing, just another fish. Do any of you really think the experience represents trout fishing? I'm sure there are some who trout fish these lakes, but I'm sure others, and they are probably the majority, see an opportunity to fill the freezer. It's common at the parks and there's no reason to think different at urban ponds.

I think supplying urban kids with equipment and instruction to give them an experience that can be repeated without economic help would be a bigger bang for the buck.

Justin it would be great if I could agree with your assessment about Missouri's trout fishing, but it in no way compares to the areas where they are native. We can be thankful that we have what we have, especially the rare areas where they survive on their own.

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Justin it would be great if I could agree with your assessment about Missouri's trout fishing, but it in no way compares to the areas where they are native

I've never had the priveledge of fishing where they are native and there can be no comparison as that is the only "true" trout water. But our state as a whole allows all types of fishermen with all skill sets the ability to catch trout fairly close to home. From a Zebco 33 to a custom made bamboo rod people of all means and demographics can go catch trout if they wish. The state evidently thinks this is a good use of resources and I can't argue with that. The urban trout program kind of levels the playing field including the entire state instead of limiting access to areas that are for the most part remote.

I'm going to stick to one of the rare areas where rainbows reproduce on their own, but by no means think they should stop any of the other programs.

Do any of you really think the experience represents trout fishing?

I've never fished a mountain lake with trout in it, but wouldn't you fish these similar to how you would fish for them in a stocked pond?

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I don't oppose enhancing fishing for anyone, but I think the money could be better spent. Lets face it, dumping trout in a warm water pond during a time when they can survive isn't exposing people to a different kind of fishing, just another fish. Do any of you really think the experience represents trout fishing?

To me it represents trout fishing about as accurately as standing arsehole to elbow with fellow anglers at a trout park trying to entice a fish, which has spent all of four hours in the stream, to eat my canned corn. Some folks enjoy doing those things, and I'm not about to tell them they can't or shouldn't. I'd rather base my judgment of a program on whether it accomplishes its goals, not whether I agree with it.

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I've never fished a mountain lake with trout in it, but wouldn't you fish these similar to how you would fish for them in a stocked pond?

I don't think so. I haven't fished a lot of lakes for trout. I used to make a trip or two in the spring to the Alvord desert in Oregon to fish Mann lake. Mann lake had Lahonton Cutts and you had to fool them, not feed them. I fished other lakes on occasion and they could be tough and you had to fish them with some stealth. I don't think the trout in this state have to be wild to offer a challenge, they just need time to reclaim their instincts.

OB, just what is the goal exactly?

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. I don't think the trout in this state have to be wild to offer a challenge, they just need time to reclaim their instincts.

OB,

If you have ever fished for a "trout park" lunker that has been walked on, stomped on, and snagged on throughout the summer, then you know that Wayne's statement is right on the money. You won't find a more challenging fish to hook up with. Most times they will send you home talking to yourself.

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I've never fished a mountain lake with trout in it, but wouldn't you fish these similar to how you would fish for them in a stocked pond?

Not remotely. For five years, I lived a half hour from Trapper's Lake in Colorado, one of the most famous native trout fisheries in the country... and if you used the same methods people do at Busch ( bright yellow marabou jigs, Powerbait, canned corn, etc) you could fish all day and never get a bite. You actually have to use flies and lures that represent real trout food. I just can't draw the slightest comparison between fishing a stocked pond and an honest to goodness natural trout fishery. For that matter I can't really draw much of a comparison between fishing a trout park and fishing a real resident or wild trout fishery right here in Missouri.

What that has to do with the original topic of the thread...um, well I'm pretty sure it has nothing to do with it.

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Now would I do that ? :lol:

The reason I started the thread was because when I saw it I said "Aww WTF, what a darn shame", and I knew that there's some guys out there that would feel likewise.

I don't fish the park much anymore, matter of fact last Sunday was the first time I'd fished it in over a year, but I have always used that stretch to learn or perfect techniques. Trout park fish bite just like wild'er trout so a little practice in the park where you're likely to get alot of bites is excellent sparring practice for learning to detect strikes, experimenting with weight placement, setting the hook, and testing all types of flys that also work elsewhere.

The High Bank is the only stretch along the Spring branch where you have complex currents and actual "lies" where fish hold in current seams and overhanging branches demand some casting skills. It is a good place to learn, and then later practice "real flyfishing".

Plus, the weedbeds there never got trampled through so they hosted excellent hatches of baetis mayflys, midges, and little brown caddis at certain times...and YES the fish get darn selective to them. The weedbeds are also loaded with scuds at times and that section never sees the weed cutting boat.

Another plus to the High Bank was that (if you kept an eye out for copperheads, and hikers on the trail) you could duck into the woods on the river-right and take a leak without having to stop fishing completely and hike a darn 1/4 mile.

So, when I said that the HB was the only "natural" stretch of the Spring creek.... those are the type of things I was referring to.

For myself and a bunch of others it holds some fine memories and it was always comforting to know that it was there. I taught my oldest kid how to flyfish there and I have another one coming of age in a few years that I hoped to be able to do the same. Big blue plastic tubes spewing hatchery overflow, concrete stairs, walkways and pruned trees take alot more away from that stretch than it adds. Especially since the only plus to that disgusting modification is cheaper trout for the city mudholes during the Winter.

Fine memories for the high bank ..... many a good time for sure. Awesome dries on a summer's eve. Nymphing during the C&R. Swinging SH's in the current. Stripping leeches and slumpbusters. Fishing midges during the summer and fall. I'm gonna miss it. PC

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Not remotely. For five years, I lived a half hour from Trapper's Lake in Colorado, one of the most famous native trout fisheries in the country... and if you used the same methods people do at Busch ( bright yellow marabou jigs, Powerbait, canned corn, etc) you could fish all day and never get a bite. You actually have to use flies and lures that represent real trout food. I just can't draw the slightest comparison between fishing a stocked pond and an honest to goodness natural trout fishery. For that matter I can't really draw much of a comparison between fishing a trout park and fishing a real resident or wild trout fishery right here in Missouri.

What that has to do with the original topic of the thread...um, well I'm pretty sure it has nothing to do with it.

I have to say I don't agree with this. I can't speak for the stocked warm water lakes as I've never fished one. But I don't agree there are no similarities between fishing the trout parks and fishing for wild trout. I've fished quite a bit out west. There are some areas in CO that are more challenging than say Bennett Springs. But some streams where the fishing is easier. 2 summers ago I fished the Big Thompson outside Estes Park for a week for wild browns and rainbows. I used many of the same flies and techniques that work well at Bennett, Roaring River, and Montauk and caught plenty of trout. One day fishing the smaller, wilder and more remote waters in RMNP - I used a foam beetle that I have often in the past at Roaring River and absolutely slayed them (wild browns) that day.

Greg

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