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Walleye Spawn


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#1 frying eyes

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:58 PM

I've always heard the walleye spawn in Missouri is never that successful because the water warms quick therefore short spawn.this year since the water temp has been mid to upper 40s for a long time, will it produce a better natural spawn?like to hear everyone's option.

Thanks

#2 Harps

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:33 PM

I don't have any options for you. :confident:

 

 

I would suggest contacting this guy to answer your questions, and post what you find out from him.

 

 

Fisheries Management Biologist
Adam Boman
Southwest Regional Office
2630 N. Mayfair
Springfield, MO, 65803

417-895-6880

adam.boman@mdc.mo.gov


#3 Krazo

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 09:44 PM

There are many factors that affect walleye spawning success, as with other fish species.  Factors include but are not limited to water flow/levels, spawning fish condition, larval food availability, and as you mentioned, water temperatures. Although a number of factors have been identified, there remain many unanswered questions concerning walleye natural spawning success.  Yes, walleye do spawn at Stockton.  However, the recruitment of naturally spawned walleye into the population is sporadic and inconsistent.  For this reason, walleye fingerlings are stocked into Stockton to maintain desired harvest levels.   It is important to realize high variability in walleye recruitment is widely recognized in reservoirs.  Your question “I've always heard the walleye spawn in Missouri is never that successful because the water warms quick therefore short spawn.  This year since the water temp has been in the mid to upper 40s for a long time, will it produce a better natural spawn?”   The short answer is that consistent water temperatures are good for walleye spawning success, but this year’s cold water temperatures are not exactly favorable.  The reason is that good phytoplankton and zooplankton production are a key to larval walleye survival and growth.  Zooplankton species are the initial food of larval walleye.  Cool spring water temperatures do not set up well for phytoplankton and zooplankton production and thus affect larval walleye survival.  In our walleye hatchery ponds we have observed a number of years where cool and persistent temperatures prohibit phytoplankton and zooplankton production and result in low numbers of walleye fingerlings coming from production ponds that were stocked with thousands of fry.  In my opinion, the best case scenario for natural walleye spawning conditions come during years with “average” water temperatures, (not the extremes) when there are not wide fluctuations in water temperature.  Studies have shown that large temperature fluctuations can negatively affect larval walleye survival. The last notable walleye year class that was naturally spawned at Stockton was in 2011.  This was a year when walleye were not stocked into the lake and yet a good number of young of the year walleye were sampled in the fall.  Surface water temperature in the dam area of the lake on 3/28/11 was 48F.  This year the surface water temperature in the dam area was 43F on the 27th of March.  I hope this information answers your question.  Good luck out there.



#4 Krazo

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 09:45 PM

There are many factors that affect walleye spawning success, as with other fish species.  Factors include but are not limited to water flow/levels, spawning fish condition, larval food availability, and as you mentioned, water temperatures. Although a number of factors have been identified, there remain many unanswered questions concerning walleye natural spawning success.  Yes, walleye do spawn at Stockton.  However, the recruitment of naturally spawned walleye into the population is sporadic and inconsistent.  For this reason, walleye fingerlings are stocked into Stockton to maintain desired harvest levels.   It is important to realize high variability in walleye recruitment is widely recognized in reservoirs.  Your question “I've always heard the walleye spawn in Missouri is never that successful because the water warms quick therefore short spawn.  This year since the water temp has been in the mid to upper 40s for a long time, will it produce a better natural spawn?”   The short answer is that consistent water temperatures are good for walleye spawning success, but this year’s cold water temperatures are not exactly favorable.  The reason is that good phytoplankton and zooplankton production are a key to larval walleye survival and growth.  Zooplankton species are the initial food of larval walleye.  Cool spring water temperatures do not set up well for phytoplankton and zooplankton production and thus affect larval walleye survival.  In our walleye hatchery ponds we have observed a number of years where cool and persistent temperatures prohibit phytoplankton and zooplankton production and result in low numbers of walleye fingerlings coming from production ponds that were stocked with thousands of fry.  In my opinion, the best case scenario for natural walleye spawning conditions come during years with “average” water temperatures, (not the extremes) when there are not wide fluctuations in water temperature.  Studies have shown that large temperature fluctuations can negatively affect larval walleye survival. The last notable walleye year class that was naturally spawned at Stockton was in 2011.  This was a year when walleye were not stocked into the lake and yet a good number of young of the year walleye were sampled in the fall.  Surface water temperature in the dam area of the lake on 3/28/11 was 48F.  This year the surface water temperature in the dam area was 43F on the 27th of March.  I hope this information answers your question.  Good luck out there.

that was Adam's response



#5 frying eyes

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 10:02 PM

Thanks for the info, good to know we have people that smart working for MDC.
Hopefully it warms up so we can fish!

Spell correction OPINION :)

#6 murphdog

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 06:36 AM

Great report and explanation!  Really appreciate the knowledge.


Life's way to short not to fish!

#7 powerdive

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:49 PM

Superb! Thanks, Krazo!






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