pruett417

Fellows Lake Muskies

52 posts in this topic

If it's legal, I can't get all that upset........but saying that why can't the MDC make Muskie fishing on Fellows catch and release only? It cost a lot of money and years to grow a trophy size Muskie.........I would think that C&R on that small of a lake would be a no brainer and have a closed season during the summer.

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If it's legal, I can't get all that upset........but saying that why can't the MDC make Muskie fishing on Fellows catch and release only? It cost a lot of money and years to grow a trophy size Muskie.........I would think that C&R on that small of a lake would be a no brainer and have a closed season during the summer.

I doubt if muskie fishing in Missouri would ever go to catch and release. However, I feel there may be some support for the size limit to be raised. I would like to see the limit set at 45", especially if there are a lot of low 40" muskies found in the lake.

I can never see the lake being closed to fishing during summer. I don't know of any lake that does that. However, a good deal of muskie fishermen in other states stop fishing for muskies when the water surface temperatures reach 80. I'm not sure how I feel about that, but I do feel there should be some emphasis on educating others on proper handling and releasing muskies for another day. The proper handling is not only for releasing the muskie, but for safety too.

Are there any recent reports on the condition of the water and what impact it is having on the muskies? Are more muskies being found floating? Just how major is this and will it have a major impact on the fall muskie fishing?

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I'm sorry I meant C&R only during the summer for Muskie not close the lake. Last year when it was a lot hotter than this year I fished Fellows at least every week during the summer and didn't see any dead Muskie.........My biggest concern were the Muskies that grabbed Bluegill I had on 4lb line and of swallowed the bluegill and jig and broke the line.............

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Is this true for all big fish?

This is not true for all big fish, other species do substantially better in warm water conditions as they are warm water species. With that being said catch and release success depends on all species being properly revived after a long battle, it's just the ethical thing to do. It's all about the large body size, the amount of dissolved oxygen content, lactic acid, all species suffer.....literally.

Musky are big, muscled fish, big shoulders persay, they prefer cooler waters, they are non-native in our area, they are just not suited for these high water temps.

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I doubt if muskie fishing in Missouri would ever go to catch and release. However, I feel there may be some support for the size limit to be raised. I would like to see the limit set at 45", especially if there are a lot of low 40" muskies found in the lake.

I can never see the lake being closed to fishing during summer. I don't know of any lake that does that. However, a good deal of muskie fishermen in other states stop fishing for muskies when the water surface temperatures reach 80. I'm not sure how I feel about that, but I do feel there should be some emphasis on educating others on proper handling and releasing muskies for another day. The proper handling is not only for releasing the muskie, but for safety too.

Are there any recent reports on the condition of the water and what impact it is having on the muskies? Are more muskies being found floating? Just how major is this and will it have a major impact on the fall muskie fishing?

Fish are still being caught, we are still losing fish....even the folks that make their living off that lake are still harvesting fish. Will this be detrimental to the Fall fishing, you be the judge.

I have never stepped on the toes of those who wish to harvest a legally caught fish, if you wish to do that, by all means you have the right. The problem that I have is anglers who still chase these fish just for the catch....the catch and release anglers.

My thoughts are just that my thoughts......if I can preserve a few trophy fish with my posts and help to aid the fishery in any way then my posts and/or rants are in fact a success.

Facts.....Musky are not a naturally reproducing resource in Missouri, protect them....educate, close fishing in July and August (We are not Wisconsin), increase size limit to 45" (36" are trophies, but a 45" fish is a monster, this lake can produce them, if we let them grow.....

"Most" musky anglers stop fishing these giants when the water temps increase, even in our northern states......why? To preserve their fisheries.

Musky are easily caught right now....why exploit the resource? Fact is Musky are big fish that equals lots of O2, they are in the weeds for the oxygen, not for our disposal.....literally!

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Fish caught Wednesday and supposedly released (swam away after being caught, this fish was hooked, fought, held, transported to the marina, photographed, then revived, then released.............that's a lot of stress put on a 36" fish) This is the behavior that needs to stop, bottom line.....

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Fish caught Wednesday and supposedly released (swam away after being caught, this fish was hooked, fought, held, transported to the marina, photographed, then revived, then released.............that's a lot of stress put on a 36" fish) This is the behavior that needs to stop, bottom line.....

I am no Musky Angler though every so often I may go try. But educate me if the above statement is correct why should it be stopped. The fish was Caught and Released alive apparently so I see nothing wrong. Explain to me why if it is possible to do it should be stopped?

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I am no Musky Angler though every so often I may go try. But educate me if the above statement is correct why should it be stopped. The fish was Caught and Released alive apparently so I see nothing wrong. Explain to me why if it is possible to do it should be stopped?

The more the muskie is handled the more slim or skin protection is lost. Then, there is the amount of time the muskie is out of the water. The stress is a lot, but it is especially hard on muskies in hot weather. At least the muskie wasn't held vertically, which is suppose to be hard on them.

And, while a 36" muskie is big to some, it is actually considered just a muskie by most muskie fishermen. Some wouldn't even take the time to measure one that size. I probably would measure it unless it had been out of the water some time or it looked to be worn out from fighting. However, during hot water temperatures I would want to get the muskie back into the water as fast as I can.

Actually, I am trying to remove the lure hooks while the muskie is in the net along the side of the boat.

Obviously, this thread should help the conservation department realize that there needs to be some education on proper handling and releasing a muskie.

Hopefully, the marina will be educated as well so they can better inform others how important it is to the lake's population and growth.

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I am no Musky Angler though every so often I may go try. But educate me if the above statement is correct why should it be stopped. The fish was Caught and Released alive apparently so I see nothing wrong. Explain to me why if it is possible to do it should be stopped?

Studies have shown that muskies caught in hot water have been released only to die days later. A sad fate for a fish that we cherish. When a Musky is hooked and subsequently fought as the fish fights their lactic acid levels begin to build in their muscle tissue. The longer that fight lasts, the higher the level of lactic acid. Once that level of lactic acid reaches a certain point, the fish will never recover. The fish will often released looking healthy, however, an hour or two later or even 1-2 days later - they are floating inverted on the top of the water. This is even more important on hot days or when fishing warm water lakes. The warmer the water, the less oxygen readily available to the Musky.

This fish was stressed beyond a reasonable limit, in hot weather, in water temperature approximately 84-86 degrees.......did we lose a trophy fish? I am not able to tell you that, did the fish appear to swim away fine.........supposedly, did the fish go belly up 1-2 days later.......scientific research has proved that it could possibly happen and does on a regular basis in these conditions.

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The more the muskie is handled the more slim or skin protection is lost. Then, there is the amount of time the muskie is out of the water. The stress is a lot, but it is especially hard on muskies in hot weather. At least the muskie wasn't held vertically, which is suppose to be hard on them.

And, while a 36" muskie is big to some, it is actually considered just a muskie by most muskie fishermen. Some wouldn't even take the time to measure one that size. I probably would measure it unless it had been out of the water some time or it looked to be worn out from fighting. However, during hot water temperatures I would want to get the muskie back into the water as fast as I can.

Actually, I am trying to remove the lure hooks while the muskie is in the net along the side of the boat.

Obviously, this thread should help the conservation department realize that there needs to be some education on proper handling and releasing a muskie.

Hopefully, the marina will be educated as well so they can better inform others how important it is to the lake's population and growth.

Thanks for speaking up Bob, I appreciate it.

Even in cooler weather, keep the fish in the water as much as possible.....be ready for pictures when the fish is taken from the water and place the fish immediately back in the water.

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