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Night Fishing Striper in Jan/Feb.

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A friend of mine recently reminded me of a TV show we saw where they were on Beaver Lake at night in either Jan/Feb fishing for striper. They where throwing rouges and large crank baits and where catching some nice fish. Has anyone else heard of this, and if so what are some of the other techniques that go along with this. What part of the lake, what type of structure, etc. I do remember that they where just casting out the rouges and reeling them in very slow and steady. Any help would be great, thanks

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Jay,

I haven't heard of such a thing nor tried it that early in the year but I imagine it could be done. I usually start heading down there in March and April and throwing 1 oz rattle traps. Its a hoot! And to boot the only time we have ever caught them was after the sun goes down. They move up onto the points and into the tops of those big arsed submerged trees. We fish mainly around the darn and that area. If you know of anything happening down there early as you mentioned let me know. I'd love to get down there and give it a whirl in January or February.

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Guest flyfishBDS

Hey guys,

Most of the fly rod attempts Ive had have started in winter. Stripers are a nocturnal feeder so fishing at night, dawn dusk makes sense.

With the lake so low you will have to really know where you are going, not a place to be running wide open at night at the moment. Very least a good way to ruin a lower unit.

I have heard via one of our customers of finding stripers feeding on top at this end of the lake, early morning, in January. So they are aout there, just got to be int he right place at the right time, which means time on the water.

Wouldn't midn a crack at them myself.

Cheers

Steve

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Hey guys,

Most of the fly rod attempts Ive had have started in winter. Stripers are a nocturnal feeder so fishing at night, dawn dusk makes sense.

With the lake so low you will have to really know where you are going, not a place to be running wide open at night at the moment. Very least a good way to ruin a lower unit.

I have heard via one of our customers of finding stripers feeding on top at this end of the lake, early morning, in January. So they are aout there, just got to be int he right place at the right time, which means time on the water.

Wouldn't midn a crack at them myself.

Cheers

Steve

That is the only thing holding me back is the low water for night fishing at this time. One lower unit repair a year is enough. I have also heard about Striper making a false run up into the creeks in early spring is that true?

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That is the only thing holding me back is the low water for night fishing at this time. One lower unit repair a year is enough. I have also heard about Striper making a false run up into the creeks in early spring is that true?

Jay,

What do you mean by "false run"?

Are you referring to their attempt at a spawning run, or times when they move into the river prior to a spawning run?

All 3 of the Striper Family members (stripers, hybrids and whites) congregate (called "staging") near the tributary mouths for some weeks prior to ascending the rivers in the reproductive mode.

However, they are known to run up into the rivers (usually at night or dark rainy days) for brief times to feed and return to the lake and that is sometimes referred to as a false run. All 3 species are known to do this.

The other "false run" you might be referring to is the fact that the stripers and hybrids don't successfully reproduce when they go through the spawning process in the Beaver Lake fishery. Stripers need an average of about 80 miles of free-flowing river for their neutral-bouyancy eggs to drift and hatch.

Hybrids are sexually fertile though normally thought of as sterile, and there are some limited reports (fisheries biologists) of successful reproduction in AR, SC and TX.

White bass obviously do reproduce there, and practically everywhere they are found, and are known as perhaps the closest thing to a perfect gamefish from a fisheries biologist perspective (no hatchery, no stocking, great fighter, very prolific.....kinda like rabbits).

Probably more than you wanted to know.

They are definitely worth your time and attention in the spring.

Lots of factors affect their movement and therefore your chances of success, so I would suggest you keep in close touch with local fishing shops for the latest info (daily updates).

Hope this is helpful.

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Jay,

What do you mean by "false run"?

Are you referring to their attempt at a spawning run, or times when they move into the river prior to a spawning run?

All 3 of the Striper Family members (stripers, hybrids and whites) congregate (called "staging") near the tributary mouths for some weeks prior to ascending the rivers in the reproductive mode.

However, they are known to run up into the rivers (usually at night or dark rainy days) for brief times to feed and return to the lake and that is sometimes referred to as a false run. All 3 species are known to do this.

The other "false run" you might be referring to is the fact that the stripers and hybrids don't successfully reproduce when they go through the spawning process in the Beaver Lake fishery. Stripers need an average of about 80 miles of free-flowing river for their neutral-bouyancy eggs to drift and hatch.

Hybrids are sexually fertile though normally thought of as sterile, and there are some limited reports (fisheries biologists) of successful reproduction in AR, SC and TX.

White bass obviously do reproduce there, and practically everywhere they are found, and are known as perhaps the closest thing to a perfect gamefish from a fisheries biologist perspective (no hatchery, no stocking, great fighter, very prolific.....kinda like rabbits).

Probably more than you wanted to know.

They are definitely worth your time and attention in the spring.

Lots of factors affect their movement and therefore your chances of success, so I would suggest you keep in close touch with local fishing shops for the latest info (daily updates).

Hope this is helpful.

I was referring like you said that Striper/hybrids do not reproduce in Beaver lake. ( as far as I know). I was wondering if they follow there cousins ( white bass) at about the same time, or do they go earlier in the year up the rivers and creeks. I have seen guides post different prices this time of year for lake fishing or a creek arm run. Thanks again for the information that every one puts down I am learning a lot. I hope as the season progresses even more people will post there reports/information. It really helps to narrow down area/technique for these fish when you are only able to go once a week at the most.

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I was referring like you said that Striper/hybrids do not reproduce in Beaver lake. ( as far as I know). I was wondering if they follow there cousins ( white bass) at about the same time, or do they go earlier in the year up the rivers and creeks. I have seen guides post different prices this time of year for lake fishing or a creek arm run. Thanks again for the information that every one puts down I am learning a lot. I hope as the season progresses even more people will post there reports/information. It really helps to narrow down area/technique for these fish when you are only able to go once a week at the most.

jay,

White Bass stage at the river mouths then ascend the rivers to spawn in a progressive manner over several weeks. I've always assumed the schools of whites that resided in the upper end of the lake were the earliest and those from the lowest part of the lake (in the area of the Dam) were last. It's logical but I don't know if it's fact.

In every fishery I've experienced, the Hybrids begin showing up in the rivers with the Whites near the tail end of the Whites' run. Additionally, about every Striper I've caught in lake tributaries in the spring were mixed in with Hybrids.

Keep in mind that you might find any or all 3 of these in the tribs, prior to their spawning ritual or even later in the year, for very short periods of time (hours to a few days) for the sole purpose of feeding.

The best thing you can do is keep in close touch with the shops that keep up with daily conditions, reports and fish the rivers themselves. You might find some others, but I would suggest Todd and Michael at McLellans Fly Shop in Fayetteville and Steve at the Beaver Dam Store.

From about late February thru at least mid-May the key is to network, network, network!!!

Good luck this spring.

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jay,

White Bass stage at the river mouths then ascend the rivers to spawn in a progressive manner over several weeks. I've always assumed the schools of whites that resided in the upper end of the lake were the earliest and those from the lowest part of the lake (in the area of the Dam) were last. It's logical but I don't know if it's fact.

In every fishery I've experienced, the Hybrids begin showing up in the rivers with the Whites near the tail end of the Whites' run. Additionally, about every Striper I've caught in lake tributaries in the spring were mixed in with Hybrids.

Keep in mind that you might find any or all 3 of these in the tribs, prior to their spawning ritual or even later in the year, for very short periods of time (hours to a few days) for the sole purpose of feeding.

The best thing you can do is keep in close touch with the shops that keep up with daily conditions, reports and fish the rivers themselves. You might find some others, but I would suggest Todd and Michael at McLellans Fly Shop in Fayetteville and Steve at the Beaver Dam Store.

From about late February thru at least mid-May the key is to network, network, network!!!

Good luck this spring.

Thanks Bill I am just trying to find a way to start my Striper/Hybrid fishing early this year, and I plan on putting my reports on this wed site and hope others will to.

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:ph34r: ...... saw some rolling the surface near the blue springs bridge, on the river side, the past two mornings at day break as i drive past!!

Hey bobber, you sure those weren't Carp. This Kansas farmer has been coming down to Beaver to catch stripers and I don't think you have any in the whole darn lake. 3 years ago I came down and went out twice with Don Andreason, never boated a fish. 2 years ago came again and went out with Don. Boated 1 fish about 8 lbs. Gave up on Don so last year came down and went out with Big Dog for 2 different days. He didn't boat a fish either.

You sure all those Striper stories aren't just Arkansas old wives tales? It's been fun trying but sure should like to hang one on the wall. Any ideas.

Mike Smalley

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