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White or green lights for night fishing???

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I see most night fishing lights produced now are green. I have had good luck with the green in saltwater but not so sure if they are the ticket on Beaver. I have an older bass pro fluorescent tube in green that still works, but many of the newer LED lights seem to be much brighter. Just not sure if I should buy a new white or green.  Any suggestions?

Is the main target of night fishing for white bass?  I suppose it depends on where you anchor as to what fish you catch.

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I have not done much of it, but have caught mostly crappie, but striper, walleye and even catfish have hit me under lights. I have always used white, but I see a lot of green glows under boats at night. Almost hit one one night that no other lights and did not identify the green glow with a boat until it was almost too late.

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Wondering about getting a new led green or white myself. I'm still using the old floating headlight. Must be 30 years old. Sucks the life out of a battery way to fast.

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I've heard mixed results.  Depends on who you talk to.  Considering the water is now green (finally), a green light will not throw as much light as a white light.  Probably a minor difference and lets face it, light is light when it's dark.  Fish will be attracted to it.

I honestly do not know which works better but I would go with a low draw light to prevent battery draw. An LED light would be great.

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5 hours ago, J-Doc said:

I've heard mixed results.  Depends on who you talk to.  Considering the water is now green (finally), a green light will not throw as much light as a white light.  Probably a minor difference and lets face it, light is light when it's dark.  Fish will be attracted to it.

I honestly do not know which works better but I would go with a low draw light to prevent battery draw. An LED light would be great.

I think the question here is how many leds do you need, I have used the floating car lamps for under $10. But now there are 30, 90, 180 leds and you can sink anywhere from $20 to $300 in a light. How much and what color of leds are needed and make a difference.

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The color of the lights has to do with light refraction / penetration. For the visible spectrum violet, blue and green penetrate further, blue the deepest.  If you  scuba dive you know that the deeper you go everything starts looking green/blue, but hit it with light and you will see vivid color. 

White light contains all colors of the spectrum- not just a concentrated wavelength- so it works but it won't look as bright deeper.  I made a green and a blue submersible led light this winter that I plan to use, I'll let you know if one seems to outperform the other. 

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I was gonna say the same thing as Pigsooner said above. It's about light wavelength. Green penetrates deeper than white. Too much white light can spook bigger game fish as they like to hide in the "shadow" of the light. So if you go with green, you can shine deeper with less "brightness" (if that makes sense) and the bigger fish tend to come much closer. In theory anyways.

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