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bkbying89

Sand everywhere.

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Everything you have all posted makes a great deal of sense. Especially Al's remarks about the savannahs and Mark's about the pinewoods. The bedrock in the streams, yes I know of a small stream that has areas of bedrock exposed. This has turned out to be a very informative learning experience for me. Thanks, everyone. If you have anything to add I would like to hear it. What books do you suggest on the history of Missouri that would cover this subject?

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2 hours ago, Mark said:

Read the Schoolcraft account of exploring the Ozarks if you haven't already. He paints as good of picture as Al, pun intended:)

It's a great read and you can get a free pdf online. 

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35 minutes ago, moguy1973 said:

Link?

https://archive.org/details/Henry_Schoolcrafts_1818_Ozark_Journal

 

I printed out a copy put it in a binder then read it while staying in a cabin on Buffalo River a few years back. I would recommend having a copy of the Missouri and Arkansas Gazetteer with you so you can track his path.

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7 hours ago, Greasy B said:

https://archive.org/details/Henry_Schoolcrafts_1818_Ozark_Journal

 

I printed out a copy put it in a binder then read it while staying in a cabin on Buffalo River a few years back. I would recommend having a copy of the Missouri and Arkansas Gazetteer with you so you can track his path.

I looked it up and read some of it (a synopsis) from a book about the journey and was surprised. It seems most of Missouri was a savannah interspersed.with forest. I always thought that the plains started at the Kansas border. I still have more to read. Thanks for the link.

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The sand is always there, it gets mixed in with organic soil and looks like dirt.  When it gets stirred up in turbulent water, the lighter organics float off and the heavier sand settles out.  The clay floats off too, that is what makes all of the muddy water.

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4 hours ago, Gavin said:

Schoolcraft's travels are worth a read. Has a County in MI named in his honor too. Worth a visit.

 

Michigan native and summer time resident still I did not know that. One of the many reasons I get up in the morning, learn something new every day!

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THIS IS AN EXCELLENT

On youtube, the lectures from a freshman level class at Missouri Sate U entitled "OZK 150: Introduction to Ozark Studies by Dr. Blevins. There are 30 lectures of :50. Lecture 1: The Where and What of the Ozarks. Very interesting and Dr. Blevins is an awesome lecturer. I watched about the first t2 or so that takes history up to the early 1800s, my main interest, and just never got back to the rest. But one lecture covers Native Indians, one French arrival, another on venicular, - starts every lecture with Ozark Vocabulary Words of the Day - pretty funny!!

This blew me away - He kids that the area should be called The Ozark Valleys instead of the Ozark Mts., as every hill is formed from erosion. The only true mountains with evidence of volcanic activity (which defines a true mountain) is the St. Francois Mts. specifically Elephant Rocks of granite. Missouri was a flat marsh at one time.

I may post this under General Discussion so more people see it. Hope you all will enjoy.

 

 

 

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