Jump to content
OzarkAnglers.Com Forum

Recommended Posts

I am about to write a research paper on the topic of dam removal and the environmental and recreational effects of such activity. Anyone that has been near Taneycomo or other tailwaters knows that dams not only provide hydroelectric power but also wonderful recreational opportunities. My topic of dam removals more-so is aimed at smaller scaled projects and more specifically ones affecting migratory species such as Pacific salmon and other anadromous species. Dams (large or small) that have been removed which previously blocked the natural passage of these fish not only reintroduces that opportunity but also reestablishes a wide array of environmental rehabilitation.

 

I know it's a long shot but I'm just curious if anybody has experience/viewpoints/comments on this topic. 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ozarks Chillbilly said:

...I know it's a long shot but I'm just curious if anybody has experience/viewpoints/comments on this topic. 

Thanks!

I have no experience and unsettled viewpoints. Comments I'm full of (among other stuff).

American Rivers has a bundle of info to help in your quest, including a list of the hundreds (surprise to me) of US dams removed since '99. Good luck!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/american-rivers-website/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/15104536/DamsRemoved_1999-2016.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dams are many and varied.  Some can be removed with little ill effect, others are big enough or important enough that any talk of removal is nothing more than an acrademic exercise, which isn't a completely bad thing.  The academic exercise can shed some light and viewpoints on a very touchy subject.  I will limit my comments to some of the smaller .  The biggest hurdle for most dam removals will be the cost and size of the project, it is very expensive and requires a variety of permits or blessings from agencies depending on the location. Something that occasionally come up with dam removals is the sudden release of the accumulated silt, mud and or gravel.  While it obviously doesn't come down like an avalanche there could well be a variety of pollutants or contaminants trapped in that material. It is an interesting topic for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, MOPanfisher said:

Dams are many and varied.  Some can be removed with little ill effect, others are big enough or important enough that any talk of removal is nothing more than an acrademic exercise, which isn't a completely bad thing.  The academic exercise can shed some light and viewpoints on a very touchy subject.  I will limit my comments to some of the smaller .  The biggest hurdle for most dam removals will be the cost and size of the project, it is very expensive and requires a variety of permits or blessings from agencies depending on the location. Something that occasionally come up with dam removals is the sudden release of the accumulated silt, mud and or gravel.  While it obviously doesn't come down like an avalanche there could well be a variety of pollutants or contaminants trapped in that material. It is an interesting topic for me.

Thanks for your input! While I haven't started my official 'research yet;  I have also found lots of information about the release of accumulated materials whether they be from the construction on the dam or from natural silts. I will have to explore this phenomena  in more detail as it will surely make its way into my paper. It's interesting factor because this alone could make it unethical or result in one stop forward, two steps back within the mission to  restore the downstream environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.