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Dustin.Sellers

Better Luck Next Time

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9 hours ago, Dustin.Sellers said:

 The first test was only a few hundred yards after I put in at Riddle Bridge.  I'm sure most of you know what I'm talking about.

Once you go under that bridge there is a big hard left turn and a pretty deep bluff hole a few hundred yards down...yikes!

A funny story a few years back. Al Agnew, Jeremy, and I were in my jet boat right at the Riddle bridge ramp. It's always a popular hang out for Pulaski County's "finest" folks. There was a big old gal holding a baby standing in waist deep water and The baby was not wearing a life jacket. All the sudden we heard a scream and the lady had dropped her baby in the water. it took a couple of seconds for her to find the baby and pull it out of the water. Of course, the baby was crying loudly. The father comes rushing over to look the kid over and said..."He aint hurt!,  he's just more scared than anything!"

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Agree dry bags and a bunge on the cooler.  How did two bottles of whiskey fall out? Pounding it two fisted with it on deck;)! Glad your OK. Surprised you did not paddle back to the put in. Secure your car keys, phone, first aid & emergency clothes & supplies in a dry bag. Always. 

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Yep...you can be a little more relaxed on smaller creeks in the middle of summer, but this time of year, you'd better be over-prepared for mishaps, especially on a river big enough that you might run into trouble in water that's deeper than your knees.  Everything essential in dry storage that can't come open and floats.  There are two different schools of thought on whether to tie stuff in or keep it in floating waterproof bags or containers and salvage it after you get out of trouble.  On one hand, it's more difficult to get your boat out from under a big log if all your stuff is tied in.  On the other, it's sometimes pretty difficult to catch up to and find all your floating containers bobbing down the river.  I don't tie most of my stuff in, but might tie in the essentials.

And Mitch, in the Pulaski County dialect, the comment was, as the guy that was maybe or maybe not the father lifted the baby out of the water by one leg while holding his beer with the other hand, "Ah, he's okay, jist a little skeered is all."

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Thankfully I put everything I needed to survive inside the hull of the kayak.  So it all stayed dry.  Spare clothes, food, cooking system, and my sleeping system.  Just the things that I bring along for a good time plastic bottle whiskey, fishing tackle, cellphone for a potential monster bronzeback photo op, etc. were lost.  But, those things were expensive.  I'll definitely be investing in some dry bags for good measure inside the hull and a floating/waterproof case for cellphone, keys, and wallet.  I can't afford to keep replacing things.  I look forward to getting on the river again.  Next year I'll give it another attempt.  Hopefully this time with better results. 

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Dry bags and boxes are not all their cracked up to be. I've been using duffle bags with trash bag liners for long time without a problem. 

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On ‎10‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 9:47 AM, Dustin.Sellers said:


-Bottle of whiskey

-Bottle of whiskey
 

Other than the spill the trip wasn't too bad.  A bit cold Friday night.  But, the beauty of that river made up for it all.  Absolutely gorgeous and the trees were at the perfect part of their color change.  I'd liked to have gotten to fish, or drink, or both.  But, I'll be returning to the Gasconade next year.  To look for some of my things, and to see what fish it holds. 

"Wasn't too bad" my butt!  You had to go through the float sober.  Just thinking about it gives me the shakes.

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I don't know what it was about that first turn and that tree but it almost got me too.  I was weighed down pretty good with camping gear and a a cooler in my kayak too and for some reason it wasn't ferrying like it should have been and the current wasn't turning the nose of my kayak away from that tree.  I took that thing head on and it spun me sideways up against it and it almost made me take on water real fast.  I was able to grab the trunk with my hand and push off before it flipped me though and I just had to empty some water out of my buttwell.  I did manage to break one of the micro guides off a rod that got hung up in the tree though.

 

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