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Dutch

Where do you look???

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I have some land in Stone County and am always having someone ask if they can hunt shrooms on it.  I'm not willing to just turn them loose on it but wouldn't mind having them look if I had an Idea of where they might find some.  It has a spring that runs all the way through it and a couple of sloughs.  Do they grow around low damp spots of on more hilly ground?

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I am not a great mushroom hunter, mostly find them by accident; but I believe you find them where you look most often.  I've seen them in a lot of places that don't match the accepted wisdom.  Ridge tops far from trees, by many kinds of trees, on hillsides too steep to stand on, in gravel ditch,  in a yard in town, in pine forest, in oak forest, in an orchard etc. and in all the years of blundering onto them I have yet to find a morel within 10 yards of any elm- yet elms are where many people look exclusively. I have noticed that I often find morels near squirrel trees, I'm not sure if that is because squirrels plant them there or if the squirrel traffic keeps the leaves rolled back making it easier to spot the mush room or if my eyes just focus better on larger trees.

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1 hour ago, tjm said:

I am not a great mushroom hunter, mostly find them by accident; but I believe you find them where you look most often.  I've seen them in a lot of places that don't match the accepted wisdom.  Ridge tops far from trees, by many kinds of trees, on hillsides too steep to stand on, in gravel ditch,  in a yard in town, in pine forest, in oak forest, in an orchard etc. and in all the years of blundering onto them I have yet to find a morel within 10 yards of any elm- yet elms are where many people look exclusively. I have noticed that I often find morels near squirrel trees, I'm not sure if that is because squirrels plant them there or if the squirrel traffic keeps the leaves rolled back making it easier to spot the mush room or if my eyes just focus better on larger trees.

 

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I've been hunting almost 40 years here in SWMO. I used to only hunt 1 type of area, sycamore trees. After I opened my mind,  I realized they can be found anywhere.  However there are some places that are overwhelmingly better than others. Here's my list of my best places to look.                                                   Sycamore trees which are not in a major river bottom.  It seems the best trees are in well drained area's.  Especially at the head of a ditch.                   Dead elm trees. But then it's only a small percentage of them that will grow mushrooms.  And they have to be recently dead with the bark just starting to peel off.  They're generally a 1 and done spot, only producing once. But if you find 1, you'll find 30.                                   Ash trees are another good place to look.  However most times they just have a few at best. I did find 22 at an ash tree this year which was a surprise.       Oak trees on a north facing hill and almost always will be on the lower end of the tree. It seems the steeper the hill, the better chance of finding some.                 Cedar glades on real wet years.  My best seasons are this type of year. I'll find 3 times a normal year but it's a rare occurrence.  Usually right where the water comes  seeping off the hill at a bluff line and below.                                         With all this said, you can find them randomly at any place at times. I've found them on rocks, logs, in junk piles, even got 1 in a styrofoam cooler. 

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12 hours ago, Dutch said:

I have some land in Stone County and am always having someone ask if they can hunt shrooms on it.  I'm not willing to just turn them loose on it but wouldn't mind having them look if I had an Idea of where they might find some.  It has a spring that runs all the way through it and a couple of sloughs.  Do they grow around low damp spots of on more hilly ground?

I’ve come to believe you just need to get out in the woods and look. They’ll orient to trees, both alive and dead. Moist soil with lots of organic matter around is best. Avoid areas with rocky soil or thick, woody underbrush. I’d recommend not worrying too much about specific trees. Put in the time and you’ll find some. 

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Just get out. Wear tick /bug dope. Get a good mushroom stick!!!!  This is a necessary.   When you find one freeze.  360 and look very close.  They will be there.  My 20 year old stick has a fork on the end.  It flips leaves, bark and pins snakes. One of my prized possessions.   Just clear your eyes and it will happen. They sneak up on you!!!!!!

 

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2 hours ago, Deadstream said:

Just get out. Wear tick /bug dope. Get a good mushroom stick!!!!  This is a necessary.   When you find one freeze.  360 and look very close.  They will be there.  My 20 year old stick has a fork on the end.  It flips leaves, bark and pins snakes. One of my prized possessions.   Just clear your eyes and it will happen. They sneak up on you!!!!!!

 

Probably the best advise ever.  

Or just drop 4.00 on a bucket of portabella's and spend the rest of the day doing something else you enjoy more than looking for a wine cork in a wood chipper.  🤣

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