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Phil Lilley

Catch a State Record Fish? Then What?

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Personally, I'd have a hard time hauling in a potential record - it all depends on the circumstances.  If it was clear it would kill the fish... I don't know.  I get real funny when I'm worried about a big fish's health... I can't help it.

Everything was working well with Bill's catch.  It didn't fight long and hard.  He got it back to the dock quickly and it was swimming on its own in the tank.  Everybody was excited because they knew it should be weighed and released.

 

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I am sure that water temps, air temps and DO have everything to do with survival odds. But like IGFA told Bill, most caught records do not survive. I think Frank was the exception to the rule due to the circumstances I stated. Released or not , I think the fishery deserves the recognition of updated records.

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Others have pretty well summed up my opinion. I'd try my best to keep it alive while jumping through the hoops to get it certified. If you CPR 100 or 1000 trophy class fish in your life time and end up killing the fish of a life time while getting it certified for a record, you have nothing to hang your head in shame about. Fish of that caliber are more than likely towards the end of their life cycle anyways.

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This was a fish caught within the limits of the law; a genetically modified fish stocked in a man-made tail water. Extraordinary efforts were made to keep it alive so it could be released to be caught again, but it didn’t survive. Kudos to all involved. 

I wish it had survived, but I can’t  mourn its loss. 

Not to take away from the accomplishment, but this wasn’t a native wild trout, born in the river that beat the odds and survived in a difficult natural environment; one that passed its superior genes on to another generation, strengthening the species for the future. It was a stocker that likely grew obese eating the guts of other stockers.   

It was a nice catch. Records are what they are. Would have been nice to release it alive, but not a great loss that it died. 

 

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I’ve expressed my thoughts on records. The IGFA confirmed my thoughts with their ridiculous rule on the leader. But if I have what I think is a record I’m taking it in. There’s more benefit in taking it in for the fishery than just letting it go to possibly die after the release. I think Bill’s fish was dead as soon as he set the hook.  

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I recall hearing (from the inner circle) about one that MDC shocked up and killed at Taney that at the time would have beaten the state record by a long shot.  It didn't recover from the shock so they put a hush order on it, and swept it under the rug.   Anybody here know exactly how big that one was, and if it was a rainbow or a brown?   

I think that would be a good place to redirect the ones bellyaching about Mr. Bablers fish. 😊

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Ahh. Not native. Eating stuff that “pure trout “ don’t.  The Mark McGwire of trout. An insult to “natural “ fish everywhere.

Therefore,  I object. And, will never fish Taneycomo.  Imagine. Trout in Missouri living in a river below a dam. The very idea.

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9 hours ago, netboy said:

I would do exactly what Bill and your folks at Lilley's did. Catch it, try your best to keep it alive during the certification process and then release it. 

Based on the accounts of the catch and the relatively short struggle it put up that fish was probably at the end of it's life cycle anyway.

Since it was apparently a triploid it's genetics weren't removed from the "gene pool" .  

Once again... congrats to Bill and all your efforts at Lilley's.

Yep, pretty much the way I feel about it.

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6 hours ago, joeD said:

Ahh. Not native. Eating stuff that “pure trout “ don’t.  The Mark McGwire of trout. An insult to “natural “ fish everywhere.

Therefore,  I object. And, will never fish Taneycomo.  Imagine. Trout in Missouri living in a river below a dam. The very idea.

Nice!  One less guy crowding me in:D

Technically it's a lake below the dam.

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