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Civil war skirmish or camp near Montauk--any info?

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In an old thread  in the Montauk state park section (see below), I came across a couple references to a "civil war battlefield campground" out past the Eagle's park near the turn off toward Tan Vat. (this campground itself sounds like it was insubstantial, defunct, a remnant, etc.)

Anyone familiar with the local tradition? I haven't located any information about a skirmish or civil war campsite near the present park (at least not on the 'net). I'll check some books and old records later.    

The references are in this thread: http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/25084-helpwhere-to-camp/?tab=comments#comment-163203

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It was the battle of Inman Hollow. Its east of Tan Vat/Eagles Park  on YY, the  big flat hollow to the North East before you head up the hill to Baptist. Used to be a campground, but it was sold. The big green sign was still there.

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5 hours ago, Gavin said:

It was the battle of Inman Hollow. Its east of Tan Vat/Eagles Park  on YY, the  big flat hollow to the North East before you head up the hill to Baptist. Used to be a campground, but it was sold. The big green sign was still there.

Thank you, Gavin. I will hopefully be at Montauk this summer and might check it out. I can certainly do some research knowing the name.

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For anyone who might be interested, here is the official report of the Battle of Inman Hollow, July 7 1862. Since I understand Stevenson's Mill was in the present park boundaries (it was later burned and replaced), it sounds like Major Gallup led a detachment of the Third Missouri Cavalry right through the present park to the mouth of the hollow.  Then they went northeast up the hollow for three miles where they fought the battle.

One thing thats a little disturbing is the lack of wounded. In a typical battle there's normally four or five wounded for every man killed.  I have also run across a statement  written a few months later from a soldier at nearby Salem saying that company Q of the Third Missouri Cavalry kept the guerrillas in the area in "wholesome terror," and "rarely take prisoners." (This is in Inside War by Michael Fellman, p. 77).

Company Q is not listed as one that actually fought in the battle, but this still leaves me wondering if some atrocities might have occurred. There was a lot of that sort of thing in Missouri in the war. 

In any case, here's the official report and a link to the original source.

 

https://ehistory.osu.edu/books/official-records/019/0152

 

JULY 7, 1862.- Skirmish at Inman Hollow, Mo.

Report of Major Henry A. Gallup, Third Missouri Cavalry.

SIR: In pursuance of Special Orders, Numbers 21, from these headquarters, I took command of a detachment of 205 men of Companies B, D, G, and H, and proceeded to Crow's Station, arriving there at 1 a, m, on Sunday. The next morning I sent Company G, in charge of Sergeant Haines, with the wagons, direct to Salem, and proceeded with the other three companies to Stevenson's Mill, on the Current River, leaving a detachment of 15 men at Spring Creek, to reconnoiter and get such information as was to be obtained of the whereabouts of any rebel force that was in that vicinity. Monday morning, the 7th instant, I sent Lieutenant Avery back to Spring Creek with Company H, to go from that place to Salem, and proceeded down the river with the two remaining companies to the mouth of Inman Hollow.

Learning that several bands of rebels had been seen the night before about the head of this Hollow, and receiving information that there was a rebel camp, 200 strong, in that vicinity, I proceeded up the Hollow-searching closely for indications of an enemy. After proceeding about 3 miles 5 rebels were discovered getting corn from a barn on the road-side. Lieutenant Agnew, with the advance guard, drove them into the camp on the opposite side of the road, closely followed by Company B, Captain Glover commanding, charging the camp at full speed. The rebels fled precipitately, leaving coats, blankets, and arms on the ground. Owing to the distance at which they heard the firing from the house, they were flying in every direction when we arrived at their camp. We succeeded, however,, in killing 11, mortally wounding 1, and taking 1 prisoner, with several horses and mules. Their arms we were obliged to destroy, as we had no means of transportation. Two Hall's carbines, 1 German carbine, and 1 revolver pistol were saved. From Inman Hollow we marched to Salem, and encamped for the night.

On Tuesday morning I left Company H, with several horses of other companies, unable to travel for want of shoes, and proceeded direct to these headquarters, having directed Lieutenant Avery to proceed to this place on Wednesday following.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. A. GALLUP,

Major Third Missouri Cavalry.

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Very interesting, I had always wondered about that sign for Inman Hollow after driving by it multiple times in the past. I could never find any history online about it though. I think the green sign still stands, however "Inman Hollow" has been painted over. 

 

Does this Lieutenant Agnew have any relation to our Al Agnew? 

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21 hours ago, jfrith said:

Very interesting, I had always wondered about that sign for Inman Hollow after driving by it multiple times in the past. I could never find any history online about it though. I think the green sign still stands, however "Inman Hollow" has been painted over. 

 

Does this Lieutenant Agnew have any relation to our Al Agnew? 

Unfortunately, I don't know about Lt. Agnew aside from what's listed above.

 

Glad you enjoyed the info.  

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Mr. Williams, who ran the campground, had all kinds of stories about the battle, a collection of artifacts, and stone wall memorial on the property last time I stayed there. His health took a nose dive several years ago, so I doubt that he is still with us. I do not know the current owners, but you could stop and ask to look around politely.

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13 hours ago, Gavin said:

Mr. Williams, who ran the campground, had all kinds of stories about the battle, a collection of artifacts, and stone wall memorial on the property last time I stayed there. His health took a nose dive several years ago, so I doubt that he is still with us. I do not know the current owners, but you could stop and ask to look around politely.

It would be interesting to see and hear that if possible.  I was hoping to get to Montauk this summer for the first time, but that is obviously postponed indefinitely due to the virus. 

 

 

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Mr. W. was a great guy. Camped there years ago when I landed my first big trout. Great times in that campground. I miss it.

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On May 1, 2020 at 2:53 PM, Nortrad said:

Mr. W. was a great guy. Camped there years ago when I landed my first big trout. Great times in that campground. I miss it.

This is one thing about the trout parks. You get to know some nice folks. 

I had a similar thing going at a campground at Bennett Spring. Sadly for me, the owners sold the campground and moved to Florida for retirement last I heard. I was on good terms with them, and a number of the retirees there.

God bless 'em all, wherever they are.

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