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Bull Shoals is the primary lake I use, and there has been several high water ramp improvements in the last few years. TRL Is sort of the golden child, and that is what it is. Bull has the most storage, and if I recall right, the most hydropower capacity. It's gonna be the catch all, by design. I still think there has been a shift in the last decade or so in the amount of water being held for power reasons. Maybe it's just the minimum flow regs, but I suspect more. I don't even think it's bad, I just think the folks who are getting flooded by Taneycomo and the folks who don't have the same income in high water years as "normal" years should get a slice of the hydroelectric pie. 

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I agree there probably has been some degree of shift but I don't think its a large as its often made out to be. 

 

I can't remember a wetter sustained winter than the one we just went through(I'm not talking about a couple toad floater rains I'm talking continuous 1" rains). We never really got cold enough to freeze and I've been plowing through foot deep ruts all over the farm. I can't remember a year where it seemed to rain as much as last year. Lots of farmers had trouble finding 3-4 days of dry weather to put up hay last year between May and July. I cant remember the last time the dock on my small .3 acre pond actually wasn't floating and it only sets in 2' of water. 

 

Looking back was it 2006 or 2005? The last real bad drought(I'm talking months without real rain) with farmers feeding hay through the summer and people worried about ponds going dry?

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1 hour ago, Devan S. said:

I agree there probably has been some degree of shift but I don't think its a large as its often made out to be. 

 

I can't remember a wetter sustained winter than the one we just went through(I'm not talking about a couple toad floater rains I'm talking continuous 1" rains). We never really got cold enough to freeze and I've been plowing through foot deep ruts all over the farm. I can't remember a year where it seemed to rain as much as last year. Lots of farmers had trouble finding 3-4 days of dry weather to put up hay last year between May and July. I cant remember the last time the dock on my small .3 acre pond actually wasn't floating and it only sets in 2' of water. 

 

Looking back was it 2006 or 2005? The last real bad drought(I'm talking months without real rain) with farmers feeding hay through the summer and people worried about ponds going dry?

A really wet winter and the lake has been within 2 foot of full. It's not like it rains every spring, and you'll need storage to prevent that downstream flooding you were talking about.. Failed I say.

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17 minutes ago, dblades said:

A really wet winter and the lake has been within 2 foot of full. It's not like it rains every spring, and you'll need storage to prevent that downstream flooding you were talking about.. Failed I say.

In what world was any lake within the system within 2 foot of full directly prior to this last week of rain? 

March 17- Beaver was 1126.5, Table Rock was 917 and Bull Shoal was 662. 2 of the largest were within 2 ft. of normal and Beaver was being dumped prior to the start of the rain. 

Table rock hasn't been within 2 foot of "full" since 2017. Bull Shoals hasn't been that way since the middle of last year. Aggressively dumping every chance that conditions downstream would allow.  

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17 minutes ago, Devan S. said:

In what world was any lake within the system within 2 foot of full directly prior to this last week of rain? 

March 17- Beaver was 1126.5, Table Rock was 917 and Bull Shoal was 662. 2 of the largest were within 2 ft. of normal and Beaver was being dumped prior to the start of the rain. 

Table rock hasn't been within 2 foot of "full" since 2017. Bull Shoals hasn't been that way since the middle of last year. Aggressively dumping every chance that conditions downstream would allow.  

Really, every one of them were full pool according to these graphs, in January

http://tablerock.uslakes.info/Level/

 http://beaver.uslakes.info/level.asp

http://bullshoals.uslakes.info/Level/

I'm out.  😀

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9 minutes ago, dblades said:

Really, every one of them were full pool according to these graphs, in January

http://tablerock.uslakes.info/Level/

 http://beaver.uslakes.info/level.asp

http://bullshoals.uslakes.info/Level/

I'm out.  😀

You know what your right....If the definition of full is normal power pool. 

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6 hours ago, Devan S. said:

 

If you want to champion a good cause then we should be taking that money from generating and investing in infrastructure so that the lake is still widely accessible at the full rang of levels.

 

 

I second that motion.

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6 hours ago, mixermarkb said:

Bull Shoals is the primary lake I use, and there has been several high water ramp improvements in the last few years. TRL Is sort of the golden child, and that is what it is. Bull has the most storage, and if I recall right, the most hydropower capacity. It's gonna be the catch all, by design. I still think there has been a shift in the last decade or so in the amount of water being held for power reasons. Maybe it's just the minimum flow regs, but I suspect more. I don't even think it's bad, I just think the folks who are getting flooded by Taneycomo and the folks who don't have the same income in high water years as "normal" years should get a slice of the hydroelectric pie. 

I'm a taxpayer/owner of the facilities you're talking about.  I want a piece of that hydroelectric pie too.

Never mind, I already get one.

Don't change it to favor one group over another.  

Think MAN!!!

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1 hour ago, Quillback said:

I second that motion.

I nay it.

Capital improvements should come from general funds, as they become available.  From a guy who has long opposed earmarking in it's many forms.

 

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8 minutes ago, Terrierman said:

I nay it.

Capital improvements should come from general funds, as they become available.  From a guy who has long opposed earmarking in it's many forms.

 

It wouldn't matter. The corps doesn't take care of the stuff they have and are actively closing and restricting access already. 

 

Case in point- Kings River boat ramp, Viney Creek Recreation Area, high water parking lot ramp at Eagle Rock. 

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