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I suspect that some here may be familiar with Rich Line Boats.

I have a Rich Line canoe and am wanting to determine when it was made.  But, HIN searches have proven to be unsuccessful.  I believe I can decipher it, but I can't confirm it.  September, 1976 (76B)

APB0957XM76B

To complicate it "APB" does not match as the MIC for Rich Line boats:

RCH RICH LINE BOATS RICHLAND MFG. CO.

But, my canoe has the Rich Line medallion on the port side of the bow, and the HIN plate APB0957XM76B on the port side of the stern.

Also, on other forums I have seen people trying to identify their Rich Line boats, and they are posting "APB" HINs:

"Can anyone tell me what model richline I just bought? Hull ID # APB0078RM75E,"

 

 

 

 

 

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I found the answer as to why my '76 Model 15C Rich Line canoe has a HIN starting with APB:

Sales Manager, J. B. Appleby, left Rich Line in 1960 to found Appleby Boats. He later returned to buy the company in the 1970's and consolidated operations under the Appleby Boats brand.

http://www.fiberglassics.com/library/index.php?title=Rich_Line

 

 

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By the way, if you find an old aluminum Rich Line, and wonder if it's seaworthy, go for it.  My canoe is as solid as the day it was made.  A guy visiting the neighbor's the other day saw me coming in on the canal and said, "Wanna sell it?"

 

 

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Yessir, I've probably had between 20-30 of them over the years (taken in on trade) and I've never had to scrap one.  Now that I think about it I don't think I ever had to replace the transom wood in one, and I've had some from the late '50's which I think were the 1st or second year of production (earlier ones were Appleby).  

The wood on the seats is another story, replaced plenty of those.

They were the ORIGINAL fishing boats here at Lake O, every resort had a fleet of them, and there are still alot of them around.  Good boats as long as you stay on your seat, they aren't very nice to get up and move around in. 😅

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21 hours ago, fishinwrench said:

Yessir, I've probably had between 20-30 of them over the years (taken in on trade) and I've never had to scrap one.  Now that I think about it I don't think I ever had to replace the transom wood in one, and I've had some from the late '50's which I think were the 1st or second year of production (earlier ones were Appleby).  

The wood on the seats is another story, replaced plenty of those.

They were the ORIGINAL fishing boats here at Lake O, every resort had a fleet of them, and there are still alot of them around.  Good boats as long as you stay on your seat, they aren't very nice to get up and move around in. 😅

I posted the history previously, here:  http://www.fiberglassics.com/library/index.php?title=Rich_Line

Here's how the son of the founder explained it:

In the summer of 1952 my father, Gordon L. Schneider and I were standing on the dock at Hyde-Away-Cove at the Lake of the Ozarks watching a Lone Star crossing the lake. My dad commented that he could make an aluminum boat that would plane better than that. He was silent for a time. Then, he said, "George that is what we are going to build at that old Shell Pumping Station in Richland." I had no idea what a Shell Pumping Station was and I had never heard of Richland, Missouri.

On May 4 of 1953 the articles of incorporation with 8 members were filed by Gordon L. Schneider with the Secretary of State, State of Missouri. They were approved, creating Richland Manufacturing Company, on May 14, 1953. By August of 1953 we had moved from Independence, Missouri to Richland and I had seen the Shell Pumping Station which my dad was turning into a boat production plant. . . . 

The first Rich Lines were tested at the Lake of the Ozarks in the spring of 1954. By the fall of 1955 Rich Line aluminum fishing boats, runabouts, and houseboats were streaming off the production line at two shifts a day, five days a week. The Governor of Illinois purchased one of the houseboats. By early 1956, 6,000 Rich Lines had been sold. . . . 

My dad sold the company in 1957. Richland Manufacturing continued making boats another 21 years. They also purchased Sea Fury and Tom Sawyer Boats for an early fiberglass line. The Rich Line name continued until 2003. 

Up until Appleby was the builder, the Rich Line MIC was:   RCH RICH LINE BOATS RICHLAND MFG. CO. 

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Not just at LOZ, Bull Shoals had a ton of those Rich Lines, still does really. My Dad and I inherited an old (69 if I remember right) 14' rich line tri-hull glass boat from my Uncle when he passed away. 75 horse Chrysler pushed it pretty well, even without power trim. Never mind the fact that I had to crawl up on the front deck to get it to plane off. We darn near rattled it apart trying to get in from a storm on Mark Twain Lake. Dad finally gave in and bought our first Champion that February. I'm pretty sure he did it just for safety, because that old Rich Line didn't inspire a lot of confidence... LOL    

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