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I watched a video and it was said “when landing a fish that was caught in deep water (35 + feet) If you release the fish right away there is no concerns regarding fizzing the air bladder“ . This does not sound right, I was under the impression the effect on its air bladder had more to do with how fast you brought the fish to the surface..  Now I am a bit confused. Looking back, I recall occasionally  seeing fish trying to swim upside down.. I suppose a nice guy would have rendered aid with a fizzing tool..

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That whole process never made any sense to me.  

How can something under water immediately take in extra air?  Or does it take the air in as soon as you lift it out of the water.    If the fish isn't lifted out of the water then does that keep the bladder from ingesting air?   

How are saltwater fish caught 60+ feet deep not affected in the same way?   

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8 minutes ago, fishinwrench said:

That whole process never made any sense to me.  

How can something under water immediately take in extra air?  Or does it take the air in as soon as you lift it out of the water.    If the fish isn't lifted out of the water then does that keep the bladder from ingesting air?   

How are saltwater fish caught 60+ feet deep not affected in the same way?   

Interesting.. Never the less, I am going to start fishing deeper waters (See if I can find them, cause im bored.)

Fish Tiny0927171505_HDR~2.jpg

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14 minutes ago, fishinwrench said:

That whole process never made any sense to me.  

How can something under water immediately take in extra air?  Or does it take the air in as soon as you lift it out of the water.    If the fish isn't lifted out of the water then does that keep the bladder from ingesting air?   

How are saltwater fish caught 60+ feet deep not affected in the same way?   

           Some are. Seen where bringing them up air bladder or something actually sticking out of the fishes mouth. 

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Deeper water has more pressure.  Gas particles compress when exposed to high pressure.  So, the gas contained within the air bladder expands as the pressure decreases as the fish is brought to the surface which expands the gas bladder. Some fish can expel the air quickly, others cannot. Salt/freshwater does not make a difference. 

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24 minutes ago, BilletHead said:

           Some are. Seen where bringing them up air bladder or something actually sticking out of the fishes mouth. 

Yep, used to catch what they called bottom fish in Puget Sound in deep water, bladders would be out of their mouths.

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1 hour ago, siusaluki said:

Deeper water has more pressure.  Gas particles compress when exposed to high pressure.  So, the gas contained within the air bladder expands as the pressure decreases as the fish is brought to the surface which expands the gas bladder. Some fish can expel the air quickly, others cannot. Salt/freshwater does not make a difference. 

Perfect. Exactly why you constantly release "breath" if you have to bail at depth while SCUBA diving. 

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To answer your question on how speed plays a factor in it. I think there is 2 schools of thought:

1. release as soon as possible and hope the fish still has the strength to swim down against their air bladder. Assuming they are strong enough to swim against the inflated bladder and can get to depth fast enough it will remedy their problem. It might be like you and I trying to fight against maybe a pool noodle....At first you may be able to get it down but if you cant after awhile you just die from fighting it in low oxygen water. 

2. Haul them around in improved condition water with clips on the fins to keep them upright until the air naturally has time to equalize to the lower pressure and then release them. Again this entirely dependent on having good water. 

Outside of that it is fizz them or people sometimes put them in an upside down weighted clothes basket and send em back down. 

 

Also the speed with which they are brought up plays a factor too. The faster they come up the less time they have to adjust themselves......the slower the better job they can do on their own.

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8 minutes ago, Devan S. said:

To answer your question on how speed plays a factor in it. I think there is 2 schools of thought:

1. release as soon as possible and hope the fish still has the strength to swim down against their air bladder. Assuming they are strong enough to swim against the inflated bladder and can get to depth fast enough it will remedy their problem. It might be like you and I trying to fight against maybe a pool noodle....At first you may be able to get it down but if you cant after awhile you just die from fighting it in low oxygen water. 

2. Haul them around in improved condition water with clips on the fins to keep them upright until the air naturally has time to equalize to the lower pressure and then release them. Again this entirely dependent on having good water. 

Outside of that it is fizz them or people sometimes put them in an upside down weighted clothes basket and send em back down. 

 

Also the speed with which they are brought up plays a factor too. The faster they come up the less time they have to adjust themselves......the slower the better job they can do on their own.

I like this,..  the slower the better job they can do on their own.

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