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  • Alumacraft190
    Got out last night with Dan and gave it a shot with the light on the north end.  WT 90 thermocline set up at 20' steady everywhere from pt 5 north.  Started pt 5, we marked a few fish here and there and set up over the light but we werent liking what we were seeing.  With the wind yesterday blowing we hit opposite bank and point from pt 5 and didnt come up with much on the graph.  Decided to go north to Indian Creek area.  Got a lot more bait working around the boat so we settled in and gave it a shot.  Picked up one, but surprisingly we had to go down to 50' to get it.  We marked quite all at one time down deep and that was the only one we got to play ball, never did get them up above the 50' range with the light down 16-17'.  Was a great evening on the water and enjoyed the good company.  I'll let Dan chime in with anything I missed.  As usual whether its in his boat or not, Dan is the one holding the fish at the end of the day!  


  • rps
    A few days ago a OA member messaged me for help catching walleye. He explained he would be camping at Parker Bottoms up by the Beaver Lake dam and that he would have a modest boat with him. He specifically wanted advice for fishing downstream as far as Beaver town. Instead I offered to show him.
    I picked Jack up at the Houseman ramp this morning at 6:30. We fished until noon between there and Butler Creek. The front that came through predictably made the fishing tough. We caught handfuls of bluegill but only scratched out two walleye. Unfortunately the one I caught was a 22 inch keeper, but the one Jack caught was between 17 and 18 inches.
    The fish came out of 15 feet of water with a surface water temp of 84.

    While up river very near Houseman I was amazed to find a wake boat with a boardhead tearing up the banks on both sides.

  • kvo113
    Finally found some fish after a long hot day with few bites. Had 15-20 fish, 3 keepers. One was 17.5" and another 19.5-20". Shakey head with mag trick worm. Most of the numbers were on a drop shot dragged from 8 out to 20 foot of water but the keepers were on the shakey head. Caught the big one around midnight in 4-8 foot of water relating to a dock corner surprisingly. 
     
    We were out out again this morning with few bites but hopefully will get on them again tonight. 
    Side note, this lake is becoming more and more like lake of the ozarks. Saw a wake boat with two little kids on a tube make a full speed u turn in the middle of the channel near 13 bridge and they cut right in front of a bass boat, who had to steer hard to avoid the tube. Complete idiocy. Water patrol was in the cove nearby but didn't see it I guess. 


  • Quillback
    One of those days where I couldn't really nail anything down, fished different kinds of structure using several techniques and baits.  Caught one here and there and ended up with a dozen bass, biggest went about 2.5 lbs.  The rest were 12-14" spots and LM's. 
    Got the most on a Trick Worm fished on a Spider head.  Got a couple of a c-rig, a couple early on a wobblehead with a Megabug, and one or two drop shot fish.  A couple of brush piles that were in the 10-20 foot range held a few, a few out on gravel, and the early fish were back in a main lake pocket. 
    There was some scattered TW activity, I was able to throw a Nutech Zinc spoon a few times on TW fish, had a couple of bites, got one about halfway to the boat that jumped a good three feet out of the water and tossed the spoon.  I could be wrong, but I am thinking we may see some main channel, summer early morning, TW activity soon, I think they are just getting started.   Lots of shad out in the channel for them to eat.
    Surface temp as close to 90 as it can get, I saw it hit 89.9 at one point.
    When I got to the ramp there was a husband/wife team (assuming they are married) launching.  Husband in the boat, wife backing the trailer in.  Husband yelling instructions:
    BACK!
    BACK!
    TURN!
    TURN!
    NO, TURN THE OTHER WAY!
    I SAID THE OTHER WAY!
    PULL UP!
    PULL UP!
    OK, NOW BACK!
    BACK!
    They got it done, you have to learn sometime right?
     


  • Phil Lilley

    Generation has been consistent the past few weeks. Dam officials have run "fish water" from about midnight until noon each day and then up to three or four units until late at night. With temperatures in the mid 90's, Table Rock's turbines are turning out much needed electricity.I call "fish water" the generation to the tune of 20 megawatts, or less than one unit. The top of the spillway at Powersite Dam is still damaged from the May flood, so it's letting more water through than normal, dropping Taneycomo's level below 701.3 feet. This causes major problems, exposing a lot of gravel flats uplake that normally are covered with water, so the water is run to keep them covered until the dam is fixed.

    Navigating the lake above Fall Creek is extremely tricky, so much so that a lot of our guides can't get their boats above the Narrows, a shallow, narrow spot in the lake about three-fourths a mile above Fall Creek. But it's makes for some interesting wading and fly fishing!

    The cars . . . the drama of the cars in the lake continues. But there is word that they are to be pulled out Friday and Saturday morning, July 21 and 22. Long story short, a local wrecker service is pulling them out at no charge. We'll see if he gets it done since it won't be easy.
     

    Our lake temperature is holding at 57 degrees, not increasing for a month now. Dissolved oxygen levels remain at good levels, too. There is some concern about the amount of water moved out of Table Rock over the last three months due to the flood in May. Cold water is pulled out of Table Rock at 130 feet, and when too much is pulled out too early in the summer/fall season, the water that's left becomes stagnate, not good for our trout. So we are thankful the water is looking pretty good in this hot part of the summer.
    http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/17240-quick-link-lake-levels/
    We've seen and heard of a lot of big trout reports all this week, both browns and rainbows. Most have been caught on bait but some on jigs. Almost all have been released to be caught again.


     

    Night crawlers has been the hot bait all summer. I took a couple of friends and their kids out this morning fishing. They were running less than one unit as we headed up to Fall Creek, mainly to see the cars in the lake. But that's where we started drifting.
    I had four-pound line on the reels, using a small #7/0 split shot (about 1/16th ounce) 18 inches above a #8 short shank hook. I wanted to use the smallest weight needed to throw out the line, letting the bait sink to the bottom. The kids were novice anglers, so I didn't want them confused between the feel of bites and the feel of bumping the bottom. I pinched a worm in half and hooked it once in the middle, letting it hand off each side (I don't hide the hook).

    It didn't take long to hear, "Fish on!" Lily hooked her first trout! Gavin was the second, but his attention turned to being the net man for the rest of the morning. Keagan wasn't far behind, catching two in a row. It was hard keeping all the lines in the water. All and all, they caught their limits plus a couple and kept four for lunch.

    Randy and Tracy Kemp are regular guests of ours who have been here all week. Randy started fishing with jigs a few summers ago -- may have been last summer when he started. He told me he showed Tracy how to use them this trip and she's been out fishing him. "She hasn't asked to use Powerbait at all this week." And they've caught some nice trout.  Below is a brown she caught on a sculpin jig.

    The stretch from Fall Creek to Short Creek has been pretty good, but a lot of people have been going down as far as the Branson Landing and doing well. Beside night crawlers, orange and chartreuse Powerbait Gulp Eggs have been enticing bites.
    The size of rainbows has been up this summer, too. We're not seeing many really small rainbows as we did in summers past.

    Above Fall Creek, if you can get above the Narrows in the morning, trout are really starting to take zebra midges under an indicator early, before the sun hits the water. Also working are fishing a Miracle Fly (egg fly on a jig head) and a San Juan Worm dropper (bacon and eggs as Duane calls it) under an indicator six- to seven-feet deep.
    I've been testing out my dry flies fairly often -- a beetle, ant or a hopper -- with limited success. It may be too early, but they should be producing bites shortly.

    In the afternoons, fishing has been tough with three units running. I've tried throwing jigs with limited success. I did find some warm water species in slack water close to the dam. Yes, they're still up there. Crappie, red ears, smallmouth bass and spotted bass. I'm catching them on a sculpin 1/8th-ounce jigs. Also catching a few nice rainbows in the same places.

  • Phil Lilley

    Generation has been consistent the past few weeks. Dam officials have run "fish water" from about midnight until noon each day and then up to three or four units until late at night. With temperatures in the mid 90's, Table Rock's turbines are turning out much needed electricity.
    I call "fish water" the generation to the tune of 20 megawatts, or less than one unit. The top of the spillway at Powersite Dam is still damaged from the May flood, so it's letting more water through than normal, dropping Taneycomo's level below 701.3 feet. This causes major problems, exposing a lot of gravel flats uplake that normally are covered with water, so the water is run to keep them covered until the dam is fixed.

    Navigating the lake above Fall Creek is extremely tricky, so much so that a lot of our guides can't get their boats above the Narrows, a shallow, narrow spot in the lake about three-fourths a mile above Fall Creek. But it's makes for some interesting wading and fly fishing!

    The cars . . . the drama of the cars in the lake continues. But there is word that they are to be pulled out Friday and Saturday morning, July 21 and 22. Long story short, a local wrecker service is pulling them out at no charge. We'll see if he gets it done since it won't be easy.
     

    Our lake temperature is holding at 57 degrees, not increasing for a month now. Dissolved oxygen levels remain at good levels, too. There is some concern about the amount of water moved out of Table Rock over the last three months due to the flood in May. Cold water is pulled out of Table Rock at 130 feet, and when too much is pulled out too early in the summer/fall season, the water that's left becomes stagnate, not good for our trout. So we are thankful the water is looking pretty good in this hot part of the summer.
    http://forums.ozarkanglers.com/topic/17240-quick-link-lake-levels/
    We've seen and heard of a lot of big trout reports all this week, both browns and rainbows. Most have been caught on bait but some on jigs. Almost all have been released to be caught again.


     

    Night crawlers has been the hot bait all summer. I took a couple of friends and their kids out this morning fishing. They were running less than one unit as we headed up to Fall Creek, mainly to see the cars in the lake. But that's where we started drifting.
    I had four-pound line on the reels, using a small #7/0 split shot (about 1/16th ounce) 18 inches above a #8 short shank hook. I wanted to use the smallest weight needed to throw out the line, letting the bait sink to the bottom. The kids were novice anglers, so I didn't want them confused between the feel of bites and the feel of bumping the bottom. I pinched a worm in half and hooked it once in the middle, letting it hand off each side (I don't hide the hook).

    It didn't take long to hear, "Fish on!" Lily hooked her first trout! Gavin was the second, but his attention turned to being the net man for the rest of the morning. Keagan wasn't far behind, catching two in a row. It was hard keeping all the lines in the water. All and all, they caught their limits plus a couple and kept four for lunch.

    Randy and Tracy Kemp are regular guests of ours who have been here all week. Randy started fishing with jigs a few summers ago -- may have been last summer when he started. He told me he showed Tracy how to use them this trip and she's been out fishing him. "She hasn't asked to use Powerbait at all this week." And they've caught some nice trout.  Below is a brown she caught on a sculpin jig.

    The stretch from Fall Creek to Short Creek has been pretty good, but a lot of people have been going down as far as the Branson Landing and doing well. Beside night crawlers, orange and chartreuse Powerbait Gulp Eggs have been enticing bites.
    The size of rainbows has been up this summer, too. We're not seeing many really small rainbows as we did in summers past.

    Above Fall Creek, if you can get above the Narrows in the morning, trout are really starting to take zebra midges under an indicator early, before the sun hits the water. Also working are fishing a Miracle Fly (egg fly on a jig head) and a San Juan Worm dropper (bacon and eggs as Duane calls it) under an indicator six- to seven-feet deep.
    I've been testing out my dry flies fairly often -- a beetle, ant or a hopper -- with limited success. It may be too early, but they should be producing bites shortly.

    In the afternoons, fishing has been tough with three units running. I've tried throwing jigs with limited success. I did find some warm water species in slack water close to the dam. Yes, they're still up there. Crappie, red ears, smallmouth bass and spotted bass. I'm catching them on a sculpin 1/8th-ounce jigs. Also catching a few nice rainbows in the same places.

  • MOFishwater
    Finally got to dust off the new (to me) kayak and take a little spin on the river. Wife took the kids up to visit the inlaws so I had a long afternoon to get out and explore. 
    Never fail to be amazed at how we can have such an awesome resource next to a main artery of the state and there's literally nobody using it much of the time. Sitting there watching a couple kingfishers rattling up and down the river, mature bald eagle cruising by, deer drinking from banks while thousands of cars zip by a few hundred yards away oblivious to what's going on outside their vehicle's windows. Not complaining, I thoroughly enjoyed the serenity and alone time! I can be loaded up and down on the access in minutes so I plan to take as much advantage of it as possible. Only thing that would make it better would be having a friend upriver that would let me dump in there and float down instead of having to get a workout in to float back down all too quickly. 
    Had one small spot hit an inline spinner and come unbuttoned, other than that it was pretty slow, more just getting in tune with the new boat and adjusting to the space limitations. Still a wonderful few hours of having a river to myself, hard to beat. Never been much of a river fisherman so it's going to take some patience to find some success, I'm quite sure I'm not in high % water either but that makes it all the more fun to try and figure out. Threw jigs, spinners, whopper plopper, cranks, swimbait, buzzbait. Mebbe next time! 
     
     





  • Phil Lilley

    Is winter over?  The long range forecast says it might be.  But it is only February 8, and there's well over a month left before March 21 arrives here.  And even then, you never know.  Snow could be right around the corner . . . but for today, there's a 75-degree Saturday in sight (after our 75-degree Tuesday yesterday!)  And Lilleys' Landing Resort has openings.
    Generation patterns have been pretty consistent.  Generation officials have been running water most mornings and evenings up to two units with no generation during the middle of the day.  We're still dry here and need some rain to bring the lakes up.
    Drifting with several flies has been working, starting at the dam and working down, when the water is running and you can get up there by boat,   Red or brown San Juan Worms, egg flies and scuds are good.  Scuds in size #14 and either olive or gray.  Bill Babler said he did well Monday using a small floating minnow lure like a Rapala, Rebel or Trout Magnet on a drift rig.  The floating bait keeps your hook from getting snagged on the bottom -- most of the time.
    If you're throwing jigs, good colors have been sculpin, sculpin/peach and ginger.  White isn't working since there have been no shad coming from Table Rock.  Size depends on how much water is running,  which has fluctuated between a half unit to two units.  I'd throw the lightest jig possible.  I wouldn't throw an 1/8th unless they're running more that 90 megawatts of water, or almost two full units.
    The jig-and-float method has been working, too.  Colors are about the same.  As far as weights, most of the time I'd put a 1/32nd-ounce under a float three- to six-feet deep.
    Line size - I'd use two-pound line no matter what you're throwing.  I talked to a good friend about line size last week, and he said he had noticed that his heavier line wasn't doing as well as his partner's two-pound line although his 4.4 pound Tec Tan line usually does really well.  He changed to two-pound P Line and started catching right along with his buddy.
    Anglers have been catching some really nice rainbows below the dam and down through the trophy area. But along with the 17- and 18-inch rainbows there are more of the very small 9- to 10-inch rainbows up there and down here around our place, too.  Not sure when these small rainbows were stocked, but they seem to be schooling together and attacking everything they run into.  Take great care in releasing these beauties since they are the ones that will get smart and grow to be trophies.
    If you're wading, now is a great time to come to Taneycomo.  The water conditions are very good,  and the area below the dam is full of beautiful rainbows in spawning colors.  Here's a rainbow caught today by local angler Mike Curry.

    Below Fall Creek, we've seen some incredibly nice rainbows brought in at the two trout tournaments we've held in the past couple of weeks.  In the last contest, where no one fished above Fall Creek, there were more than a dozen 18-inch-plus rainbows weighed in as well as two legal browns.  I was just amazed at the number of colored-up trout that had clearly been in the lake long enough to lose their grayish, freshly stocked look.  Most of these rainbows were caught on bait -- night crawlers and various colors of Powerbait -- and were caught between our dock and Fall Creek.
    Guide Steve Dickey has been catching trout on a ginger Turner's micro jig under a float four- to six-feet deep.  He's using light 6x or two-pound line.  Of course catching is better if there's been a chop on the surface.  He's also still catching fish on the pink Berkley's Power worm, too.

    Roy Anderson just stepped in to my office to ask if I could take a picture of a rainbow he'd caught.  I did, and he promptly released it.  He caught it close to Short Creek on a sculpin/orange 3/32nd-ounce jig.
    If you're interested in bass fishing, I've heard they're catching some nice blacks and kentuckies down on the lower lake throwing an A-Rig.

  • Phil Lilley
    These days I don't think about writing a fishing report for Lake Taneycomo very often because I feel like I'm giving one every day when I do One Cast, a daily video we do off our dock in which we try to catch a fish by making only one cast.  It's broadcasted on both our resort's Youtube channel and Facebook page. 
    There's not many people fishing right now and that's a little surprising seeing the weather is so nice for late December. Those that are here are catching trout.  We haven't heard too many bad reports lately.

    Generation (the lack of) has been nice to those who like to wade below the dam, as well as still fishing off docks and out in boats.  On cold mornings, they'll run up to 3 units for 2-3 hours and then it's off the rest of the day.
    Water quality is superb now that Table Rock has fully turned over.  The Corp has lifted all generation restrictions and closed the vents on their turbines.
    We have noticed that a lot of the rainbows that have been stocked this month are bigger than normal.  I'm not sure if these trout are from Neosho's hatchery or Shepherd of the Hills.  We normally get a big load from the federal hatchery at Neosho in December and typically these fish are small.  We're still seeing some small rainbows but I think they've been in the lake for several months.
    Duane and I fished Thursday evening from Fall Creek up to the Narrows throwing mainly black 1/16th or 3/32nd ounce jigs and catching a lot of rainbows.  A good number of them appeared to be freshly stocked but measured 13-14 inches and were thick and stocky.  I can't say they were newly stocked trout for sure but they did have that dull coloring we see from stockers.  We didn't catch many small trout, less than 10 inches.

    Black has been the color of choice for several months now.  I even threw a brown jig yesterday and didn't get bit like I did throwing a black.  Duane threw a sculpin/ginger for a bit and caught a few but his bite slowed down when he did switch so he changed back.  We've also been throwing black combos too, like black/olive, black/brown and black/yellow and doing well.  I'm using 2-pound Vanish line, not because the fish can't see it but because I'm throwing small jigs.
    One thing that's absolutely great to see is our midge hatches returning in big numbers.  The last week, especially in the morning and evening, we've had midges coming off the water and our trout responding to them.  I have to point out both because we've had good hatches lately but our trout have turned a blind eye to them.  Not the last few weeks!
    I've been out several evenings, fishing below Fall Creek on the shallow side mainly and seeing dozens and dozens of rises to midges skating across the surface, drying their wings before flight.  Rainbows are chasing and jumping, cruising and sipping and something I haven't seen before (I don't remember seeing)-- rainbows coming straight up out of the water like a whale and inhaling a midge.  The rainbows on the San Juan River are famous for this technique but they are rising to clumps of midges.
                   
    I am targeting these trout using my fly rod and fishing a small Zebra Midge under a tiny float and only fishing it 6-10 inches deep.  Some of the water I'm fishing is only a foot deep--that's where some of the fish are cruising and feeding.  I'm using a rusty, a red or black, and if it's sunny I'm using a P&P midge, mostly a #14 or #16.  And I'm using 6x tippet, or 2-pound line.
    Someone using a spin cast can fish a Zebra under a float but I would suggest fishing out in deeper water and fish it 24-48 inches deep.  When casting with spinning gear, you have to use a bigger float and a bigger float would spook fish holding in shallow water.
    I've tried fishing a scud up above Fall Creek lately and haven't done as well as I had been.  But we had some guests last weekend fish an egg fly under a float and it worked real well for them.  We carry an egg fly called a Miracle fly that's an egg tied on a small jig head and fished just like a small jig under a float.  Some of our rainbows are starting to drop eggs so they're responding to an egg fly pretty good.

    Anglers fishing up below the dam are doing well using a white Mega Worm which is a big, fluffy piece of yarn tied on a hook.  It can also be tied on a small jig head too.  They usually sight fish using it simply because the white worm shows up so clear in the water, you can see it disappear in the fish's mouth.  Mike Curry, a long time angler who lives here in Branson, is one of the best at this technique and has caught some big trout over the years.  But I believe fly shop owner, Tim Homesley, discovered the yarn at his local Wal Mart and started using it on his home waters at Roaring River State Park.

    The Berkley Pink Powerbait Worm is still a hot ticket to catch trout below Fall Creek.  Take only a small 1.5 inch piece of the soft plastic worm and thread it onto a small jig head, fish it anywhere from 3 to 6 feet deep under an indicator.  It's still one of our guide's go-to techniques for catching trout for clients.  They're using either 2 or 4 pound line.
    If you're bait fishing, yellow Powerbait paste is catch a lot of trout off our dock and out in boats.  There doesn't seem to be a hot area on the lake--I see people fishing up close to the mouth of Fall Creek and doing well and hearing others going down towards Monkey Island and the Landing and catching trout too.
    Remember.... and this is very important!  If you're fishing with bait, the trout are going to swallow the hook most of the time.  Don't try to dig your hook out and by all means, don't just jerk it out!  Cut the line without touching the fish and drop it back in the lake.  The trout will have a better chance of surviving this way.  The hook should dissolve in time.  One person can literally kill dozens of trout a day by catch and releasing in an improper way.
    One other thing.  Remember the limit is 4 trout per person per day.  That's not 4 in the morning and 4 in the afternoon.  We see that quite often here... and it doesn't go unnoticed.  We chose to protect the fishery so that anglers arriving tomorrow have fish to catch rather letting someone take more than their limit and ruin it for the next guy.
    Note:  The two images of rainbows posted in this article were taken after I finished writing this report.  I took out one of our jon boats in front of the resort and threw a 1/16th ounce black/olive jig in hopes of catching a few pretty trout for pictures to go with this report, between rain showers.  I caught 3 rainbows, one was nice size but not real pretty.  These two were actually bigger than what I was expecting.  But what I wanted to take note of is that both of these rainbows spit up both scuds and sow bugs when placed in the tank.

  • Phil Lilley
    For the most part, there's been very little generation on Lake Taneycomo the past couple of weeks.  If operators run the turbines, it's early in the morning for an hour or two (70 megawatts) and in the afternoon beginning  2 to 4 p.m. and running either for an hour or until dark.  I know that sounds arbitrary, but there really isn't a pattern.  We count on some water running every day but with extended periods of no generation most of the day and all night.
    Speaking of night time, fishing after dark has been good below the dam, wading and throwing a variety of streamers.  Brown trout activity has slowed, but there are still a lot of nice trout up there to be caught.  Flies that will do well are leaches, Hybernators, wooly buggers, Cracklebacks, Pine Squirrels and sculpins.

    Some of the guys who regularly fly fish below the dam say fishing has really been slow until they start generating, and then it's good around the outlets.  But fly fishing from the Missouri Department of Conservation boat ramp down seems to be pretty good.  I've fly fished a couple of times around Lookout Island and have caught a few very nice, colored up rainbows on scuds -- whether the water was off or running.  I fished both sides of the island.
    I've also been throwing a 1/16th-ounce olive or black marabou jig from Lookout Island and down lake and have fared better than I did earlier in the fall and even in the summer.  Of course, I am using two-pound line when fishing a small jig.  I use Trilene XL clear.
    I have heard some fly fishers are catching a few trout on dries on the upper lake.  Jeremy Hunt, a fishing guide, says his clients are throwing #16 and #18 black ants and catching big rainbows and a few browns.  He said it's best to find chop on the water for the ants to work.

    For the past week, I've been fishing a scud in an area below Fall Creek, not above in the trophy area.  I got the notion to throw a scud after fishing a flat over a week ago.  Zebra Midges weren't cutting it, and as I was fishing, and not catching, I noticed rainbows cruising around in front of me nosing the gravel trying to kick up bugs.  I know there's a good population of scuds in that area, so I tied on a #12 peppy (200R hook) and pinched on a palsa indicator four feet above the fly, 6x fluorocarbon tippet.


    That day, I was out about 1 p.m. and it was sunny with very little wind--not the best fishing conditions.  But the trout were actively feeding, and they liked my peppy scud.
    I've gone out several times since at all times of the day.  Saturday I went out at 9 a.m. and started fishing the flat.  This is the east or inside bank from the Riverpointe boat ramp up to the first dock somewhat across from Fall Creek Marina.  It's a stretch that was formerly dotted with a dozen docks, but all have been taken out since the last flood.  Because of the trajectory of the sun right now, this water is in the shade most of the day, and that's where I was keying in on, the shade.  But it was slow . . . one rainbow and few bites.  So I boated on up into the trophy area and tried some deeper banks and set the scud at eight- to nine-feet deep.
    After striking out on the deep bank, I trolled over to the shallow side, the bank below the Narrows, and started fishing some water where I knew I'd catch fish.  And I did, sight fishing to some rainbows cruising in less than a foot of water -- that was fun.  Then I fished the water just above the mouth of Fall Creek.  By this time, the wind had really picked, blowing down lake or out of the south.  That, I believe, really turned the fish on and I was rewarded with a bite on every cast.
    I wanted to again hit the bank where I had started  before heading in, so I boated back down and started at the log below the log house/dock.  This log is about 50 feet from the bank and runs long ways with the root wad sticking out of the water.  I set the boat as close to the bank as I could get it without bottoming out, (although I did many times.)  So I  was fishing  50 feet or less from the bank behind me in no more than three feet of water.  Most of the time I was throwing to 18 to 24 inches of water and set the scud at five feet from the indicator.
    This is what I have determined:  These rainbows are taking a scud in sunlight better than shade.  I've fished this area enough in both conditions, and every time I fished in sunny conditions, no matter what the surface looked like, they were much more active in sunlight.  Of course, Saturday's chop on the water really helped.  I caught more than 20 rainbows in that small stretch of time.  One rainbow took me to my backing, twice!  It was only 17 inches long, but he thought he was 23!
    I'm going to keep experimenting with scuds below Fall Creek because I know it's an untapped resource.  These trout haven't seen many scud flies, but at the same time they're seeing lots of live ones.
    Bill Babler, one of our fishing guides, reports he's using a ginger micro jig in the trophy area and catching well.  His clients caught and released 60 trout Saturday morning.  But it hasn't been like that every day for the guides.  I'd say at least three days last week, they were struggling to find trout that would bite.  Some days were better than others.
    The same can be said about trout fishing in general.  Anglers using bait are having some great days catching fish and some not-so-great days, especially off our dock.  White is back as the hot color.  Last week was yellow paste.

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