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Just Can't Convince Myself...


Mitch f

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Love the heck out out braided line but can't convince myself that I dont need a fluorocarbon leader in clear water. I've had many great fishermen tell me otherwise but I just can't do it.......it's just a confidence thing. Please someone give me proof that the big ones (don't care about the small ones) don't care. It would sure make jig fishing much easier.

"Honor is a man's gift to himself" Rob Roy McGregor

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Troll or crank, do not worry about the leader. For a slow finesse presentation, like a shaky head, Alberto knot a smaller YoZuri Hybrid leader and knock their lights out.

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I haven't found an argument FOR braid yet except for frog fishing. I can only see you needing it if you fish for money. However I am a firm believer in leaders.

everything in this post is purely opinion and is said to annoy you.

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Braid last a long time, unless you clip away at it. I use a leader because it's easier to retie and saves my braid. I'm sure it isn't a negative for the fish either. It als o give me a little shock absorber.

Today's release is tomorrows gift to another fisherman.

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I never use a leader. But I use a little thinner braid than most recommend. 4/15 Power Pro is my normal summertime line (spinning reels only, I use mono on all my casting reels). In the winter I'll go down to 2/10 on one rod.

Here's the way I look at it. Fish can see pretty darned well underwater. Well enough that if they were looking for it they could easily see 2 pound test mono in clear water. But they have pretty small brains, and let's face it, they ain't smart. They don't think. So I'm pretty sure they don't think, "Hey, there's something that looks good to eat, but it has a line thingy hanging from it so I don't think I'll try it." If they DID think that way, given that they can probably see your line in clear water no matter how light and thin it is, they'd never take a lure or bait. So I doubt that the line makes much difference unless it is VERY obvious. Thin braids are a little more obvious under certain light conditions than mono of the same diameter, but under other light conditions they may even be less obvious, since mono reflects light a little more than braid due to its smoothness (mirror qualities). Now, I think that if the line is so obvious that it's as noticeable as the lure itself--looks like a part of the lure, say--I could see it turning them off. But thin braid is only a little more noticeable than mono of comparable diameter on average.

And, tying on a leader means another knot that might fail, more time to tie it, and possible casting problems. Plus, it detracts a bit from one of the positives of braid, the sensitivity. I acknowledge that a leader does have the benefit of breaking off on a snag easier than the braid, and acting as a bit of shock absorber on hook sets. Which is why I use lighter power rods with braids than I would if I were using mono for the same applications.

I guess the proof is in the pudding, Mitch. I've fished out of the same boat with guys using mono with the same lures I was using, and caught just as many fish as they did.

Here's a thought. I use braid exclusively with spinning tackle, and I use spinning tackle exclusively to fish soft plastics and jigs. If you're fishing stuff like that on or near the bottom, the fish is going to be viewing your line against a background of whatever is on the bottom. So...if you're concerned about them seeing your line, camouflage the last few feet of it. Go buy some brown, green, and orange magic markers and color those last few feet. It should then be at least as invisible as mono to the fish.

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I never use a leader. But I use a little thinner braid than most recommend. 4/15 Power Pro is my normal summertime line (spinning reels only, I use mono on all my casting reels). In the winter I'll go down to 2/10 on one rod.

Here's the way I look at it. Fish can see pretty darned well underwater. Well enough that if they were looking for it they could easily see 2 pound test mono in clear water. But they have pretty small brains, and let's face it, they ain't smart. They don't think. So I'm pretty sure they don't think, "Hey, there's something that looks good to eat, but it has a line thingy hanging from it so I don't think I'll try it." If they DID think that way, given that they can probably see your line in clear water no matter how light and thin it is, they'd never take a lure or bait. So I doubt that the line makes much difference unless it is VERY obvious. Thin braids are a little more obvious under certain light conditions than mono of the same diameter, but under other light conditions they may even be less obvious, since mono reflects light a little more than braid due to its smoothness (mirror qualities). Now, I think that if the line is so obvious that it's as noticeable as the lure itself--looks like a part of the lure, say--I could see it turning them off. But thin braid is only a little more noticeable than mono of comparable diameter on average.

And, tying on a leader means another knot that might fail, more time to tie it, and possible casting problems. Plus, it detracts a bit from one of the positives of braid, the sensitivity. I acknowledge that a leader does have the benefit of breaking off on a snag easier than the braid, and acting as a bit of shock absorber on hook sets. Which is why I use lighter power rods with braids than I would if I were using mono for the same applications.

I guess the proof is in the pudding, Mitch. I've fished out of the same boat with guys using mono with the same lures I was using, and caught just as many fish as they did.

Here's a thought. I use braid exclusively with spinning tackle, and I use spinning tackle exclusively to fish soft plastics and jigs. If you're fishing stuff like that on or near the bottom, the fish is going to be viewing your line against a background of whatever is on the bottom. So...if you're concerned about them seeing your line, camouflage the last few feet of it. Go buy some brown, green, and orange magic markers and color those last few feet. It should then be at least as invisible as mono to the fish.

If I remember right there was a camo line for crappie fishermen, can't recall the name. I know you use McCoys Mean Green on all your hard baits; what advantages over braid does McCoys have when using hard baits?

"Honor is a man's gift to himself" Rob Roy McGregor

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I use McCoys on all my casting reels. And I use casting tackle for all hard baits. Mainly, it works, it's worked for many years, and I see no reason to change. To me, the benefits of braid are mostly in the sensitivity and in being less affected by line twist for spinning reels. The drawbacks are that it resists breaking when you WANT it to break, and it wants to wrap around the tip of your rod. I don't need sensitivity for hard baits, and I've found the McCoys to be extremely trouble free on casting reels.

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I only use braid on spinning reels. My current line of choice is the 6lb Suffix Performance braid in hi-vis yellow...and I always use a leader....The leader is there for two reasons...#1 the stuff is very thin and gravel, rocks, & logs will abrade it quickly. A mono or flouro leader takes that kind of punishment better.. #2 Its easier to break the leader off than to break the braid....no reason to sacrifice a bunch of good braid for a snag. Cheers.

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