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Hook Size For Plastic Worm


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I fish small ponds with plastic worm rigs...usually 4-5 inch for lg mouth bass but miss a lot of strikes. They pick it up and run with it, I give them line but when I set the hook...nothing.

I wonder if my hook size is too large...using #4

Any suggestions on what works best for you?

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Probably not too big unless the fish you're getting to bite are really small. Usually if you're letting the fish run with it and you're still missing on the hookset then your hook is too small. Not sure about a #4 sized hook, but I use Gamakatsu EWG Worm Hooks in 2/0 size for 4" worms/creature baits and 3/0 for 5" baits... Bigger than that you probably need to use a 4/0 or 5/0 once you get up to 10" Power Worms.

Paul

MOsmallies

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a size 4 or a 4/0? A size 4 is too small, a 4/0 would be too big, in my opinion, with a 4 inch worm.

Now, are these finesse worms, senkos, or what? Do you texas rig them? There are a lot of variable that could change the size of the hook I'd use.

In general, I use a 1/0 to 3/0 off set worm hook for small sized worms texas rigged.

Also, the fish running off with your worms may not be large mouth bass. Might need to use a larger worm to weed out some of the small sunfish nibbling at your bait.

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I use 3/0 hooks with my 4" senkos and 5" flukes. Works great.

-- Jim

If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles. -- Doug Larson

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If you're using a 4 inch worm in a farm pond, get yourself some of the Pro series Spider slider heads with the 2/0 hook and never look back.

Every Saint has a past, every Sinner has a future. On Instagram @hamneedstofish

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I also tend to go with 2/0 on the 4' worms. Although I prefer some form of jig head in 1/8th oz size to give it the weight.

"Thanks to Mother Mercy, Thanks to Brother Wine, Another night is over and we're walking down the line" - David Mallett

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thanks...I measured the worm and is actually about 5 inches (I pull part of the head of a 7 inch off to reduce size) I might drop back to a 3.0 and try it...will let you know how I do.

yesterday hooked 5, landed 3 and missed a whole lot of bits with the 4.0 so some change is needed. Largest lg mouth measures 15 1/2 inches

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I'd join the 2/0 hook folks for that, depending on the hook style, etc. If that doesn't get you significanly better results after a while, you might also try setting the hook a lot sooner. The one other possible factor that comes to mind is if your rod ( gotta watch the wording here).... if it has a great deal of flex, try a faster/stiffer action rod.

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you also don't need an EWG hook for a worm, especially not a 5 inch worm. a straight shank hook will give you a better hook up ratio as it doesn't tend to flip on it's side and pop out between the bass's lips like an EWG hook will. EWG hooks are made for creature baits and thicker bodied plastics than a small/mid sized worm. the gap on the hook only needs to be twice as deep as your worm is wide. but needs to be about 3x's as deep on a thicker bait like a toad or creature bait/craw.

I use a 1/0 hook on 4 inch plastics, a 3/0 on 5 inch and a 5/0 on 6-7 inch baits. You can play around with that a little as some baits need a shorter hook, ie a beaver or punch bait than say a magnum 10"+ worm.

also note on how hard you are setting the hook. If you are jerking on it so hard and with so much force that you look like bill dance, then you may be pulling it so hard that the knot and eye of the hook cause the fish's mouth to open and the hook pops out. If you reel down and then simply lift your rod tip from say 7 oclock to 11 oclock position, it should be sufficient to set the hook properly, especially with a properly sharpened hook. THEN, move the fish if it's near cover or just start reeling. Lots of anglers try to power that hook home and they actually have the opposite effect than intended. I always ask them, "do you think you would have hooked that fish if you had set the hook any harder?" the answer is always, "no, that's as hard as I could set it" (and failed) I'm not saying that's your problem, but it's something a lot of angler do incorrectly without realizing it when fishing soft plastics on the bottom.

for bottom contact techniques I like a fast action sensitive rod and either braid or fluoro. the stretch from mono tends to be not so great. Also, the deeper you are fishing (or the further you are casting) the longer rod you want. More leverage. I would use at least a 6'6" but prefer a 7 foot rod for plastics on the bottom.

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