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Fishing Report


Rolan Duffield

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My brothers and I had a great time during the week with some very good days and some periods that were quite slow. Yes Bill, I prefer afternoon and early evening fishing. Early evenings always seems to be a better time of day for me. I also prefer to keep moving and do not stay in a given place very long.

I agree with Phil and Bill in their reports about weather conditions. No wind with sunshine - expect catching to be much tougher because of the clear water and fish that spook easily. Slight wind chop on the water and cloudy - my choice for more strikes, higher catch rates annd bigger Trout. You'll generally catch the larger fish with some wind on the water.

I also caught several 6" trout in the area we normally fish from Lookout to Fall Creek. Don't ever remember seeing Trout this small in Taney. Their appears to be good numbers of trout in this upper area. Seems like we noticed more moving in during the later part of the week. Many of the Trout are fat, bright colored and good fighters.

Much of the upper lake bed is covered with a green moss or scum on the rocky bottom area. Phil has reported about that and i'm certain this doesn't help the food base.

I'm convinced that most Trout fishermen do not see the average strike which limits their ability to catch fish. Seeing a strike is often difficult as most of the time you will only see a very very slight unnatural movement of the float. Any variance to the natural drift or movement of your float is reason to set the hook.

If fishing scuds, make certain the fly is near the bottom of the stream. Also keep all slack out of the fly line and leader. That's very important if their's a breeze or windy conditions you will not see the suttle strikes unless you keep all slack out of your line.

Many of us prefer the small Palsa floats for much of this type fishing, however, if their is wind on the water, use a slightly larger styrofoam float. That should help you to see strikes and increase your catch rate.

One last suggestion. Learn to set the hook by a simple upward flick of the wrist. Also develop a habit of setting the hook this way when you pick up your line. This will help prevent many of those breakoff's.

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I'm convinced that most Trout fishermen do not see the average strike which limits their ability to catch fish. Seeing a strike is often difficult as most of the time you will only see a very very slight unnatural movement of the float. Any variance to the natural drift or movement of your float is reason to set the hook.

One last suggestion. Learn to set the hook by a simple upward flick of the wrist. Also develop a habit of setting the hook this way when you pick up your line. This will help prevent many of those breakoff's.

I was watching a video of Joe Humphries (with Joe sitting by me narrating) and he said at one point "here's what happens when you get my age... watch... see that? one... two... THREE... see that? THREE missed stikes... I didn't even TRY to set the hook...." Watching the video, it was clear that the strikes were there. My point... even the BEST of fly fishermen have trouble seeing all strikes... that's for sure.

Another well-known fly-fishing "expert" once told me to get use to setting the hook with an upward flick of the wrist and if it felt like a rock (big fish), continue by raising the rod high in the hand over the head as far up as you could... THEN start to fight...

Your opinion of that advice, please, Rolan? And... good advice/post by the way...

TIGHT LINES, YA'LL

 

"There he stands, draped in more equipment than a telephone lineman, trying to outwit an organism with a brain no bigger than a breadcrumb, and getting licked in the process." - Paul O’Neil

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Fantastic report and great info.

Usually my best week of the year when Roland and the boys are here.

I could set and watch Roland cast all day. I have taken and watched 1000's of fly casters and the ease and beauty of Roland's fly cast are equaled by few and surpassed by none. Some days as I look up the river thru dozens of fly fisherman, I don't have to see the face, only the perfect loop, to know who is making the presentation.

A true scolar of the sport and a gentleman in every way. It is my pleasure to call him a very dear friend.

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Terry: I partially agree with your last statement, however, if you set the hook too hard, thats the last time you will see any trout as he's just taken your fly. Develop a technique to set the hook the same way every time. Once you have a fish on, then raise the rod tip high to lessen the pressure on your line. Keeping the rod high lets the flex in the rod help control the unexpected actions of the fish and lessens the chance of the Trout breaking you off.

My experience with a large fish strike says he most likely will charge the fly and break you off easily. Try to develop a technique of setting the hook using a simple upward movement with the wrist.

Bill: The feeling is mutual. I always enjoy your reports and taking the time to share your knowledge with others. Do you remember when "Peppy" started our fishing relationship?

I really enjoyed your reports about the professional Bass Tournament on Table Rock.

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I think that is more in line with what I was told... you explained it better than I stated it.

Thanks...

TIGHT LINES, YA'LL

 

"There he stands, draped in more equipment than a telephone lineman, trying to outwit an organism with a brain no bigger than a breadcrumb, and getting licked in the process." - Paul O’Neil

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