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How Many Miles?


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Hello everyone. I am new to this site and new to the kayak fishing world. My brother and I both purchased our first kayaks about 3 months ago and ready to start fishing somewhere besides our home waters.

I am trying to plan us a couple trips. I was wondering about how many miles you guys fish in a day? I would like to plan a one day trip on the mermac and a 3 day trip on the gasconade in June. Just wasn't real sure how many miles to plan these for.

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An important question before anyone can answer accurately. How do you like to fish?

Example: I can take 2 - 2.5 days to fish an 11 mile float.. Someone Like Al A. probably does that in 10-12 hours.

So if you like to stop and fish every possible fish holding area that is important to know. I have spent an hour sitting below one riffle and kept fishing until the fish quit biting before moving on. If I do really good on a spot I stop/back up and fish it again.

Some people are throwing fast reaction baits and barely slow down to fish an area that might take me 30 minutes to fish.

It is all a matter of preference on how you like to fish. Both ways can produce awesome fish count's so it is just up to your preferred style.

Joe

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Joe is right. It depends upon how you like to fish. As a general rule, for a day float, if you fish like he does, figure five miles. If you fish like I do, figure 10 miles. As for overnight floats like your 3-day one on the Gasconade, you also have to ask yourself how much time you spend on the river and how much time you spend setting up camp, cooking elaborate breakfasts and suppers, and lollygagging around camp waiting for the dew to dry off the tent in the mornings, etc. I tend to get an early start and stay on the river late, so I might easily float 12 miles each day the first two days, depending upon when I get on the water at the beginning of the float, but I usually plan so the third day is a shorter one so I can get off the river and drive home at a reasonable hour. So for me, a good three day float will be about 25-30 miles. But if you like to make the camping end of things more important, you might do only 12-15 miles in three days.

The real trick is to KNOW WHERE YOU ARE ON THE RIVER. If it's an unfamiliar river, either have good maps you know how to read, or know how to use your GPS really well, so that you know how you're progressing at all times. It isn't fun to realize that you're way ahead of schedule or way behind schedule, no matter how far you're floating. For instance, you might THINK you're a slow fisherman and decide to only float 15 miles in three days, and then realize that you've ended up floating 10 miles the first day and you don't have much water left. Or you might think you're a fast fisherman and opt for a 30 mile float, and realize at noon on the third day that you still have 10 miles to cover. But if you know where you are on the river and how much water you need to cover, you can alter what you're doing and speed up, or stop for a long lunch and a hike to the top of that bluff to see what it looks like from up there.

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Thanks guys... For the 1 day mermac trip I think we are going to try and put in at river view public access and take out at birds nest. As for the 3 day gasconade trip I think we are gonna try putting in at hwy 17 bridge near waynesville and take out at hwy o near Jerome. Might be a little long but that's ok, got the whole week off. Can't wait to chase some smallies on better water. We fish the gasconade quit a bit but it is the lower end from Rollins ferry to pointers creek. We catch fish but its usually pretty slow goin

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I might add that water level can change the game also, the more water to fish the longer it will take. If the reason for going is strictly fishing then, IMO, 7 or 9 miles is tops. Having some Idea, like Al said can really help. If fishing is good you can take advantage of while still being able to get to your destination on time.

I prefer to wade and that will also slow one down quite a bit. Once you get out and secure the boat, you tend to fish a hole more thoroughly.

Cooperative fish can really throw a wrench in things and slow you down considerably.

Today's release is tomorrows gift to another fisherman.

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My preference is about 7 miles in a 10 hour day under optimal conditions. Try to know so landmarks along the river so that you can guage your speend.

Every Saint has a past, every Sinner has a future. On Instagram @hamneedstofish

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I'm slow. I fit more into Wayne's category. It's not because I spend a long time at each hole, but I do spend a lot of time just hanging out. Elaborate breakfasts and dinners? Oh hell yes. Always on the go most of the time so on a float trip it's time to slow down and relax.

 

 

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It really depends on your objectives, and the stream gradient...5-7 miles is a great length for a day float. You have plenty of time to get out, wade, and putz around. You wont have time to get out and wade much on a 10-12 mile float especially on a slow moving stream.

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I thought I fished "SLOW" until I fished with Wayne.

Every Saint has a past, every Sinner has a future. On Instagram @hamneedstofish

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Right Ham?! :secret-laugh: That crazy Wayne can take his time!

"you can always beat the keeper, but you can never beat the post"

There are only three things in life that are certain : death, taxes, and the wind blowing at Capps Creek!

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