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Fly Selection


Mikey

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Here we go:

I've read that y2k bugs are good...san juan worms right now when the water is up...trout crack...and zebra midges. Having read this I strolled to my 'the tacklebox' here in fort smith hoping to find some of these, they handle the umpqua line of flies. I found the san juan worms. They keep natural, a golden orange color, purple and red. I found various scud patterns but none like the trout crack pictures I've seen here. Certainly nothing explicitly called 'trout crack'. I asked about the y2k and got some really strange looks from the girl working there. No bother, but are there any zebra midges. Indeed, I believe I found zebra midges. I can't be 100% certain, for if these were ZMs I would have to had the hubble telescope to make them out.

So here are my questions:

  • Any suggestions on coloration for the san juan worm?
  • Is there truly something magical about the stripe down the back of the trout crack, or would I get by with some scuds?
  • Since I'll be staying at Bull Shyoals state park next month, are there any shops in the area that would handle the Y2K?
  • Just how @#$%#!! small is a zebra midge supposed to be? Seriously, I have no idea how a hook that small will catch anything.

I hope nobody thinks I'm just spamming up this board, but you guys are my body of knowledge when it comes to fly fishing. I know I'll look like a complete goof when I go up there next month but with your suggestions and help, I'll be getting a few things right.

Mikey

Each time I buy a new fly............

My wife gives me the same look........

I give her when she buys another purse...

................4171.gif..............

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San Juan Worms, the most popular colors are red and natural, scuds are generally an acceptable substitution for trout crack, and Zebra Midges are normally only offered in sizes 20 and smaller. Yes, hubble material!

Good luck on the stream!

Andy

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Then forgive my ignorance, but when fishing a fly as small as a 20...what sign should I look for to know when I have a take on it? I know to use an indicator, but what will it do when a trout has the fly? It just seems to me that if it goes UNDER, the fly has been swallowed whole.

Mikey

Each time I buy a new fly............

My wife gives me the same look........

I give her when she buys another purse...

................4171.gif..............

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It is not necessary to go that small. I fished with size 16 and 18 last time to Taney and caught 20 or 30 every time out. I had the best luck with copper tungsten heads and black or olive thread wrapped with copper or silver wire. Any of these combinations work.

I have caught as large as a 22" rainbow on a size 18. The strikes aren't much different with the exception that sometimes the line or indicator just moves away or stops if it is drifting and doesn't necessarly go under. The smallest indicator that still floats above the fly is the way to go. The smaller indicator helps detect the strike better and doesn't disturb the water when it lands to spook the fish if there is no chop on the water.

San jaun worms in brown or red are effective especially after a rain or high water flow.

Thom Harvengt

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I typically fish midges in sz 18's and 16's. Its my contention if they take a 16, they will take an 18 etc.

The amber v rib down the back of the trout crack probably is important in that it helps segment the body and gives it some sheen. If you want to buy trout crack go to www.flyfishingarkansas.com and just ask anywhere on the board. Someone there can tell you if the local shops carry them. Also Jimmy T on that board ties and sells them at his shop at Bull Shoals. Dano

Glass Has Class

"from the laid back lane in the Arkansas Ozarks"

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What Dano said...

The V-rib down the back of the Trout Crack (the "stripe") can be key. Yes, standard scuds will work, but something about that V-rib and sectioning makes it that much more appealing to the trout. According to John, it mimmicks more than just a scud, so that makes it a little more effective than a standard scud.

SJWs work best in higher water, but will work in shallow water as well. I got a tip from a guy a couple of years ago that made the SJW more appealing. Find some plastic egg colored beads and slip one up the tippet, hold it in place with a toothpick about 4-8 inches up from the SJW. Seems to attract more fish to the fly.

Jimmy T at "Wishes & Fishes" in the town of Bull Shoals (just across the dam) may have Y2Ks, but I KNOW Mountain River Fly Shop in Cotter will have some or will tie you a few if they don't have them in stock.

Also, if you tie SJWs, try taking the chenille and a colored Sharpie marker, and make a contrasting stripe down the "back" of the worm before tying it on the hook. As well, tie the chenille with a loop or three on the hook will give it a more "natural" aquatic worm look.

I've caught fish over 22 inches with a #24 hook. I've seen a couple of 24 and better fish caught on 24s. Those little hooks are tougher than they look. I have a friend who says he caught a big trout (don't remember the size, but over 24 inches) on a size 28 midge. However, with all that said, I fish a lot of 18s and do just fine.

One more tip... Pick up some size 18 Copper Johns. Under the right conditions, they can be deadly...

TIGHT LINES, YA'LL

 

"There he stands, draped in more equipment than a telephone lineman, trying to outwit an organism with a brain no bigger than a breadcrumb, and getting licked in the process." - Paul O’Neil

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One of the first things I learned when I moved here several years ago is that many of the food sources are very small. When fishing these small nymphs it is important to realize that any takes will be very subtle. The indicator will not go down like a bobber pulled down by an agressive crappie. The indicator may just stop drifting or may move up stream. When in doubt, set the hook.

John Berry

OAF CONTRIBUTOR

Fly Fishing For Trout

(870)435-2169

http://www.berrybrothersguides.com

berrybrothers@infodash.com

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Okay, so am I correct in that when a trout takes a fly it is nothing like when a bass takes a plug? Where a bass will consume it, a trout is more delicate? Not pulling the fly all the way into its throat, more or less tasting it? Also, so as not to start another topic here, can someone tell me what knot they use to tie the leader to their flyline? I see the nail knot, but wonder if there is anything any easier. Currently I have the knotless insert coupled with leader that has a loop already on it. After reading nearly all of the posts I'm starting to feel a little redneck in my rig. Granted, until now it's all I knew.

I never had anyone to show me how to fly fish or give me any tips pointers and tactics. I bought a rod from Sears some dozen years ago when I was around 16 and enjoyed catching bass and perch with it on local creeks. Felt the next logical step was to get another rod and use it for trout. My old rod, in case you wonder, was used by my father to stake a goose out by his pond. It was a kite that looked like a goose. Such a waste.

Mikey

Each time I buy a new fly............

My wife gives me the same look........

I give her when she buys another purse...

................4171.gif..............

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I've had trout take a fly that reminded me of a bass devouring a top water plug... But most of the time, it is a very subtle take. Recently (OK.. a couple months ago) I was swinging a wooly when it just kind of slowed down... not stopped... just slowed to a crawl... After a moment, I felt a little "tap" in the rod and set the hook....

I didn't land it, but it was well over 22 inches and more like over 24 inch trout.

When you are standing there "shuffling" (by accident of course...) watch those trout at your feet feed. You'll get the idea just how subtle they do take a fly.

If you've ever "tight line" fished for Crappie, it's similar...

Hey... I started with a $29 Shakespeare fly fishing "kit" from WalMart... Still have that rod... But I don't use it for a goose kite anchor.... :lol:

TIGHT LINES, YA'LL

 

"There he stands, draped in more equipment than a telephone lineman, trying to outwit an organism with a brain no bigger than a breadcrumb, and getting licked in the process." - Paul O’Neil

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Terry,

I'm not sure if my rig is worth a darn. I spent more than $29 on it because I bought the pieces individually. I got it from a guy I work with that sold me the rod (an 8'6" mitchell 6/7 wt - graphite 2 pc), the reel (scientific angler concept 58), a spool of cortland fairplay backing (which i had never messed with on my previous rig since it was already spooled) and a spool of cortland floating line. I paid $50 for all of it. The best part of my fly rig when when I requested a nice case for it on my birthday last Sept. Now if I can just beef up my fly selection so it will be worth a darn in these local waters I'll be ok.

Mikey

Each time I buy a new fly............

My wife gives me the same look........

I give her when she buys another purse...

................4171.gif..............

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