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December 6, 2007

A service of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

News Contacts: Michael Bergin or Micah Holmes (405) 521-3856

Web site: wildlifedepartment.com

Donations help introduce students to archery

Field, Forest & Stream exhibit to hit Oklahoma History Center

Waterfowl season kicks off second round

Outdoor Calendar

Hunter education clinics

Waterfowl Report

Fishing Report

Donations help introduce students to archery

Nearly 100 schools are introducing students to the sport of archery through the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Oklahoma Archery in Schools (OAIS) program, and two recent donations will help ensure the program remains readily accessible to Oklahoma classrooms.

At its December meeting, the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission accepted $9,500 in donations from the Oklahoma Station Chapter of Safari Club International and $5,000 from the National Wild Turkey Federation for the OAIS program. The donations will be applied to grants that help schools start the program at a fraction of the full cost.

These donations will combine with nearly $50,000 dollars that the Wildlife Department had already set aside from license funds and a grant made available through the federal Wildlife Restoration Program to help schools launch OAIS programs in their communities.

“The way it’s set up, schools only pay about $1,300 for equipment that is actually valued at $5,000,” said Lance Meek, OAIS coordinator for the Wildlife Department. “They get all the bows, arrows, targets, safety nets and almost everything else needed for running an Archery in the Schools program. This donation will be enough to help up to 12 more schools get started with the program. Thanks to the Oklahoma Station Chapter of SCI and the National Wild Turkey Federation, we’re going to be able to introduce a lot more students to shooting sports.”

The OAIS program is coordinated by the Wildlife Department and offers competitive archery and instruction to students in 4th-12th grade, covering everything from archery history to safety, proper shooting techniques, equipment, mental concentration and self-improvement. It is part of a national program that partners state wildlife agencies, schools and the nation’s archery industry to introduce students to the sport of archery. About 90 schools in Oklahoma have already started OAIS programs in their classrooms, and nearly 6,500 students participated in the program last year alone. About 400 of those attended the state tournament held at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, where prizes included bows, arrows, bow cases, trophies and medals.

The Oklahoma Station Chapter of SCI also partners with the Wildlife Department to sponsor several other important programs such as Hunters Against Hunger and the Shotgun Training Education (STEP) program. In the past, the organization also has helped fund the purchase of an airboat used by the Wildlife Department on waterfowl surveys and other wetland management tasks. Additionally, the chapter purchased eight elk for introduction into an existing herd in southeast Oklahoma. The organization also sponsors the Department's annual youth essay contest, which gives youth the opportunity to share their feelings about Oklahoma’s outdoors and the chance to win great prizes, including a guided pronghorn antelope hunt in New Mexico.

The National Wild Turkey Federation is a conservation organization based in Edgefield, South Carolina, that is dedicated to conservation of wild turkeys and the preservation of hunting traditions. The group has helped fund habitat projects on several wildlife management areas across the state, such as planting roosting trees at the Sandy Sanders WMA in southwest Oklahoma, prescribed burns at Spavinah and Cherokee WMAs in the northeast, and improving shooting ranges at Hugo WMA in southeast Oklahoma. The NWTF also funds events for JAKES (Juniors Acquiring Knowledge, Ethics and Sportsmanship), Women in the Outdoors and Wheeling Sportsmen, programs that offer outdoor learning opportunities to kids, women and people with disabilities.

Teachers interested in learning more about the OAIS program or in starting an OAIS program at their school should contact Meek at (405) 522-4572.

“We want as many schools as possible to participate in the program,” Meek said. “In order to be eligible for a grant to start an Archery in the Schools program, schools will need to send a few teachers to an eight-hour workshop where they will learn how to run the OAIS program at their school and instruct students in archery.

The Commission also heard a presentation from Greg Summers, fisheries research laboratory supervisor for the Wildlife Department, about a marketing campaign launched by the Department to promote senior citizen hunting and fishing licenses.

Summers also discussed a partnership marketing campaign between the Department and the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation (RBFF) aimed at retaining anglers who no longer fish or buy fishing licenses. The RBFF has agreed to match $25,000 of Wildlife Department funds toward the marketing effort.

The Commission voted to increase the Wildlife Department’s fisheries division budget by $65,000 to cover the cost of the two marketing campaigns.

This budget increase will allow us to focus our efforts on retaining license buyers who otherwise might lapse,” Summers said. “We’ve got to get the message out that today’s sportsmen are the ones who will provide conservation for tomorrow’s outdoorsmen.”

In other business, Mike Breedlove of Shikar-Safari Club International and Larry Manering, law enforcement chief for the Wildlife Department, presented Jerry Henry with the Shikar-Safari Club International Wildlife Officer of the Year Award for 2007. Henry currently is stationed in Sequoyah Co. and is a 21-year veteran with the Wildlife Department.

According to Shikar-Safari Club member Mike Breedlove, who presented the award to Henry, the Shikar-Safari Club International started in 1950 by sportsmen wanting to give back to conservation and wildlife what they were able to enjoy in the outdoors. The group has participated in conservation efforts as well as provided scholarships to youth seeking careers in wildlife conservation.

Jamie Cole, game warden stationed in Pawnee County, also was recognized at the Commission meeting for 25 years of service to the Wildlife Department and sportsmen of the state.

The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Wildlife Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate.

The next scheduled Commission meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. Jan. 7 at the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation headquarters (auditorium), at the southwest corner of 18th and North Lincoln, Oklahoma City.

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To learn more about the Oklahoma Station of Safari Club International, log on to oklahomastationsci.org.

To learn more about the National Wild Turkey Federation in Oklahoma, log on to oknwtf.org.

Field, Forest & Stream exhibit to hit Oklahoma History Center

Oklahoma’s longstanding heritage of enjoying the outdoors is going on display at the Oklahoma History Center next spring to showcase the traditions enjoyed by so many Oklahomans over the years, and the help of Oklahoma’s outdoorsmen is needed to make the event a success.

In April 2008, the Oklahoma Historical Society will bring you over 2000 square feet of outdoor exhibition titled Field, Forest & Stream: The History of Oklahomans and the Outdoors. The exhibit will be located at the Oklahoma History Center, near the state capitol, and will include historic artifacts, images and photography, audio-visual elements and hands-on interaction relating to the outdoors in Oklahoma.

“We are hoping to make this a fun learning experience for visitors of all ages,” said David Davis, curator of special exhibits for the Oklahoma History Center. “A walk down the exhibit’s Forest Trail will reveal beautiful taxidermy dioramas and an interactive hunting blind. A feature about Oklahoma catfish noodling in the exhibit’s Water Trail will allow our more adventurous guests to experience the tactile sensations of this unique sport. A lifelike campfire in the Camp Trail area will set the mood as visitors will have the opportunity to sit and listen to camp stories told by historic Oklahoma figures. These are just a few of the interesting features our guests will find in the Field, Forest & Stream Exhibit So, far we have received a lot of great support for this project. Not only does the Oklahoma History Center already have some very interesting, outdoor related artifacts ready to display, but we are also relying on Oklahomans to help us make this exhibition great.”

Field, Forest, & Stream: The History of Oklahomans and the Outdoors will be made possible through the support and participation of individuals, groups, and businesses such as the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, outdoor television producer Don Wallace and the producers of the On the Water In the Woods television show. Additionally, the Wildlife Department and the Oklahoma Museum of History at the Oklahoma History Center are calling on the people of Oklahoma for donations of historical artifacts, documents, and images related to hunting, fishing, camping, bird watching, wildlife photography, and all other outdoor activities in Oklahoma. Items such as Oklahoma-related fishing lures, hunting calls, clothing, camping gear, boats, canoes, boating equipment, family photos and journals of outdoor experiences in Oklahoma are just a few of the things needed to complete the Field, Forest, & Stream exhibit project.

“If Oklahoma’s sportsmen come together to help with this project, it will make the exhibit even better,” said Micah Holmes, information supervisor for the Wildlife Department. “What better way celebrate our state’s outdoor history than by including pieces of our own past? I would highly encourage hunters and anglers to consider donating items for the Field, Forest & Stream exhibit.”

As the historical museum for the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Museum of History’s mission is to collect, preserve, and share all things related to the history of Oklahoma. Special exhibitions such as Field, Forest, & Stream not only allow the museum to interpret and display interesting aspects of that history, but also allow for the opportunity to strengthen the museum’s artifact collections in areas that are not fully represented. Those interested in sharing their own outdoor heritage by donating their Oklahoma-related outdoor items should contact David Davis, curator of special exhibits, at (405) 522-0780 or e-mail ddavis@okhistory.org.

The Oklahoma History Center is an 18-acre, 215,000 square-foot learning center exploring Oklahoma’s unique history through Smithsonian quality museum exhibits and a state-of-the-art research library. The new home of the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Oklahoma History Center is located just east of the State Capitol in Oklahoma City. The Oklahoma Historical Society was originally organized in 1893 and continues today as a statewide center for learning, preserving, and promoting the history and heritage of the diverse people of Oklahoma through its museum, research, outreach, and historic preservation divisions. The Oklahoma Historical Society serves people of all generations by promoting appreciation and understanding of Oklahoma’s rich history and the impact of that history on the present. For more information call (405) 522-0765 or visit okhistorycenter.org.

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Waterfowl season kicks off second round

After a 12-day rest, waterfowl hunters will be back in action Dec. 8 for the second half of waterfowl season across most of the state.

This year’s 74-day duck season included a 12-day mid season closure and reopens in most of the state Dec. 8. In zone 1, which includes most of northwest Oklahoma, the second half of waterfowl season runs Dec. 8 – Jan. 20, 2008 (Dec. 8-16 for Pintail and Canvasback). Zone two reopens Dec. 8 and runs through Jan. 27, 2008 (Dec. 20 – Jan. 27 for Pintail and Canvasback). Consult the current “Oklahoma Waterfowl Guide” for zone boundaries, specific area regulations, season limits and more, or log on to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

Hunters wanting to stay up on the latest habitat conditions and waterfowl numbers at various lakes, wetlands and other hunting destinations across the state can view the Wildlife Department’s Waterfowl Reports posted regularly throughout the season. The reports can be viewed on wildlifedepartment.com or received by e-mail from the Wildlife Department. Log on to wildlifedepartment.com/wl_news.htm to sign up for the free e-mail.

Hunters who wish to participate in the waterfowl season must posses a resident or non-resident hunting license, fishing and hunting legacy permit, a valid Federal Duck Stamp and Oklahoma Waterfowl License and a Harvest Information Program Permit.

The federal duck stamp costs $15 and is available at U.S. Post Offices. Hunters pursuing sandhill cranes must also purchase a separate sandhill crane hunting permit.

Hunters should consult the current “Waterfowl Hunting Guide” for complete hunting regulations and license requirements. Waterfowl Guides are available at hunting and fishing license dealers statewide, or hunters can obtain complete regulation information from the Wildlife Department’s Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

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OUTDOOR CALENDAR

DECEMBER

Through Jan. 31, 2008: Pheasant season: Consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” for details.

8: Tulsa Chapter Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation European Pheasant Hunt. The hunt starts at 9 a.m. and costs $200 per shooter. A Benelli Nova gun will be given away. Ten birds per shooter, two shooters per station. Includes breakfast/coffee and lunch. For more information contact Barry Lockhart at barry@drbarrylockhart.com <mailto:barry@drbarrylockhart.com> or Gary Lawson at (918) 695-5100.

8: The Kingfisher Roy Boecher chapter of Ducks Unlimited Banquet and Auction. At the Kingfisher fairgrounds exhibit building on 13th St. Doors open at 6 p.m. For more info contact Steve Stolz (405) 834-8974 or Ed Larsen (405) 375-3603.

21-23; 28-30: Special Antlerless Deer Gun Season: Consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” for details.

HUNTER EDUCATION CLINICS

A list of upcoming hunter education clinics is available on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at the following link: http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/courses.htm <http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/courses.htm> .

If a phone number is listed, pre-registration is required. If a phone number is not listed, pre-registration is not required. Special arrangements and testing procedures can be made for persons with disabilities. Contact the Wildlife Department at (405) 522-4572 two weeks prior to the course if a person has disabilities which require special arrangements.

WATERFOWL REPORT FOR DECEMBER 5, 2007

NORTHWEST

Canton: Lake level is 0.32 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. High water levels throughout the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in fair to good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement into the area has increased the last couple of weeks. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as are all boat ramps on the south side of the lake.

Ft. Supply: Lake level is 0.16 ft above normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been low, but expected to increase with cold front.

Washita National Wildlife Refuge: Duck numbers: wigeon 207; mallard 84; gadwall 23; ring-necked 87; bufflehead 25; shoveller 25; canvasback 30; redhead 41; pintail 45. Goose numbers: Canada 84,356; snow 8,848.

SOUTHWEST

Ft. Cobb: Lake level is 0.88 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair along shoreline. All summer crops have been harvested, with some residue left. Duck numbers are low but increasing with each passing front. Goose numbers are good, with large flocks going west to feed on private land.

Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately four foot below conservation pool, with around 300 acres of wetland units flooded. Habitat conditions are fair. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good. Hunter activity is moderate. Hunter success is low. Duck numbers are increasing. Goose numbers are steadily increasing. Hackberry Flat Waterfowl Refuge Portion is closed to all activity from October 15 to January 31.

Mtn. Park: Lake level is 0.65 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded salt cedar around the lake is providing some cover. Winter wheat is fair on the Wildlife Management Area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good, with large numbers in large groups. A large number of geese are using the west side of the Wildlife Management Area.

Waurika: Lake level is 0.18 ft. above normal. Lake habitat condition is poor. Area wheat fields have been planted, and some fields are in good condition. Summer floods greatly affected food plots and wetland units. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low. Waterfowl numbers have slightly increased over the past week. Flooding has begun on wetland units immediately south of SH 53 and Walker Creek.

NORTHEAST

Copan: Lake level is 0.29 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants in the area are in fair condition, with cornfields on the Wildlife Management Area in good condition. Duck numbers are high, with a lot of mallards using the moist soil units. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement continues to increase every day. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds.

Eufaula: Lake level is 1.45 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is very poor due to high summer lake levels that prevented planting of Japanese millet. Very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is low.

Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 1.34 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is good. Due to the extreme high water throughout summer and early fall, the vegetation is in poor shape. There are some agricultural crops in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is slow.

Hulah: Lake level is 0.24 ft. above normal. Lake level is not flooding terrestrial vegetation. Wheat is coming up in various fields. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been low.

Kaw: Lake level is at normal conservation pool. Habitat condition is fair. No millet available in the area, but good native food available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are fair. Bird movement in the area is low.

Keystone: Lake level is 1 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with almost no food available due to prolonged summer flooding on the lake. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Little migration has been seen in the past few days on the area. Hunters utilizing the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone.

Oologah: Lake level is 0.55 ft. above normal. Current habitat conditions are poor to fair. No flooded millet or native vegetation on the lake. Ag fields have been re-planted due to flood conditions this summer and are currently in poor condition. Duck numbers are poor to fair, with some gadwalls and mallards present. Goose numbers are fair, with some giant Canadas and snows seen in the area. Bird movement continues to increase with colder weather. There are three units with water at Overcup Bottoms Wetland Development Unit. Upper Verdigris Wetland Development Unit has a few Gadwalls and both units are 90 percent capacity. Contact the area biologist for information.

Sooner: Lake level is near average. Current habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in fair to poor condition. Duck numbers in the area are low. Goose numbers are fair. Not much waterfowl movement is present in the area, but movement is expected to increase with cold front.

Webbers Falls: Lake level is 3.16 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyardgrass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is slow.

SOUTHEAST

Grassy Slough: Wetlands approximately 60 percent full. Habitat condition is good. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No bird movement noted in the area.

Hugo: Lake level is 0.10 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Very good acorn crop in the area for when water gets up in the river. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are very low. Bird movement in the area is really picking up. Best hunting is in the shallows and creeks as they flow into the river.

Little River National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is good, with good food conditions. Duck numbers: wood duck 375; gadwall 420; mallard 145; wigeon 30. No geese observed.

Red Slough: Wetland units are averaging 70 percent full. Habitat conditions are excellent, with plenty of wild forage. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No bird movement noted in the area.

Texoma: Lake level is 2.42 ft. below normal. Due to high water levels that persisted throughout the growing season, no millet and very little native food is available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are poor. A small increase in bird movement due to split in season.

Wister: Lake level is 0.21 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are good on the development areas, and poor on the lake. Smartweed, sedges and acorns are present on the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Some birds moved through the area, but none are staying. All development units on are currently at 100 percent for second half.

FISHING REPORT FOR DECEMBER 5, 2007

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Elevation normal, water semi-clear. Blue catfish fair to good on shad at 20 ft. up river channel in really deep water, morning and mid-day. Report submitted by Linnie Mason, gate attendant.

NORTHEAST

Birch: Elevation normal, water 54 and clear. Crappie fair on minnows around brush piles and other structure at 10 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits around points at 5 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Eucha: Elevation slightly below normal, water 50 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush and structure at 16-18 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. Channel catfish fair on cut and stinkbaits at spillway and upper end of creek channels. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing dock. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Kaw: Elevation normal, water 50 and stained. Blue catfish good on juglines at Washunga Bay at 25-30 ft. Crappie good at 13-15 ft. in 30 ft. of water at Sarge Creek and Washunga Bay riprap. Report submitted by Larry Green, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Keystone: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water murky to muddy. Largemouth bass fair on jigs, chunkbaits and spinnerbaits at 4-8 ft. in creeks and coves. Smallmouth bass fair on jigs and chunkbaits at 4-8 ft. around secondary points. Spotted bass fair on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 4-8 ft. around main lake points. White bass fair on small crankbaits and minnows at 4-8 ft. around mouths of coves. Striped bass fair on jerk baits and bucktails at 2-5 ft. below dam. Channel catfish fair on worms at 4-8 ft. in creeks and shallow coves. Blue catfish fair on cut shad and punchbaits at 5-10 ft. on flats along river channel. Flathead catfish fair on live shad at 6-12 ft. around bluffs and riprap. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 10-16 ft. around docks and ledges. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation normal, water 54 and clear. Blue catfish good on liver and cut shad around standing timber on north end of the lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 10 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Sooner: White bass and hybrid striped bass good on topwater lures and sassy shad in the discharge channel. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County.

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly below normal, water 53 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinner baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries.

Tenkiller: Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal, water 60 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on small crankbaits in coves. Crappie slow with some action in docks on jigs or minnows. Sunfish fair on worms around docks at 15-20 ft. Report submitted by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along riprap, creek channels and brush structure. Channel catfish good on cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and bridges. Report submitted Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Walleye fair drifting night crawlers. Channel catfish fair on cut bait and stinkbait. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 56 and stained. Crappie good off docks and marked brush piles on chartreuse 1/32 oz. jigs. White bass good at mouths of coves at 25-35 ft. on slabs and chrome spoons. Bass fair to good on Carolina rigs, crankbaits and jigs up creeks at 12-28 ft. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 50 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout good on power baits, roostertails, mealworms and super dupers. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Hunting and Fishing Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on jigs and worms around points and islands. Catfish good on jugs with sunfish. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Walleye biting on deep-running crankbaits after dark around islands and points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Eufaula: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 4-8 ft. around rocks. Blue catfish fair on shad drifting the flats. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-15 ft. around boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 64. Bass and catfish slow. Crappie fair on minnows along the river channel. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 54 and clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

McGee Creek: Elevation normal, water 61 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures off rocky points. Crappie fair on minnows 16-25 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Pine Creek: Elevation below normal, water clear. Bass fair on Carolina rigged lizards at 10-15 ft. Crappie fair on minnows. Channel catfish fair on punch bait and night crawlers around the old bridge. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 52 and murky. Largemouth bass slow at 6-8 ft. using plastic baits fishing the stumps and lay down timber next to the creek channels. Crappie fair at 10 ft. using minnows fishing the bends in the old creek channels. White bass slow at 10 ft. using jigs fishing below Webbers Falls and Kerr dams. Blue catfish good using fresh cut bait, large minnows and worms fishing the Cormorant roost and resting areas. Flathead catfish fair at 20-30 ft. using live bait on trotlines and juglines fishing the river and creek channels. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

Sardis Lake: Elevation normal. Largemouth bass slow in coves. White bass and walleye slow. Blue catfish good to fair on cut bait deep near channels. Crappie excellent on minnows around brush piles and bridges. Flathead catfish slow. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. below normal, water 61 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair on deep diving-crankbaits from 10 -15 ft. in creek channels. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad at 10-20 ft. from Catfish Bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut shad at 10-20 ft. from the Hwy 70 Bridge north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. at Widow Moore, Kansas and Rock creeks. All other fishing is slow. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: Elevation normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits around drop-offs. Crappie fair to slow on live minnows around timber and creek mouths. Channel and blue catfish fair on juglines baited with cut shad. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game Warden stationed in LeFlore County.

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 8 ft. below normal. Fishing is improving. Trout good on corn. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park.

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal and gates closed. Water in the 60s and clear. Hybrids fair on slabs. Crappie fair on live bait. Catfish fair on live bait. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

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