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CATCH THE SLAM "all strains of Black Bass"


MoCarp
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Perhaps its bucket list fish of many angler.....worthy of a pilgrimage!

Largemouth Bass Northern Strain and Florida Strain

A "Florida Strain" Largemouth Bass generally has better defined, & much 
darker, vertical & horizontal lateral lines, than northern strain. 
Their pectoral & anterior dorsal fins are more vertically aligned 
and a bit larger than the northern strain, whose pectorals 
are most generally located just forward of the anterior dorsal fin. Generally more football shaped, longer with thicker tails, oh yeah and harder to catch!
 

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The Smallmouth Bass (top) the Neosho Smallmouth Bass (middle). There is also another “genetically distinct lineage” known as the Ouachita Smallmouth Bass, all available to most in the Ozarks, the Neosho jaw extends far past the eye...

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Spotted Bass, "Kentucky"The spotted bass has a dorsal fin that is clearly connected, while the largemouth appears to have two separate fins. The corner of the jaw does not extend past the eye like a largemouth's does 

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This fish is  generally green in color and can be easily distinguished from other black bass it does not have vertical bars like the smallmouth bass, its jaw does not extend beyond the eyes. In comparison to the spotted bass, the Guadalupe bass coloration extends lower on the body.

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IMHO the Shoal Bass is the coolest looking...similar in body shape to largemouth bass, but unlike the largemouth, the shoal bass has scales on the base portion of the second dorsal fin; their first and second dorsal fins are clearly connected, and its upper jaw does not extend past the eye. Shoal bass also lack the dark lateral line that largemouth have. Shoal Bass have vertical stripes above the midline of the body which resemble tiger stripes.

My 2nd ever shoal bass 150908.jpg

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Suwannee bass is a very heavy fish that seldom exceeds 12 inches long. Mature Suwannee bass have bright turquoise coloring on the cheeks, breast, and belly. The upper jaw does not extend beyond the eye, and there is only a shallow notch between the dorsal fins. A distinct dark blotch where the lateral line meets the caudal fin and scales on bases of dorsal, anal and caudal fins further identify Suwannee bass.  it is native only to the Suwannee and Ochlockonee River drainages in Florida and Georgia.

Photo #2 top is Suwannee top / Florida Largemouth bottom

 

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The redeye bass has a slender bronze-olive body that fades into white on the belly. It has dark lateral blotches along the side and horizontal rows of spots on the lower side and distinguishing white edges along the upper and lower edges of the caudal fin which similar species don't have. An orange margin is also often present on the caudal and anal fins. The mouth is large and extends to the rear edge of the eye, but not beyond

The Redeye bass is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family native to the Coosa River system of Georgia, Alabama. The waters it is normally found in are cool streams and rivers in the foothills.

 

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