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Hook Sharpening


merc1997 Bo

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here is a subject i will throw out for discussion, and that is hook sharpening. as for me, i have never seen what i would call a sharp hook out of the package. i sharpen everyone of mine, and especially before a tournament. i use a high grade mill file, and create a diamond shaped point. this creates four cutting edges, which i have found to penetrate much better than a conical point. i also believe the diamond shape to have much more rigidity than conical points and will take much more abuse without dulling or bending over.

lets hear what everyone else does.

bo

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Bo, I've been full circle in my own mind on this subject twice! (very small diameter circles!) I own one of these Razor's Edge fish hook sharpeners and it puts the sharpest cutting point edge I've ever seen on a hook.... Like a surgical instrument! But I've found that edge doesn't last as long as a conical point and requires a touch up now and then, making it a extra process I'd rather not have to go thru during the day, especially in a tournament. I also find it interesting that you put 4 flats on your hook and not 3, by the way. But after it's all said and done, I prefer conical points to cutting points, the Gamakatsu conical points are chemically sharpened as to not effect the tempering of the steel like a mechanical honing/filing would. I usually replace hardbait hooks with Gama EWG's before I use them....Even the Luckycraft. I prefer Gamakatsu or Owners to anything and usually don't need to sharpen them.

One of the things that I've heard about cutting points is that they will "tear" a hole in the soft membranes of the lip and as the fish is fighting it will wallow out into a bigger hole, increasing the chance of a thrown bait when the fish is shaking it's head. I've also noticed (could be wrong) that many of these so-called cutting point hooks like Owner actually are led with a needle sharp conical point at the tip anyway, and then blends into a cutting point further back.....my 2.5 cents

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"Honor is a man's gift to himself" Rob Roy McGregor

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I'm all about sharp hooks and I used to take the time to sharpen my own. But technology has long passed me by in terms of not only getting a hook surgically sharp, but also making one that will pretty much stay that way. I still work full time, so my fishing time is limited. Frankly, I'd rather fish than sharpen hooks.

So like Mitch, I spend the extra coin and replace my stock hooks with Owner Stinger or Daichi Deathtrap premium trebles. I do keep a hook file on hand to dress up the point on single-hook baits such as spinnerbaits, buzz baits, jigs, etc. However, if I'm fishing a tournament and roll a hook point over on one of those, I generally change baits and save the old one for recreational fishing (after I redress the point).

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do you ever do some testing on your own with something as simple as a cardboard box lid. take a hook out of the package and feel how much pressure you exert to get the hook to penetrate the lid. then sharpen that same hook and repeat process. i have not found one hook that was sharper to begin with. they always penetrate easier after i sharpen them. just my own personal experience. i love catching big bass, and to aid in landing them, it really helps when the hook is stuck through bone and not skin. this requires a sharp sturdy point, and i have had more success over the years with a point with four cutting edges. ever notice that buildings that finish with a pointed top are most often diamond shaped?? i would imagine the reason would be for strength. anyway, it is one of those subjects that will probably still be debated after i am long gone. besides, with this weather, we do not have anything better to do :have-a-nice-day: . i wonder just how far south you would have to go to get out of the cold. they are cold at falcon too. water temps are down in the middle to upper 50's. should be some really good jerk baiting when it is fit to get back out. keep those hooks sharp.

bo

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I have lost fish on single spins with large hooks because of fish jumping with it in there mouth. That was the spinners fault and my own. I have lost bass when the hook did not penentrste through a plastic lure worms in particular. I believe nearly everyone of those was do to balling up of the bait. And I have lost a few do to poor hook set. Then I have lost some because of damaging the point and not noticing it. But I cannot ever remember having lost one because the hook I bought was not good enough. I do all my worm fishing with PBS or Eagle Claw brands. I think 99% of these alleged hook losses are angler failuure. Only time I worry about hook sharpness is in late winter or early spring with suspended baits. They will come up real slow sometimes and just mouth the lure without even moving it. I been fishing long enlugh that i can tell when a hook is sharp enough and when its not.

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Hey Bo, Since we're on the subject of hooks, I would like your input, what's your opinion on a longer shank OShaunessy style hook vs a shorter shank round bend... Which one has the better hook up percentage?

Question 2: we had this discussion in the general discussion section a while back. Which hook do you feel penetrates quicker, a light wire or a heavy wire hook?

"Honor is a man's gift to himself" Rob Roy McGregor

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i will take a heavier wire hook over light wire hooks. the lighter wire flexes in the throat, and actually requires more force and energy to penetrate. a cardboard box lid will tell you all you know. we have put up two videos on this subject with visual tests to prove the point. the o'Shaunessey will penetrate will, but has a trade off of the pull line being nearer the hook point than a round bend. the longer the hook shank, the better it is to keep the line of pull from the line tie and the hook point lined up. a good example is the short shank trebles they put on cranks and jerks baits now. just take one of those, and tie a line to it, and get the "ol" cardboard box lid, and see how hard it is to pull the line and get that short shank treble to ever go through the lid. most of the time, they will skip along. reason being the shank is so short, as soon as you pull on the line tied to it, the hook point start rotating away from the line of pull. just try it for yourself, and you will easily see.

bo

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All makes sense but sometimes you can add one bigger size trebles on a crank if the shanks are shorter, and they won't interfere with each other. Kind of a trade off. Great information Bo!!!!

"Honor is a man's gift to himself" Rob Roy McGregor

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